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Hey, tuning geeks!!

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
So let's hear what your favorite pieces of turning gear are.

What works hands down better than the rest. We want names, models, prices, and sources for purchase. What's the best bevel tool? What's the best side wall plane? Best irons or vices? How about stones and files? Any home made tool ideas? How about the best deals on supplies? Any secret home bru wax formulas?

Come on guys, give it up!
post #2 of 22
Skisharps Skivision beveling tool. $49.95 at Tognar. This tool is simple & fast. It does as good a job as I'll ever need for skiing in Montana.
post #3 of 22
You need edges in Montana?
post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taylormatt
You need edges in Montana?
Some of the best days are what we jokenly call 'icy' days. It is hard to resist hundreds of acres of empty slope in any condition especially when its as easy to ski as Montana ice is.
post #5 of 22
Edges-
- 1 degree Beast base edge file guide. Simple and relatively accurate.
- 3 (93) degree Sidecut Racing side edge file guide. Steel plate on bottom so filings don't get pressed into the base.
- FK Sidewall stripper. Simple and keeps the files clean.
- Swix diamond stones. Seem to last a little longer for me than the DMT stones.
- 3 (93) degree SVST Progressive edge tool. Makes edge polishing a little quicker since you don't have to change stones.
- SVST Secret Sauce. Keeps the files cutting longer.
Wax-
- Swix T73 Iron. Thick, wide base for good heat control.
- Dr D's Wicked Wax- Cheap fluro powder and wax.
- Swix CH and LF wax- great training/base wax depending on conditions.
- Toko/Swix base prep and moly wax- good for base prep.
- Holmenkohl bronze brushes. Just right for CH-6/7 waxes and are well sized.
- Swix T0149-30 ski vices. Do the job.

That's what I use on a semi-regular basis. I have a whole lot of stuff I don't use for various reasons. I can't remember where I got it or how much it cost, and I really don't want to think about it.
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Mike
I can't remember where I got it or how much it cost, and I really don't want to think about it.
post #7 of 22
The most incredible tuning I've ever seen was at the top of the Gondola at Stowe last season. There was a discarded piece of equipment just outside the building that included an ancient and very thoroughly rusted piece of angle iron that is appearently a highly sophisticated edge polishing tool. I know this because I witnessed a skier fine tune his edges by applying them to it at a 45 deg. angle (like this ><)and then methodically make four passes back and forth on each from the toe piece on the binding to the tip.

So clearly, Alaska Mike, you must have spent entirely too much, since edge tuning equipment can be found lying around anywhere for free
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgeib
So clearly, Alaska Mike, you must have spent entirely too much, since edge tuning equipment can be found lying around anywhere for free
I won't dispute that I've paid too much. It's a hazard of being a gear whore. I think I have a piece of rusted angle iron in the garage, so maybe my race prep will change this season. Then again, maybe not...
post #9 of 22
I have too much tuning stuff to list.

Personally my favorate tools are my SVST 93 edge guide and my Moonflex diamond stones. I also want to try Dominator Zoom wax this year which I know alot of people here use. I have been using Swix CH7 but I was unhappy with it's cold weather durability last year.

Race-werks used to be the only place to get Moonflex in the US but Artech now has them and everything they have is slightly cheaper then Race-werks.
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Mike
I won't dispute that I've paid too much. It's a hazard of being a gear whore...
Yes, I know ...I've encountered the same hazard
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
I have too much tuning stuff to list.
Race-werks used to be the only place to get Moonflex in the US but Artech now has them and everything they have is slightly cheaper then Race-werks.
R-W's catalog seems somewhat smaller than in previous years. ?

Has anyone built their own hotbox? If so, what did you use for heater and controls?
post #12 of 22
It's simple. Moonflex stones, Dominator Hyper Zoom wax, SVST edge guide, Red Creek Roto Brushes.
post #13 of 22
My Montana GM-U.
post #14 of 22
Phil's got me beat. Then again, he did get a screaming deal.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by bolide
Has anyone built their own hotbox? If so, what did you use for heater and controls?
What's a hotbox?
post #16 of 22
My tuning geer consists of a thin piece of plastic about 2"x 3" with 2 overlapping circles in the lower right corner and a bunch of raised numbers on it. It's amazing the job that little piece of plastic can do.
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
What's a hotbox?
I believe there is an old "hot box" in the rental shop at the ski area I work at. It is not used anymore, it just sits there on the shelf. I hope they didn't throw it out last year when they cleaned up. If I can get my hands on it I will. If I do it may just go to one lucky person here.

I added a picture below, is this what you are talking about? We used to call it the hot box.
post #18 of 22
I popped my head in here because I was hopeful to learn a thing or two about actually doing the tuning. I have been using the "skierteach" method - MASTERCARD. My ski house this winter has a really nice built-in tuning bench and I figure it's high time that I learn to do it for myself.

Whatcha got for me oh wise ones???

thanks,
kiersten
post #19 of 22
There are tons of posts here and someone even had a step by step last year with pictures.

I know SkiDoc is going to start posting some instructional tips and tricks soon.

I would call him at PTC and see if you can setup a time to go see him.

I read plenty of books on tuning but it really helps to have someone show you in person. I "practiced" on my old skis but if you have nice skis I would get some hands on instruction.
post #20 of 22
Hot boxes as I understand them are heated boxes you put the skis in so the wax penetrates more completely. Kinda like a ski oven. Last time I saw one used was for race prep on skis. Most people just wax their skis and let them sit overnight to allow the wax to sink in. If it's built wrong I can see a hot box drying out the skis. Seems like it would be more trouble and take up more room than it would be worth for anyone below the Europa Cup level. I'm not sure they still use them for anything other than speed events anymore.

The picture teachskiljp posted is what we call a hot roller. It's a semi-automatic waxer. We use a similar one on the rental fleet at the local hill at the beginning of the season. Does a quick, if not all that great, job of waxing a lot of skis. We've had them burn skis if the ski gets stuck and the tech isn't paying attention. The wax doesn't really penetrate all that well, but it's better than nothing. I've seen them go for around $75 on eBay.
post #21 of 22
Side of Beast side edge bevel guide, base edge bevel guide similar to Beast, but made of metal instead of plastic, Stanley steel cabinet scraper, Ski Visions base planer and structure tool, true bar, various files and diamond stones and gummi stones, Profi ski vise with a plastic boot dummy to hold skis on the vise via the bindings. I don't use the base planer much any more, instead I usually use a combination of the steel scraper and various files to flatten the base and square up edges before resetting the bevels. The most used tools are the vise and DMT and gummi stones. The vise is pretty stable, but it was originally sold when skis were straight and narrow. Looking at the current version in Tognar's catalog it does not look like they have updated it to provide a wider platform for working on wider skis. Also have a Ptex iron for base repair, sort of like a low temp soldering iron.

For wax, I have been using a hydrocarbon Vola wax, blue for freezing down to all but the coldest conditions, gold for spring. I got the wax from a Vola rep who had a garage full of the stuff. Its probably 15 years old, but it glides really fast, lasts a long time, and has a wide temperature range. I don't think Vola is sold anymore in the US, but it is available in Canada, Europe, and Japan.
post #22 of 22
"Side of Beast" side edge bevel guide
"Base Beast" base bevel guides
various brands of diamond stones (fine and medium)
gummi stone
Swix waxes and various plastic scapers
Swix, Beast and Holmenkohl brushes
Swix iron
Fibertex and Omni Prep pads
Beast vice and tuning table
rubber bands
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