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Prevent / Get rid of rust

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Besides wiping down your skis, is there another to prevent rust from forming on the edge of your skis? Also, when rust comes, whats the best way to get rid of it? Thanks!
post #2 of 17
from S.O. - (significant other) who just gave me this hint:

you can wipe em down but snow will melt out of the bindings and there is rust. rub a bar of wax across the edges after wiping down.

and for GOODNESS SAKE if you have an open rack, put em in a BAG. road salt is BAD for skis. boyfreind and I were amazed at the number of cars we see with open racks and skis hanging out. He told me if I were ever to do that id be tuning my OWN skis!
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Linda,
Thanks for the tip... I've abandoned my rack altogether and started folding down the back seat... much nicer... ANy thoughts on how to remove rust if it does pile up?

Thanks : [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #4 of 17
Use a gummy stone to remove rust from your edges. Get a soft one (gray), rub it on the edges, rust will come off.

YA
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
nice.. my roomate suggested a Brillo pad... I like your idea much better
post #6 of 17
yes, a gummi stone, I have one from swix that is nice.

of course, the folding down the back seat doesnt work if you are on 270s and drive a Geo Metro!

I didn't mean to sound so testy, (just reread my post) just expressing exasperation at so many people I see with nice and expensive skis tied like a damsel on railroad tracks to the top of the car collecting salt and grime and all manner of nasty, wax ruining, edge rusting, ski eating material.

Love your skis. they will love you in return. [img]graemlins/angel.gif[/img]
post #7 of 17
(de-tune the edges first, they can be a little sharp.) [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by LindaA:

... just expressing exasperation at so many people I see with nice and expensive skis tied like a damsel on railroad tracks to the top of the car collecting salt and grime and all manner of nasty, wax ruining, edge rusting, ski eating material.

Especially when the skis are lying on the open rack separately one from the other with bases down... Or together, but tips forward... :

BTW, speaking about ski bags: when it's raining, and the trip is long, won't it be worse for the edges? Considering the preservation of wetness by the bag, I mean...

[ March 19, 2003, 02:10 PM: Message edited by: AlexG ]
post #9 of 17
hmmm, perhaps...but no different than being in a roof box or back of the suv, especially if the bag is waterproof, and the skis have been wiped down and wax applied to the edges.(not expensive wax, juat a bar of cheap stuff will do.) . at least you wont be scraping salt, tar (pothole patches this time of year!) and dead bugs (and god knows what else) out of your bases.

Unfortunately, its just a fact of life due to the nature of the sport, rust happens. but it shouldn't be too excessive, nothing that a good tune or a gummi stone between tunings cant fix.

I especially love those racks that attach to the back of the car, where the skis stick straight up (behind the vehicle no less) with the bases facing outward. these people should be drawn and quartered for ski abuse. : or made to tune a shop full of rental skis.....

[ March 19, 2003, 02:28 PM: Message edited by: LindaA ]
post #10 of 17
If you put skis on the rack at least get those nylon covers for the bindings to keep the road salt off them. How do you clean a binding? You generally don't. If the skis are waxed, I don't see how the base is going to be all that harmed just on top of the car. Wipe them down when you get to the destination!
To protect the edges you can also use that Toko edge protect that comes in a magic marker type container. (I've never tried it though)
post #11 of 17
I always carry skis inside the vehicle unless forced by the shear number of occupants to put them in the top rack (and then always in a dry bag).

I always wipe skis down with a towel when I get home, then lean them against a wall base outward. After a day of drying that way, I flip them upside down (tip down), then right them and lean them back up against the wall base outward again to get all residual water out of the cupped areas in the binding. Only after another day of drying will I store them base to base in a dry ski bag.

If I'm skiing the same pair the next day, they go base to base with a separator clip between them for the trip back to the hill.

If I have to carry skis in rack on the way home from the hill, they are always in the bag, with separators.

Best hints I know to prevent rust:

NEVER leave wet skis in a wet bag for any more time than you have to! And ALWAYS turn a wet bag inside out and let it dry thoroughly before using again!

Buy a few extra bags for your quiver so that you can alternate while some are still wet. The investment is well worth it.

Wipe skis down every time you bring them in.
post #12 of 17
I see high criticism on the board about carrying skis on open racks.
I think it is not such a crime to do this, unless, may be, you
are going to keep skis for many many years(>2 for me, but who keeps them so long nowadays?).
I always carry skis on open rack and never had any problems
with skis/binding performance.
Just think about abuse you apply to skis while skiing a hill
and compare this to carrying them on rack.
post #13 of 17
>...I always carry skis on open rack and never had any problems...

Different geographic areas, differences in traffic density, differences in salt usage by the local DOT, slush producing temperatures that hover around freezing, different driving habits (eg, always driving up in the middle of a storm), different driving distances, etc. all lead to very different experiences with a conventional open ski rack.

Around here, on those days when you *really* want to be heading for the hills (ie, during a storm), by the time you got to the ski area, a pair of skis in an open roof-top rack will often be so completely encrusted with dirt and salt that you can't even make out the topsheet graphics through the mung.

Putting aside the issue of all this gritty, corrosive stuff getting inside the bindings, if you tried to ski on them in this condition, you simply wouldn't move because of the buildup of abrasive dirt on the bases. So, you wind up having to do an annoying and filthy cleaning job twice per trip - once, when you arrive at the mountain, before you can even start skiing, and once when you get back home. They can be so badly coated that you really just want to hose them down, but of course, (a) your outdoor hose at home is frozen this time of year, and (b) this will tend to drive the lubricants out of the moving parts inside the binding. Put up with this every weekend for three months out of every year, and the negatives of a conventional ski rack become a major PITA.

All these problems simply disappear with a roof top ski box.

Hope this helps you understand why your experiences might be quite different than that of other people.

Tom / PM

[ March 20, 2003, 10:55 PM: Message edited by: PhysicsMan ]
post #14 of 17
igorig, I kept my last pair of skis 10+ years... (and yes there was still plenty of camber left; Dynastar race skis).

I do carry my skis on a rack. Not the tips first [img]smile.gif[/img] But not always with a bag, but always with a binding cover (a good spend of $9). There is no road salt where I go, and my bases are fine after the short trip to the slopes even when uncovered.

I am buying a couple unpadded ski bags to put on the rack, and will keep the padded one for transport until I get a dual sportube.

I do take very good care of the skis after skiing and when coming home, not only wiping them but also deburring the edges.

YA
post #15 of 17
Does anyone know where I can get binding covers that are generous in girth? I used to put binding covers on all the time but my new skis have plates and high heel pieces and now I can't fully close the zipper over the bindings
post #16 of 17
try a racing supply shop...Reliable is a good one. most racers have plates and lifts and what not...

i guess its relative, like physicsman said, where you live, driving conditions, etc. and Im particular abut my wax job, perhaps even anal, I guess that matters too. Other people, Racers, for example,do everything they can to be fast, including immaculate wax and edges.

I have a racer boyfriend who does my skis every time I go out, and I know he is especially concerned with his wax, brushing between runs, etc... and ive seen some nasty stuff get scraped off during the cleaning stage of the tune...not sure just a wipe would take care of whatever gets imbedded in the wax.

of course, if you wax your skis once or twice a season...guess you arent as concerned... [img]tongue.gif[/img] or anal as I am but I would think youd want to be especially careful about it...

or as lucky as I am, to have such a great buddy to tune em!!

(Im not gloating, really...gloat gloat)

[ March 21, 2003, 10:05 AM: Message edited by: LindaA ]
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by ahimanic:
Does anyone know where I can get binding covers that are generous in girth? I used to put binding covers on all the time but my new skis have plates and high heel pieces and now I can't fully close the zipper over the bindings
The Rossignol ones are supposed to have been enlarged recently for that reason (and very wide skis) but I don't have plates so I can't vouch for it.

YA
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