or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Tuning - Wintersteiger vs. hand tuning
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tuning - Wintersteiger vs. hand tuning - Page 3

post #61 of 81
What is your point then?

A tune in the East is more important then on the West regardless of the skiers ability.

An expert on pencil skis with rounded edges would not have a fun time going down a steep icey run.

No amount of feathering would help.
post #62 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightingale
A good Western skier who skis 50+ days a year could pick up a pair of straight skis at a thrift store in Denver, go to his local mountain and SHRED the Eastern tourist on his $1000 skis with the $100 tune..
Likely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
Have that Western skier come to the East Coast and try that.
Why the hell would the Western skier want to ski the Ice Coast?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
What is your point then?

A tune in the East is more important then on the West regardless of the skiers ability.

An expert on pencil skis with rounded edges would not have a fun time going down a steep icey run.
I agree 100%!

-------------

The point is that it's not the cureall. It matters a lot for some conditions and types of skiing and not at all for other conditions and types of skiing.

There is more to skiing than the rigid "even beginners need the 0.98297deg edge bevel" technical dorked attitude that gave skiing a bad image for so long and still persists to drive new snowsliders to choose boarding over skiing. If that wasn't bad enough, we have a shameless egotistical self promoting technical dork... no... that's not nice... a Ski Surgeon.... who won't admit to his own motives or that his type drives Little Johnny to choose knuckledragging over skiing.

People should know that there is more out there to do in the lifestyle of skiing and it is within their reach! That is what growing the sport is all about.

What else do you think I get out of this (other than the privelage to read Atomic's and SkiDoc's posts, which, despite what you might think, put a smile on my face)?
post #63 of 81

Ski Doc knows his stuff

Quote:
Originally Posted by Summit
I don't care what other people think about me, especially on the internet. Why are you all worked up, honeybuns?

I can tell that either you haven't skied non-boilerplate or you are intentionally bullshitting about the importance of tuning because it's your profession.
Jeez, I thought I was the only one bomb-throwing on this forum. However, I must say Summit is wrong in his attack on Ski Doc. I talked to Ski Doc back when he was at Volkl. His advice on ski selection (model and length) and tuning (bevel angles) led to my first Nastar gold medal and my wife's improvement from beginner to strong intermediate. Having had a brand new pair of skis ruined in one tune, I think having a competent professional handling my skis is paramount. My P50 GC Racing Stocks are going to PTC!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Summit
Global warming? Nuclear war will happen first... then we get nuclear winter: year round skiing, super dumps, and snow that glows in the dark for night skiing.
Ok, I agree with you on this point, Summit. I've read that the technology for synthetic snow production at 40 - 50 degrees F is already a reality. Right now, it's just too expensive to be feasible, but so were calculators in the 70s. Technology always seems to pull us through as long as ObL doesn't get us first.
post #64 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjdow
His advice on ski selection (model and length) and tuning (bevel angles) led to my first Nastar gold medal ... My P50 GC Racing Stocks are going to PTC!!!
Are you sure your racing ability didn't play some part in that?

Nobody disputes the importance of ski and tune to racers. Nobody disputes that a dope smoking trust funder can burn an edge or stone grind out your edges or bases in mere seconds. Nobody disputes that Volkl absolutely rules.

Is it valid to equate ski tuners with open heart surgeons? I'd say that might just be a disputable point...
post #65 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Summit
Are you sure your racing ability didn't play some part in that?

Nobody disputes the importance of ski and tune to racers. Nobody disputes that a dope smoking trust funder can burn an edge or stone grind out your edges or bases in mere seconds. Nobody disputes that Volkl absolutely rules.

Is it valid to equate ski tuners with open heart surgeons? I'd say that might just be a disputable point...
Maybe, but his advice gave me the perfect ski and size to maximize my ability in the gates. I think a good tune is extremely important for racing and a necessity for skiing in New England. For my non-race skis (well, they are still racing skis, just not Race Stock), I usually get a tune every ten ski days and touch up my bases and edges with SkiVisions tools. I wax using a Hertel roller/iron after every ski day.

Volkls definitely rule. I'd like to try some Stocklis, too, but I'm very happy on the Volkls. For New England conditions, I feel the perfect ski is the P50 Slalom Carver from a few years back in the longest 177cm length (I'm 200 lbs, 6'). They stopped making this length as they brought on the SuperSports and radicalized the P60 SC's sidecut. It's funny. In Europe, all the shops had 177cm P50 SCs and they said their customers preferred them to the SuperSports. European ski resorts have a lot of similarities to New England when it comes to snow conditions.

I think the comparison to heart surgeons was tongue-in-cheek.
post #66 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjdow
I wax using a Hertel roller/iron after every ski day.
How do those work?

Do you iron the ski after applying the wax?

Does the ski still have wax in the afternoon?
post #67 of 81
Summit et al,

"...who still manage to have an orgasmic time on the SNOW..."

Exactly. If you ski on hero snow all the time nothing matters except an occasional wax. If you ski where most of us do (by necessity/desperation), tunes are much more important. Why is that so hard for you to understand?
post #68 of 81

Hertel Hot Roller Waxer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
How do those work?

Do you iron the ski after applying the wax?

Does the ski still have wax in the afternoon?
I've had it for years. I use it to keep the bases from drying out and oxidizing and it seems to have worked. I imagine a lot of the wax is absorbed by the base, but at the end of the day, there are still patches of wax on the tips and ends of the tails and sometimes in the groove (if the skis have the center groove).

For racing, I imagine it has little value, but to protect your bases, it seems great. I run the skis over the roller, which sits in a hot tray, put the skis on the bench, scrape lightly with a pass of the SkiVisions base flattener, then the plastic scraper, then brush with a brass brush. It's very easy and doesn't create much mess and there is no smoke. I'm interested if anyone else uses this device and what they think.
post #69 of 81
do tunes matter?

we ski mostly in the east, occasionally in summit country or Utah.

-- I give my wife's Volkl's the full tune and she is happy. Should I skip them when the pile of race skis is too high she notices.

I have found that when she is happy my life is WAY better. so as far as I am concerned a good consistent tune is essential--
post #70 of 81
There is always excess wax at the tip and tails if you didn't scrape it all off.

I just want an easier way to wax then using an iron but that is better then corking it.

I saw one on Ebay but I don't want to pay alot for something that is old and not produced anymore.

I slightly burnt my base last year and I am always careful so I wanted something quicker and easier with less risk of damaging the base.
post #71 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjdow
Volkls definitely rule. I'd like to try some Stocklis, too, but I'm very happy on the Volkls. For New England conditions, I feel the perfect ski is the P50 Slalom Carver from a few years back in the longest 177cm length (I'm 200 lbs, 6').
I have P40 Slalom Carvers in 177 from 2000 I think (145# 5'6") and while I do like them a lot, I'll probably go with something shorter this year. I've been looking around at 70 to 75 ish waist skis for a change this time out. Have not decided on what yet.
post #72 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j
I have P40 Slalom Carvers in 177 from 2000 I think (145# 5'6") and while I do like them a lot, I'll probably go with something shorter this year. I've been looking around at 70 to 75 ish waist skis for a change this time out. Have not decided on what yet.
I have a P50 Slalom Carver in 177 and a P50 SC Racing in 170. The SC in 170 is a blast, but I feel the SL Carver in 177 is more versatile for skiing all over the mountain.
post #73 of 81

Machines can't compare to a hand tune.

post #74 of 81

^^  A ten-year thread bump, is this a new record..? :eek 

post #75 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveV View Post
 

^^  A ten-year thread bump, is this a new record..? :eek 


Could be.  I don't know, but it's still shows on an internet search!  ;)

post #76 of 81

As you can see, I'm not down with machines for edge tuning.  I see lots of skis that are wasted from machine edge tuning,  Worst is when they waste the base edge by way over beveling it with a machine. :hopmad: 

post #77 of 81

BTW, I ski several pairs that are old as or older than this thread.  They still have life because they have not been tuned by a frickin' machine!

post #78 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveV View Post

^^  A ten-year thread bump, is this a new record..? eek.gif  

It's apparently Jacques' mission to include one of his videos on every tuning thread ever created in Epic. No tuning thread will ever be allowed to pass into archives, even if the skis had wood bases and dope and pine tar were the miracle ingredients for glide.
post #79 of 81

I guess old threads never die?

post #80 of 81

Nope. They just go downhill........ :D

post #81 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post
 

Nope. They just go downhill........ :D


Yes! Downhill is what we like!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Tuning - Wintersteiger vs. hand tuning