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For my 666th post...Most Hellish thing you have done on skis?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Bad...bad...Senior Year in HS. Got my pass taken away from my mother (long story), Skipped school to go skiing (see no. 1), was at Camelback after coming down Hump went into the woods because we made a nice jump back to the trail, as I came out, I (blindly) turned a heli..3/4 the way through it...my skis went right into the chest of a ski patroller. ooof...No pass..skipping school...skiing "reckelss"...The day ended Hellish.

Bad...good...Last year out at A-Basin...last day of my vacation and of the ski year...dropping off of the Cornice. I was consistantly dropping 20ish feet than the last run in I didn't realize how fast I was going...Boy was I in the air along time I was up long enough to get week knees in the air..when I landed I was shaking...Had to drop 25-30 feet. what a rush it was. Maybe for you guys who are there all the time, its not alot..but for us flatlanders who don't get the chance but once a year.. it was Hellish
post #2 of 29
I've never done anything hellish, but I did ski into a gaggle of people standing around while getting off a lift that had a steep ramp once. It was in slow motion, too. I just glided into the middle real slow saying "Scuse me, pardon me, sorry", and they all fell over in a tangled heap.

That'll teach them to congregate 20 feet from the off ramp.
post #3 of 29
During years of teaching in Australia, we did a weekly fire jump...roughly a 10-15 foot gap jump with a bonfire bigger than a Ford Expedition blazing in the middle..while the folks who got hurt during the previous week's jump...tossed ziplocs full of gasoline on it. We learned to tuck our hair in and cover most exposed skin....plus...they paid us to do it and a little liquid courage made the fire seem a tiny bit smaller.
post #4 of 29
hellish bad: everyone can tell multiple versions of this kind of story: took two beloved older relatives on a black diamond slope with my young daughter. Relatives not happy with degree of difficulty. they had been decent skiers years ago, but were very rusty. me and daughter teased them all the way down. they got more and more angry. eventually removed skis and walked straight to bar for rest, recovery and liquid tranquilizers. they held underlying hostility towards me for about 3 years. all's forgiven now and we enjoy blue square trails together occasionally.

hellish good: many years ago had legs of steel from running track. used to hold tight tuck for two miles down trails at home mtn, used to do this repeatedly during uncrowded nightski sessions. burned like hell, but in a good way. now i can hold tight tuck for 200 feet and usually get a bad wedgy from it.
post #5 of 29
I wouldn't call it "hellish" exactly but I did a cliff jump at Jackson Hole that left me with a serious bout of self examination. It was a cross-slope kind of jump out from between the trees up below the bluff that is above the old Thunder chair, I think. It really was not difficult. I stuck the landing fine and I imagine JH regulars think nothing of it nowadays but I realized that if I hadn't carried enough distance I'd have landed on the rocks and trees below the cliff and there was some guy down there picking himself up that I could easily have landed on. No wonder the spotter at the top of the jump was frantically waving me "right", "right"! A short while later I was sitting in the old mid mountain shack drinking a beer and thinking seriously about how short my life and skiing career had almost become when I was approached by one of the locals, a fellow with a blond pony tail, and his lady companion...but, that's another story.
post #6 of 29
2 hellish come to mind:
1st - school ski trip in France...I was a tad busy looking at this very *cough* nice looking ski patrol dude when 'whoooooosh'...off the cliff I went. Took them a long time to get me out (blush).

2nd - You know those signs that say "do not ski alone"? Well last spring I was dying to hit one of the back lines at Winter Park. It was a beautiful tree run but I had not counted on the "sink" factor being so late in the season. Every time I slowed to avoid the impending *oof SMACK* into a tree, I sank up to my shoulders in snow. It took me 1 hour to get out of there. I headed straight to the top and downed a couple schnapps shots.
post #7 of 29
I was skiing Killington's Bear Peak a few years back; there is one trail on that mountain known as "Bear Claw". It's marked as a black diamond, but in truthfulness, it's really more like a hard blue -- i.e., a "gray" in my book. But there is one stretch of it about 100 yards long known as the "Viper Pit" where it does get very "black" for a short stretch. There is always a crowd of gapers standing at the top of it with that "OH MY GOD" look on their face.

So, my buddy and I are cruising down Bear Claw one fine morning, and we come around a bend in the trail, and there's the usual crowd on top of the Viper Pit. For reasons that escape me today, we decided to "show" the tourists how this was meant to be done, so we made a high-speed approach and right when I got to the edge, I jumped. I never got very high, but when the ground is falling away from you, it takes a while to come back down. I easily cleared about 80, 90 feet of it in the air. I stuck the landing but was so petrified that I just took the rest of it straight. I brought it to a stop and my buddy skied up beside me and remarked that "I guess you showed them". We looked back up at the crowd atop the Viper Pit and they all had the : look going on.
post #8 of 29
Which one to you want. Hitting a parked car on skis being towed through town behind a snowmobile while trying to empty the vapors from a bottle of Boone's Farm Strawberry Hill? Or, betting my buds that I could jump and ski across the sewage lagoon? How about being upside down 20+ feet in the air hanging by powder straps from skis that were lodged in the branches all while being directly under the chair lift on double black terrain? Or my first 40+ cliff jump? I could go on.

Now its pretty exciting to ride the chair lift with a good looking woman.
post #9 of 29
Wow! You have done a lot of adventurous stuff on skis! I on the otherhand am a very careful skier (not into tricks, etc). The most I have done is go over a few small bumps and a 3-4 foot (at the most) jump. I am pretty cautious. This does not mean I do not have fun though. I love skiing and have a great time.
Where do you ski Pierre? I've been in Ohio and it is so flat. Do you go to PA, MD, WV,etc?
post #10 of 29
As a kid we used to slalom the moving t-bars. After we got yelled at for that we would ski as close to the t-bar as possible, short swing, adults hated us.
post #11 of 29
Confession time. It was my first trip to Tuckerman's, and because we didn't know about the Sherburne Trail, and my buddy and I were the last people up there, seeing that it was a crappy snowing blowing day in May and the corn was frozen hard as a rock, we skied down the hiking trail. But that's not the hellish part, Noooo.

When we got about 2/3 of the way down and ran out of snow - I discovered that my hiking boots were not in my backpack. So after a long day of hiking and trying to ski rock-hard frozen corn, I had to hike back up to HoJos, in my ski boots, where, fortunately, my hiking boots were sitting waiting for me on the front porch. Then I skied back down the hiking trail in the dark. Did my buddy come along to share the misery - yeah, right.
post #12 of 29

Yo! Pierre!

"Hitting a parked car on skis being towed through town behind a snowmobile while trying to empty the vapors from a bottle of Boone's Farm Strawberry Hill?"

I remember hearing about that one. Now, what vintage was the Boone's Farm?

"How about being upside down 20+ feet in the air hanging by powder straps from skis that were lodged in the branches all while being directly under the chair lift on double black terrain?"

Uh huh. Mushroom Chutes at Jackson.
post #13 of 29

Rerun......

Sometime in the early to mid-70’s I was skiing on a pair of Kneissl Short Comps with Besser bindings. About 170 cm. It was a time when short skis and freestyle encouraged bad technique. If you were a type III skier you either skied correctly (raced or skied on East Coast hardpack) or tried to emulate the latest freestyle weirdness. I’m sure that there were things in-between but that is not the point of this post. Not being good enough to race and growing up with Cascade Crud, I was unfortunately influenced by the darkside. The Jet Turn, Slow Dog Noodle, bad technique. One night at Ski Acres I came face-to-face with the co-mingling of bad gear and bad technique and lived to tell about it.

The Besser was a plate binding which provided release faces for “legacy” boot soles. If you don’t know the binding imagine an aluminum plate about the length of the boot sole with an over-center lever to hold the heel down (like a step-in crampon) and a toe lug that slipped over the front of the boot sole. The ends of the plate had release faces that inter-faced with a piston on the front and a housing on the back. Since this design pre-dated integrated ski brakes there was a short metal loop attaching the toe lug to the piston in front. You never had to climb up hill to get your ski after a release (if you were still conscious).

I was on a reasonably steep bump run. As I went into a trough I edged towards the fall line and sat back to absorb the bump (bad technique). The skis flexed deeply and as I reached the top of the bump, they began to counter-flex. Since I was sitting wayyy back looking cool both plates released vertically at the toes. I remember looking at my yellow Astral Slaloms and realizing that I was now airborne without my skis. I figured that landing on my butt would be my least hurtful course of action. Since I was flying through the night air facing downhill I had time to see that nobody but me was about to be injured. I also remember looking at the traffic below on I-90. Both skis were just sort of out there in front of me waving around, tethered to my toes with those damn wire loops. Finally I approached touchdown.

Just before I hit the snow my right ski rotated enough so that the tip touched first. I felt the body of the ski come up between my legs and gently touch my crotch. My impact coupled with the connection of the wire loop at the toe drove the tip deep into the snow. Since the tail was between my legs it mercifully slid up past my butt and under the waistband of my jacket. In the blink of an eye the tail of the ski was driven through the back of my coat.

I stopped very quickly with my right knee bent back, my foot hanging from the wire loop. My left foot and ski were downhill. The tip of the right ski was buried nearly to the toe piston while the tail stuck grotesquely out of the back of my jacket. I was hanging (as though nailed to a post) facing downhill on the tail of that ski. I couldn’t even get myself loose. I just hung there (amazed that I was alive and still able to procreate) and flailed, attempting to get loose. I couldn't quite reach the heel lever on the right ski so I had to hang there until I could flag down some other skiers. After laughing at me, they convinced me that I had to unzip my jacket first, then they released my right foot. Once on my feet I removed my jacket from the tail of my ski and tried to put it back on with as much dignity as I could muster. There was insulation everywhere from the gaping hole in my jacket. It was very humiliating.

Damages: Ski jacket was destroyed. Ego was severely bruised. My neck suffered serious zipper rash when I came to such an abrupt stop and flailed to get loose.
post #14 of 29
Hellish--yes, gnarly--no. The year was 1979. I was in my early 20s working in Minneapolis. Skied often that year with my brother-in-law. We enjoyed night skiing at Afton Alps. A few days before hand, we had marked a day on the calendar as the next evening for skiing. When the day arrived, a cold front had swept in and it was -15 degrees with a strong and gusty winds. Having no sense and nothing better to do, we decided to head over to Afton Alps, as planned. We took a run or two and then heading right into the lodge to thaw out (one time when a short vertical is actually a blessing). I think we repeated that cycle 3 or 4 times before calling it quits for the evening.

It was worth doing once, but having been there and done it, I think I will pass on ever doing it again. Not that I have the opportunity these days. Very seldom gets that cold here in Boise.

Skiing--always good but not always great.
post #15 of 29
-15 is a warm day up at Tremblant in January.

It has been nasty the past two MLK day weekends.

At night the temps would approach -38 with the wind chill.
post #16 of 29
well, my golf league has a history of bringing rain and my patrol night has more than its share of minus 10 or below temps. Dress properly and it is not too bad. I will second the "short vertical is a good thing" on those nights---couple of runs and go in to warm up.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd
Sometime in the early to mid-70’s ... It was a time when short skis and freestyle encouraged bad technique...tried to emulate the latest freestyle weirdness...
Ok, I got to confess....I tried to do "Ballet on skis" AKA freestyle, I did pretty good too. The problem was, we used to take the rentals out to do the stuff because they were short (GLM). The real problem was that they had spademan bindings and with our boots we had to use plates. We were a bunch of "punks" always pulling pranks on each other. Just before I went to attempt a "tip stand"(some called it a tip roll) my cousin kindly pulled the springs up enough so that when I went into the "tip stand" they would open and my feet would slide right out of the ski.

For those who do not know, Spademan bindings had 2 brass prongs mid sole of the boot that closed with a spring at the back, there was NOTHING holding the toe in place and really nothing holding the heel. If that spring was opened the prongs opened up like butterfly wings to allow the skier to slide the ski off. We had safety straps (runaway straps) on the skis. They kept the ski with you if the ski released.

You should have seen us trying to explain my "accident" to the owner...I was not an employee and I didn't rent them, so I shouldn't have even had the skis.

ALSO, during these same years....One night after skiing, a friend of mine who was helping out the patrol gave me his id to hold (the drinking age was 18 still and everyone was allowed in the lounge). I thought I'd be nice and have a couple beer waiting when he came in. I walked up to the bar, OLD, Blind, "Crazy Bob" was at the bar. I asked for 2 drafts and he asked for an ID, I showed him TJ's and he served me. As I was walking from the bar, who walks in but my dad.

Dear old dad didn't say anything to me, or to Bob, but boy did I catch hell when I got home.


***I forgot to mention, I had just turned 17. The ID I used to "buy" the beer was TJ's, he had just turned 18. He was 6'3" and had dark brown, short hair. I was 5'9" and had light brown medium to long hair.
post #18 of 29
I learned to ski in the 70's at Victor Constant Ski Area, at West Point, NY. My dad taught math there and I loved the fact that there was a ski slope (albeit a tiny one) on the base. The ski area consisted of a rope-tow on the Bunny Slope and a t-bar that fed the main run. The main run had an upper section and a lower section.

My parents let me ski there every day in the winter but only on one condition: I wasn't allowed to go to the upper section. I had to get off the t-bar at the midpoint. This was my first year skiing and my parents, who didn't ski, were a bit paranoid. Additionally, the area had absolutely no grooming so the upper, steeper section did grow some major bumps when they got good snow or made a bunch. Not wanting to blow my chance to ski every day, I obeyed.

One Saturday, they got over a foot of snow. That was huge for this tiny little hill in NY and most people wouldn't even drive the few blocks to get there. My best friend and I grabbed our gear and walked to the area. We were shocked to find it open and that we were the only ones there. Woohoo!

After two runs, my friend says "We HAVE to go up top." I told him I couldn't. Two runs later he's at it again and I finally agreed. We skied top-to-bottom all day and never saw another soul except the lift op.

By the time the lifts closed, the roads were cleared so we hopped on the post shuttle and rode it home. I didn't even make it to the front door before it whipped open and there was my mom. "I TOLD YOU NOT TO GO TO THE TOP!" she bellowed.

To this day, I have no clue how she found out and she still won't tell me. It was weeks before I could ski again too
post #19 of 29
One day, a loong time ago when I was a teenager, while skiing alongside my uncle-on a red- I opened his bindinings heel pieces...both at the same time...The resulting snowball was monumental.
Also, we used to open heel bindings to rude people on the lift queue, particularly if their bindings were "old" Tyrolia...With those the "attack" would go virtually un-detected until the person were to unload the heel piece as if when making to push forward with the poles...at that point the heel piece would spring open....
post #20 of 29
I know it's been a few days, but may I ask what a red trail is like? I've only heard of the green, blue and black here in the states. Thought maybe it was different in Italy?
post #21 of 29
Lilskier, a red piste/trail is a medium difficulty groomed run. I beleive what a "normal" black or blueblack is in the USA, or at least this is what I came to understand during my stay here...
In Italy the colour classification ranges from green (easiest) to black (hardest)...
But it's too station subjective...as, guess, it's everywhere in the world.
Recently I've started to notice orange/black signed runs, these are nongroomed-unpatrolled in-resort runs (look at Madesimo ski site map...)
post #22 of 29
And, I wouldn't advice anyone to try that...I was lucky that my uncle did not got injuried ...nevertheless my mom decided I needed a good "grooming" , ahem, let's put it that way.
post #23 of 29
I have a few

I am on my first trip out west. My buddy lends me his Rossi 3g's for the trip(I skied the hart f17's at the time a bump ski) He had fitted the skis to my boots but not adjusted the dins that were at 2! Of course I did not look. I was buzzing with excitement as I descended a groomer at breckenridge with my friend and his parents who were there at the time. Suddenly we cut over to a short and steep bump run. I am an eastern skier who likes to hit bumps hard! which is exactly what I did, I probably got 20 feet of air head first and my skis were sitting nicely on the first bump. My buddies parents still tell that story.

Sitting in the sun on a 60 degree day on the back of Alpine meadows at the, "Ice Bar" throwing snowballs at people who skied by to the delights and cheers of the drunk crowd whenever a skier was hit.

When we were like 14 grabbing cream packets from the cafeteria, breaking them open and throwing them down on unsuspecting skiers below.

Skiing one of the best college days ever. Sunny and sixty after a wonderful snow season and the storm of the century in 1993 at Killington. Everyone was out, it was that kind of day. Some jerk I hated went and did a pretty nice jump. That fired me up and I tried to launch it huge. This jump had a big transition and I hit it at speed and tried to push off as much as I could, bad idea. Next thing I know in the air my body just wants to go forward. I swing my arms wildly to counteract the momentum, which works, until I land.....
I end up with a huge gash in my chin from my knee. It was funny later on when the SKi Ambassadors told me to slow down and I bitched at them and they pointed out by the bloody gash on my chin that I better chill out.

Alfonse
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

Bad...bad...Senior Year in HS. Got my pass taken away from my mother (long story), Skipped school to go skiing (see no. 1), was at Camelback after coming down Hump went into the woods because we made a nice jump back to the trail, as I came out, I (blindly) turned a heli..3/4 the way through it...my skis went right into the chest of a ski patroller. ooof...No pass..skipping school...skiing "reckelss"...The day ended Hellish.

Bad...good...Last year out at A-Basin...last day of my vacation and of the ski year...dropping off of the Cornice. I was consistantly dropping 20ish feet than the last run in I didn't realize how fast I was going...Boy was I in the air along time I was up long enough to get week knees in the air..when I landed I was shaking...Had to drop 25-30 feet. what a rush it was. Maybe for you guys who are there all the time, its not alot..but for us flatlanders who don't get the chance but once a year.. it was Hellish

 

 

Ha! bump...If this was posted today, it would run another 1000 posts and talk about the skier responsibility code. History would be changed.

 

Hard to believe as you approach 40K posts, you were ever under 1000.  Anyway, almost 10 years since this thread was started.  I wonder what hellish things members have done since?


Edited by Cirquerider - 3/26/14 at 2:37pm
post #25 of 29

Probably bushwhacking around an overgrown back country area full of saplings in thigh deep snow but the 1" saplings were too tight together to really ski around but thick enough to take your skis out when you hit them.  Also, I was on 66mm 179 cm bump skis at the time.  Freakin' Hell-arious! There's video of it posted somewhere around here from a BK gathering a few years back..

post #26 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
 

 

 

Ha! bump...If this was posted today, it would run another 1000 posts and talk about the skier responsibility code. History would be changed.

 

Hard to believe as you approach 40K posts, you were ever under 1000.  Anyway, almost 10 years since this thread was started.  I wonder what hellish things members have done since?

How the HELL (see what I did there;)) did you find this thread. 

post #27 of 29

Diggin' up zombies.  It's what I do.

post #28 of 29
I remember the original post by Phil. Unbelievable it was 10 years ago now. Lot's of posters in that thread that we no longer hear from. Anyway great nostalgia to go back.
post #29 of 29

Throwback Thursday Thread of the Day?  Let's revive this demon.

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