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ski recommendation for Eastern powder/trees/crud

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I'm STILL looking around for another ski to compliment my 170cm 02/03 Atomic R9 (72mm waist) with Marker Piston 1200 bindings for Eastern skiing. I love this ski on groomed and in fresh powder, but they are just too light to comfortable handle crud and chopped-up snow. The conversation about the Mojo in the East made me think if I should be looking at skis with less width underfoot than the Mojo. If such a ski exists, I am looking for one that can blast through crud, doesn't weigh too much, isn't useless on hardpack, and can turn fast enough for tight tree skiing. Any and all recommendations would be appreciated (I was considering last year's Axis XP) since I want to make the most out of my first year skiing in the (North) East.

For background, I am 5'11", will be 170-175lbs by ski season, an upper intermediate/lower expert in skill (I haven't found anything in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic that I can't handle), and am a 24 year old male. Thanks again for the recommendations.
post #2 of 24
I am out west, but I think the R:EX is what you should look at. That ski kicks a$$. But then again I am an Atomic fan. I have Bandits for the conditions you are describing, but they are pretty well worthless on the hardpack. Just got some new R:9s for the wife and some carvers for myself.
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
All the reviews I hear about the Rex is that it rocks in crud, but doesn't like short turns. I've thought about it, but let me know if you think it would be agreeable to slower tight turns in trees.
post #4 of 24
I have been essentially looking for what you are talking about but I want them to be good in the bumps also.

I used to ski on 03/04 Atomic R11s which IMO were heavy but solid skis. They were alot of work for me in the bumps. I have never skied on the 02/03 R9s so I can't really compare.

I now have Atomic Metron XIs which are lighter, have way more float, and still rip on the groomed. They have alot of sidecut which bothers me in crud and in the bumps but you may love them.

See if you can demo them.
post #5 of 24
I really like my Crossmax 10's for such conditions. My 1080's are also good for these conditions, but the CM's are much more agile in the trees/bumps on those heavy days. Dynastar Skicross may be a good choice too. I personally don't care for the Bandits, B1's or K2 Axis, but that's just my personal opinion, you may want to look at them too.


I have a similar situation as you, I like my Rossi Cobras as an all around ski, but if it's heavy and cruddy, they get tossed around too easily like your R9's. I grab the 1080's or CM's depending on what I plan to ski that day.
post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 
I was thinking about 1080s since 80mm is about what I'm looking for, but I've heard that they are a little on the light side, which I desire, but what do you have to say about their crud performance? Thanks for the input.
post #7 of 24
I have the older model 77 waisted. They absolutely BLAST through garbage, although they are lighter than my Crossmax 10 Pilots. I can't comment on the newer 1080's but I doubt they are much different.


As I've said before though, they are not the most agile ski, therefore I don't prefer them in the trees/bumps in any conditions to my Crossmax's or Cobras.
post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 
Crud performance without giving up too much in trees and on hardpack is my top priority since I love my R9s for everything but crud. The R9s are too light to blast through crud so I get really tired working those skis through garbage. Thanks agian for the input and hopefully I'll get more comments on the 1080s for this purpose.
post #9 of 24
What about something like the Volkl 724 Pro, 77mm underfoot and just about blasts through anything.
post #10 of 24
I REALLY believe if you want a great bump/tree ski in the East, today's fat twins are not the best choice.


Twins are fun, they have their place, but to me tight spots are not it. You can use them, but there are far better tools for the job on the market.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taylormatt
I REALLY believe if you want a great bump/tree ski in the East, today's fat twins are not the best choice.


Twins are fun, they have their place, but to me tight spots are not it. You can use them, but there are far better tools for the job on the market.
Wow. My feeling on that is the exact opposite of yours. I really like a fat twin for Eastern tree skiing.Pocket Rockets, Karmas, Mojos, whatever. Granted, you can go too fat. My Gotamas are some work in the bumps, and too soft for crud, but when it dumps they sure are nice to have.
post #12 of 24
Epic,


I think a lot of that is dictated by how you like to ski and personal taste. Like I said, I can use them, but prefer a more agile ski for my style. I also think people looking to "get into the trees" for the first time would do better on a ski that's easier to maneuver in the trees. It builds confidence IMO. That said, I'm not the strogest bump skier, I'll take the easier stix.

I liken my 1080's to autocrossing a 76 Broughm, lol. My other skis are more like a sport compact.
post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
K2 Axis XP skiiers, any comments. I hear that the XPs are pretty good in the crud and also a good all-around performer.
post #14 of 24

XP's

My personal experience with the XP's was that they were not as quick (short turns were hard work), as I think you would want for bumps and trees. Lots has been said about the Legend line from Dynastar. I know I love my Intuitiv 74 for those conditions. I didn't get to take the Volkl 724 Pro into the bumps, but I found it to be very quick and stable.
post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
Ummm, might I want the Dynastar Legend 8000? I read some reviews on it and it looks to fit the bill well.
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic
Wow. My feeling on that is the exact opposite of yours. I really like a fat twin for Eastern tree skiing.Pocket Rockets, Karmas, Mojos, whatever. Granted, you can go too fat. My Gotamas are some work in the bumps, and too soft for crud, but when it dumps they sure are nice to have.
I love my Gotamas in tree skiing. Pretty short @183, really fat, very easy to ski on.

My actual favourite ski for the east was the old volkl g31. I found it to be the best overall ski I had ever been on. (IMHO of course). Fast, faster, fastest (I don't really do slow), hard pack and soft, they seemed to do it all.
post #17 of 24
I like my Elan 662 (now 666) for conditions you describe.
post #18 of 24
Hello Andrew,

Try checking my post on the Volkl 6 Star Piston Motion from about the first week of December, 2003. This is one of my all-time favorite ski and binding setups, had nothing but fun on them.

To get what this ski has to offer definitely requires a professionally done aggressive tune. It's fairly versatile for a narrower stiffer harder snow carver, terrific edge hold, and a little more forgiving than most skis of this genre. It's not for "stronger intermediates" or someone needing a ski to "grow into", etc. - for that, the 5 Star is probably a more reasonable choice. The Marker Piston Motion system really does work very well as billed, in my opinion.

Before moving west, I spent more than enough time in the Great Lakes on smaller hills to have an idea of what northeastern conditions are about; more of the same most of the time, but with more vertical. Since using the 6 Stars probably 30% of the time this last season out west in variable conditions, (just because there's more snow and softer snow in the west doesn't mean that we never ski on hard conditions out here) I believe that it would be as good for an eastern ski as anything out there, and better than most.

Until recently, they were a tad expensive, especially if you needed the harder-to-find 182 cm length, but now that they've been around for over a year, the price has moderated somewhat. As usual, there are always quite a few people out there who decided that this ski wasn't for them, selling them used pretty cheap.

Hope this helps.

Smiles...
post #19 of 24
Voelkl G4 is the right choice for you if you want to go wider underfoot. Very versatile tool. Also 724 Pro if you can't get the G4.
post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
Time to be difficult... I got my first issue of Ski this weekend (the one w/ the useless ski tests) and it had a ski that looks like it might fit the bill - the Salomon Scrambler 8. The dimensions interest me - 125-75-110 (to the best of my memory), as does its supposed crud performance. I'd imagine that since it is a Salomon it should be relatively light and with those dimensions it should be adept at short turns (14.2m radius, I think). Anyway, I can't afford new skis now, but I'll sell some old skis off on Ebay and save up to buy something (maybe this one) at the end of the season to be cheap. Ragardless, if anyone has any info on the Salomon Scrambler it would be greatly appreciated - thanks.
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewschirmer
K2 Axis XP skiiers, any comments. I hear that the XPs are pretty good in the crud and also a good all-around performer.
I'm on an older pair ('02) of K2 Axis X Pros at 183 cm and they can blast through just about anything. Somewhat heavy, but very stable.
post #22 of 24
Volkl AX3's I have 10EX's and G3's took all three to Killington last March or early April. In fact it was the day of the level three exam. Skied all three on the same trail with an hour or so, just to see what I liked for the spring crud. Up until the AX3 the ski of choice was the EX. To my surprise I enjoyed the AX3 170cm much more then the EX's or G3's both are 177cm. I'm 190lbs 5' 11".

I tune my own skis after each day. I have posted here a number of times what a great bump ski the G3 and AX3 are. I have so much fun on them, it's hard to discribe.
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
a self-serving bump
post #24 of 24
Though it may be a ski which is too similar to your current R9, the Head i.M 75 Chip (74mm) @ 170cm is great in crud, trees, tight trees and bumps. Carves the groomed well and is surprisingly stable at speed for a 170. It's a heavy ski, but I had no trouble with quick fall-line turns on the groomed, bumps or steeps. (It's certainly not the most energetic ski on the groomed.) I'm a bit taller and heavier than you are (6'1" and 185 lbs) and probably somewhat more advanced in terms of skill based on your description.

I demo'ed the Heads for a day last December @ Jay Peak in all of the above conditions. Loved 'em. Note: The 177's are a completely different ski. The ease of turning is surprisingly more difficult with only a 7 cm increase in length.
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