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Little Jumps and Tricks - Getting Started

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I picked up some Salomon 1080s for fun while skiing bumps and trees.

I was wondering how difficult it would be to throw very basic 180s and 360s on these skis.

I am 28 so I am also debating the risks of doing small jumps. Using my season pass for only a month would suck.

I am assuming I should do some straight airs to get comfortable in the air and then try a 180 and go from there.

I know Sunday River has a little kid terrain park that would probably be a good start.

Also any tips would be appreciated.
post #2 of 24
Become friendly with ski patrol. A case of some good microbrew will do as a start. I'll take delivery for you and be sure it gets to the appropriate folks!
post #3 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
I am 28 so I am also debating the risks of doing small jumps.
Stop making me feel old, sonny! There's no risk in jumping. The risk is in failing to remain upright. Start by learning to ski switch, afterall, you'll have to do that anyhow. Then you'll know better when you'll be able to land the 180 and ski out of it.

Cheers!
post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 
I had been playing around with skiing switch last year so I feel pretty comfortable doing that.

I am sure twins make it alot easier.

I have also read a tip that said when you are about to pop over the lip to pretend like you are jumping straight up onto a bench or chair. I would assume this would stop you from leaning too far forward or backward.
post #5 of 24
Find a stash and practice with a nice soft landing zone, icy terrain park landings suck when you miss.
post #6 of 24
I'm 28 too and still play in the park a lot - us old folks can take it

I find 360s a lot easier than 180s... landing backwards (or taking off backwards) is harder than landing facing downhill.

Getting good pop is going to be important in getting enough time to rotate all the way around. Your rotation style is going to be whatever is comfortable. I have a good friend who "pre-winds" as he approaches and uses that to get around. I start my rotation at the lip as I pop off the jump and spin mine from there. Spin in the direction you are comfortable with. Make sure you spot your landing as you come around or you will eat it.

Definitely take JeffW's advice and find a nice soft spot to practice on at first. The park is usually very icy/hard and the landings can hurt (plus those little kids laughing at you while they effortless hurl through the air is annoying).
post #7 of 24
get some practice skiing switch (mainly with you head remaining over one shoulder and not switch back and forth). Do flatspins on the snow while moving to get somewhat used to the rotations (and if you have to save a landing). Practice 180's and 360's in your house jumping straight up, find which direction you are more comfortable with. You need to know that a switch 180 is easier than a regular 180 (simply body mechanics) and 180 may take some time to get comfortable landing backwards. On snow, practice with straight airs, get comfortable with your timing (pop) and landing and general "air-sense". Practice 180's on little hits that can be found all over the hill (ones you can turn into so you are cheating your rotations - spinning less than 180).

Just remember the only one you are their to impress is yourself, ignore negative comments from on-lookers, and recruit the advice of the people that know what they are doing (you'd be amazed how many "park kids" know what they are doing and are more than willing to share their knowledge), but first you must learn park etiquette, or you will quickly become the most hated person in the park.

Now your questions about "popping", while you are right the pop needs to be vertical, you have to make sure you are not popping perpendicular to the angle of the launch/ramp/lip, and timing always seems tough for people to get, personally I focus on "feeling" the flex in my skis and try to pop just as the pressure is releasing (if that makes any sense to you).

But when learning freestyle type stuff, the most important word is HELMET (especially on the east coast), invest in a good one and make sure it fits properly, and keep in mind one good impact on the helmet and its time to get another (even if it looks ok).
post #8 of 24
Scalce,

Just to add my two cents: start your 180's standing still on level ground with your skis on. This will help you with the timing and popping straight up. Then try doing it while moving forward on a gentle slope. Next, try it over rollers. Then small jumps.

With a 360, start on level ground in just your boots, pop up THEN turn (head and shoulders). Don't wind it up. Do this until it feels balanced. Find a slow jump that'll give you 2-3 feet of air. You do exactly the same thing with the skis on. A good trick when you're ready to jump is to do a 3 in your boots, pop the skis on, roll into the jump and do exactly the same thing. Don't pop until you're at the lip of the jump - anticipating the twist will cause you to start too early and most likely catch your tails on the jump lip as they come around. This is why most people stall out around 270.

Patience is the key. Have fun. BTW, I learned my first 3 in my mid-thirties. Let me know when you're ready for rails...
post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the tips.

Can't wait to try them out.
post #10 of 24
For your first 360s look for a sidehill hit that allows you to land facing 270 and ski out. Windlips are perfect, as are the bottom of the pipe where the walls are short and not vert. Some trail intersections are good, but be very carefull about traffic. Once you get the sidehill down, try it off a small loaf or spine. you will find that with practice you can land 3's with no hit al all, just out of a traverse on the groomed. Good luck, nothing feels as sweet as landing your first spin.
post #11 of 24
GREAT THREAD!
post #12 of 24
A 180 and a 360 are totally different animals in my opinion.

As people have mentioned, you can do 360s off really really small lips and jumps which makes learning them easy - no need to kill yourself on big jumps going fast. Although make sure if you are doing a little jump that it doesn't have an awkward transition that kicks you into the air off balance.

A 180 really doesn't require you to commit as much since you can keep your head/eyes (and shoulders to an extent) facing downhill and spin your legs/skis 180 underneath. However, the biggest factor I found in successful 360s is turning your head and shoulders whichever side you are comfortable spinning just as you pop off the jump and letting your body follow. This is the hardest part - it is counterintuitive to willingly look behind yourself, away from your landing, when you fly off a jump - but it is the key to success with 360s too.

Most importantly though be sure you are comfortable with the transition and landing of a jump just doing straight airs before you try spins and fancy stuff. I never spin off of a jump I haven't straight aired at least once.

Landing my first 360 was one of the coolest feelings in all of skiing for me so hopefully this thread will help people stomp some and share the enjoyment.
post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
I am trying to find some small hits at Sunday River to practice on.

They have a kids park called Whoville but you can't really spin off the jump because there is no lip and it's on a green run so it's hard to build up speed. Plus there are way too many little kids that have no park experience so they travers over stuff.

I think the Amex park has a few hits that aren't too bad.
post #14 of 24
Scalace im in the same boat as you i got my Public Enemies so i could ski all mountain, and now I find myself spending more and more time in the park trying to slide rails, getting air. this year i am gonna go for a 3 and 180's but i haven't been able to find my 'perfect jump' they are all either too icy, or too big with a sketchy landing. plus all the little hills i ski have way over crowded parks, and if you fall, you will get hit. i vwill be listening to all your ideas, and this weekend i WILL put them to use
post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
I have been hitting everything in site when I am on them so I am pretty comfortable doing straight airs.

Now I just need to get the balls to start spinning.

I have been skiing switch and doing butters just to get a feel for bringing the skis around and not getting disoriented.
post #16 of 24
I still make sure I turn at least one 360 in a season. Last year it didn't happen till my last day at A-basin (I ended up doing 6 or so). I am at the point (in age, over 40) that I look for ideal take off and LANDING conditions. I am more of a floater than a popper. I also like the wind blown/trail meeting type of take offs. I turn counter clockwise so I plat my left pole at the lip of the launch and pivot off of that. I know "spines" aren't as comon in parks any more, but they work well for me too.

Don't forget the othet "old school jumps like...
Daffys
Bakscratchers
Iron crosses
Spread eagles
Twisters
Tipcrosses
Screaming seamans

and Combinations there of
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
I still make sure I turn at least one 360 in a season. Last year it didn't happen till my last day at A-basin (I ended up doing 6 or so). I am at the point (in age, over 40) that I look for ideal take off and LANDING conditions. I am more of a floater than a popper. I also like the wind blown/trail meeting type of take offs. I turn counter clockwise so I plat my left pole at the lip of the launch and pivot off of that. I know "spines" aren't as comon in parks any more, but they work well for me too.

Don't forget the othet "old school jumps like...
Daffys
Bakscratchers
Iron crosses
Spread eagles
Twisters
Tipcrosses
Screaming seamans

and Combinations there of
Yeah I still love ripping a few enormous daffys every year even though it probably makes all the park rats cringe when they see it. Who cares though, daffys are really fun!
post #18 of 24
Welcome Aboard, and Thank You for flying Old School Airlines...

post #19 of 24
Hmmmmm

I took a one hour freestyle park/pipe class at alpine meadows this weekend. one of things the instructor focussed on was to "too keep the hands way in front" at/after the pop. this assures that your body stays balanced and that you land on the front part of your skies.

I find it interesting that nobody mentioned this above.

- to ski backwards - he suggested a) lean into the hill b)kick left/right using your toes.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manus
but first you must learn park etiquette, or you will quickly become the most hated person in the park.
This is a great thread, and let me say thanks to all that have contributed. My 34 year old body is also craving some air time. I plan on working on my technique in Park City at the end of February. Now exactly how do I learn "park etiquette" without simply getting yelled at? Any general advice?
post #21 of 24
boredtoo

one piece of advice my instructor gave me - the park is full of kids. a number of them are reckless. hence you need to be extra careful. wait in line. make eye contact with the person behind you to assure that he/she understands that you are going in next. quickly look behind you - before you head down towards the lip, rail or box - to make sure nobody is speeding down towards the park without waiting in line.
post #22 of 24
Thanks Marty, that makes sense. I just wasn't sure if there was some type of secret sign language (other than "the finger" sign)...
post #23 of 24
'Park Etiquit' mainly consits of
1. dont be a **** < lack of better word
2.dont come down the run cut in line never stop hit somthing small and keep going
3.dont cut the line
4.wait your turn, every one hates the person who doesn't wait
5. make eye contact. if you arnt going and someone else wants to go give them a little nod or say 'go ahead'
6. if a boarder is sitting he isn't waiting to go, if he's standing then hes wating to go
the finger sign is usful if someone blatantly brakes these rules (like the noob who comes in and does 2 inch hop off the side of a rail)

thats all i can think of right now but im sure some people can add some stuff. some of the guys there are cool and will help you others just dont care and then there are the morons.
post #24 of 24
some park etiquete:
always ask if anyone is "dropping" if there is a wait for a hit. When you go, say "dropping" so people know you are going
NEVER hit the jump onto a rail as just a jump (not even attempting the rail), unless you are jumping clear over the rail
make sure there is plenty of room between you and the person in front of you (especially in the pipe) so you don't jam up
if you are just skiing through, checking out the jumps (a very good idea before hitting them), make sure you are not interfering with anyone else's line

Basically be cool to everyone, there will always be pricks in the park, but there is no need to stopp to their level. Most of the people in the park will be cool and will answer any questions you might have (and often they can teach you new tricks too).
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