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How to store skis

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Is there any "preferred" method of storing skis ? (obviously: dry, indoors, not with the binding brakes latched together... what else ?)

I just built a ski shelf for the rafters in my shed; consists basically of 2 2x4 brackets, about 40" wide, so I can lay the skis down on them. I placed them on the 2x4s with the bases pointed upwards. The 2x4s are about 36" apart, so the skis are supporting their own weight. Anything to be concerned with here ? (they're not going to change their camber like this, are they ?)
post #2 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Chupacabra
Is there any "preferred" method of storing skis ? (obviously: dry, indoors, not with the binding brakes latched together... what else ?)

I just built a ski shelf for the rafters in my shed; consists basically of 2 2x4 brackets, about 40" wide, so I can lay the skis down on them. I placed them on the 2x4s with the bases pointed upwards. The 2x4s are about 36" apart, so the skis are supporting their own weight. Anything to be concerned with here ? (they're not going to change their camber like this, are they ?)
Tune them, or have them tuned.

Leave the wax on, including edges. Thats about it. If the ski is damaged by your method of hanging, thousands of skis are damaged by ski shops each year. I think you'll be fine.
post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingman
Tune them, or have them tuned.

Leave the wax on, including edges. Thats about it. If the ski is damaged by your method of hanging, thousands of skis are damaged by ski shops each year. I think you'll be fine.
Yep, I do leave a coat of wax on, including over the edges. (Forgot to list that one.)
post #4 of 25
I also have another tip - after I'm done skiing for the year, I put my alpine ski bindings to close to zero DIN. I use a manual screwdriver.
post #5 of 25
Powdog, you mean you don't choose to use an airdriver, topping out the torque, seeing if you can spin it out.. springs flying through the air...?!
post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by powdog
I also have another tip - after I'm done skiing for the year, I put my alpine ski bindings to close to zero DIN. I use a manual screwdriver.
I've read conflicting advice on backing off the DIN setting for storage; some say do it to make the springs last longer, others say this is old-school thought, no need to do this with current bindings. Dunno which is true.

I've never backed off the DIN setting for storage, and can't say I've noticed any problems with my bindings as a result. (I also haven't kept any bindings or skis for more than 3-4 years.)
post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Chupacabra
I've read conflicting advice on backing off the DIN setting for storage; some say do it to make the springs last longer, others say this is old-school thought, no need to do this with current bindings. Dunno which is true.

I've never backed off the DIN setting for storage, and can't say I've noticed any problems with my bindings as a result. (I also haven't kept any bindings or skis for more than 3-4 years.)
If the springs are designed properly, it doesn't make a bit of difference. If it did make a difference, you wouldn't want to be skiing in those bindings anyway.

Of key importance: Having a trusted shop torque test the binding with your boot at the beginning of each season. You'd be surprised how often some brands of bindings require adjustment to fall within the proper torque range. Almost all bindings need some tweaking to get them "centered" in the range.
-Garrett
post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingman
If the springs are designed properly, it doesn't make a bit of difference. If it did make a difference, you wouldn't want to be skiing in those bindings anyway.

Of key importance: Having a trusted shop torque test the binding with your boot at the beginning of each season. You'd be surprised how often some brands of bindings require adjustment to fall within the proper torque range. Almost all bindings need some tweaking to get them "centered" in the range.
-Garrett
I've also heard that the torque-testing machine (Vermont something-or-other) isn't all that great. One shop I recall told me that all they do is attempt to kick the boot out of the binding; if it comes free, the binding works... (seems kinda haphazard to me).
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Chupacabra
I've also heard that the torque-testing machine (Vermont something-or-other) isn't all that great.
When properly calibrated and used, it is very accurate.

I would bet a good number of shops either fudge using it at all, or don't use it properly with the appropriate test procedure.

Many bigger shops now have automated testers, such as the one from Wintersteiger. You set the binding up, input the skier data into the machine, and the machine does the test procedure. Its a wee-bit quicker, and more accurate. It isn't really any more precise, if the Vermont Calibrator user is well trained.

Quote:
One shop I recall told me that all they do is attempt to kick the boot out of the binding; if it comes free, the binding works... (seems kinda haphazard to me).
Don't trust those people with your legs. I'm being completely serious.

One of the required tests is "elastic travel and return" which means the boot is struck (usually with a rubber mallet) at the toe each way, to make sure it both travels smoothly across its range of travel and has low enough friction to "come back" to its original position. Marker junior bindings are notorious for failing that test.

A ski can pass that test just fine and still not fall into the appropriate torque range. Each binding is tested at least three times in both directions at the toe, and three times vertically at the heel. That means that each pair of skis requires at least 18 carefully executed releases with a calibrated torque wrench. More if adjustments are required. You may begin to understand why this costs 15-30 dollars.

In a rental environment, all bindings must be tested at the beginning of the season, and then a random sample of 2 percent each week. Conservatively, I'd estimate that I've tested about 2000 pair of bindings in the last 3 years. (One has to be 18 to sign the paperwork, and I'm 20 now.)

Of those 2000 pair, roughly 10 percent of brand new bindings deserved adjustment, and roughly 20 percent of used one year or more bindings REQUIRED adjustment. If you look at it on a brand by brand basis, it gets even more interesting. I love Look/Rossignol bindings, but its likely that up to a third of them require an adjustment at the toe or heel to stay DIN/ISO compliant within the first 2 years. Atomics are in the same boat. Tyrolia varies a lot per model. Marker, again, per model. Salomon bindings have some of the most consistent release values you'll ever find.

The binding indemnification agreements don't ask a lot of the shops, but a lot of shops don't do what they ask. Accountability is only as good as the industry self-regulates it to be.
-Garrett
post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 
So if I'm looking for a good ski shop, which has proper binding testing equipment, what should I ask them ?

- how do you test bindings for proper function & calibration
- what equipment do you use to test bindings
- (what else) ?

Thanks-
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Chupacabra
So if I'm looking for a good ski shop, which has proper binding testing equipment, what should I ask them ?

- how do you test bindings for proper function & calibration
- what equipment do you use to test bindings
- (what else) ?

Thanks-
Tough question. Its kind of like looking for a good shop to repair your automobile. If you don't have intimate knowledge of what is wrong with the car when it goes in, its nearly impossible to really know if they are doing their job.

I would honestly look for a shop with a Wintersteiger or other automatic binding tester. Those machines have a steep purchase price, and are some sort of signal that the shop is serious about testing. The machine gives you a separate printout, so you can actually see that the binding was setup properly and either tested OK or required an adjustment.

If you just ask the service manager, it should be pretty easy to see whether or not they are serious. I said that Vermont Calibrators can be very accurate, but unfortunately they don't provide the accountability (printout) that the machines do. FWIW, the shop I work for doesn't have a machine, and I wish we did. The cost is difficult to justify.
-Garrett
post #12 of 25
Looks like I'm committing a number of sins by storing my skis suspended from their tips in a 'pinch' of 2 1" dowels, flat surfaces together, brakes interlocked. What kind of damage in the long temr would this do - PMs only, I can't stand the embarrassment!
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by simon
Looks like I'm committing a number of sins by storing my skis suspended from their tips in a 'pinch' of 2 1" dowels, flat surfaces together, brakes interlocked. What kind of damage in the long temr would this do - PMs only, I can't stand the embarrassment!
No way Simon, thats perfectly fine. You aren't doing any damage.

A couple of years ago, K2 rubber decals were damaged with such a system....their fault for putting something so weaksauce on the topsheet to begin with. That was strictly cosmetic anyway.
-Garrett
post #14 of 25
Skis should be stored resting on their backs (never their sides!) in small beds without pillows or loose bedding. Skis enjoy simple high-contrast mobiles. You should also consider a cordless ski monitor.
post #15 of 25
bwahahahahaha!
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Chupacabra
Is there any "preferred" method of storing skis ? (obviously: dry, indoors, not with the binding brakes latched together... what else ?)
I always leave my skis with the brakes latched together, is that a no-no? If I had the room I would separate the skis but space is a problem when we're talking about 10 pairs of skis for the whole family.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard
I always leave my skis with the brakes latched together, is that a no-no? If I had the room I would separate the skis but space is a problem when we're talking about 10 pairs of skis for the whole family.
IMHO, its not a big deal.

I haven't come across a problem with this. I have some skis that have been stored that way for nearly a decade.
post #18 of 25
ssjohnson- I love it!!!!!!!!!

I am sure that your suggestions will result in a dramatic reduction in SSDS (sudden ski death syndrome) if widely followed. I will have to pass this on to my colleagues in the American Academy of Pediatrics!
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Chupacabra
I've read conflicting advice on backing off the DIN setting for storage; some say do it to make the springs last longer, others say this is old-school thought, no need to do this with current bindings. Dunno which is true.

I've never backed off the DIN setting for storage, and can't say I've noticed any problems with my bindings as a result. (I also haven't kept any bindings or skis for more than 3-4 years.)
Not necessary (sp?), think of the spring as the spring in a ballpoint pen.
Even if you keep it tightened all the time, it will immediately jump back when you push the back of the pen.
That's why they are called springs, they always keep their elasticity unless overstretched.
Not waying anything about accuracy though...

However, to my shame I must admit I have turned them down once, at the end of the season.
The first day of the next season I fell 5 times in less than an hour because of my ski's releasing on every bump.
Yep, you guessed it, I forget to screw 'em back up.
post #20 of 25
The best advice I received was to "store them where you can see them". I do that with whatever skis are currently used. In the summer if there is nothing to do I will wax and brush them polish the edges etc.. By being visible in my front hallway they enhance my anticipation of the coming season.

My "retired skis" are in various closets. One day I will think of some way to display them without cutting them into benches.
post #21 of 25
i keep mine next to the fireplace in my living room so i can look at them all summer!!!!
post #22 of 25
I back off the bindings much the same as snap-on recommends you return a torque wrench to it's lowest setting after you use it. There is a reason for that. If it's good for a torque wrench backing off the bindings for the off season can't be bad.

I tune our skis and leave yellow wax on them and lay them with bases up in a warm spot upstairs in my house. It may get up to the high 80's up there after a warm spell.

Been doing that for years.

It's almost time to bring them down and scrape the wax and hit them with the rotor brush then load them in the ski box for there annual trip to the house in VT.
post #23 of 25

Last 2 years I didn't do anything. Didn't store the skis or gear, nothing. Just left them where they sit all winter for me to grab. (read: living room)

I'm really not legendary or have thought this out at all. I just am a slob.

post #24 of 25

I usually sell everything off at the end of the season. It is easier for someone else to store them. What I do keep...A good coat of summer wax and leave the bindings as they were. 

post #25 of 25

I usually sell everything off at the end of the season. It is easier for someone else to store them. What I do keep...A good coat of summer wax and leave the bindings as they were. 

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