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Trampolines for ski training

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I just moved into a new house, and the previous owners left me a large trampoline. I've spent quite a bit of time on it recently, and I was wondering what the benefits would be for alpine skiing- short of freestyle. I noticed several camps offer summer trampoline sessions for racers, but I haven't been able to find any specific drills.

I do a lot of side-to-side jumps and box pattern jumps, and it seems to help my overall balance, but they wear me out fairly quickly. 3 or 4 days a week I do cardio (eliptical)and strength (freeweights) training, so I'm hoping that this will enhance my dryland training.

Which sets of muscles am I working and are there any possible downsides to this kind of training?

-Mike
post #2 of 22
A whole bunch of houses in Summit County have trampolines in their back yard. You are working hamstrings and quads, both eccentrically and concentrically, as well as your gluteals. Of course, your deep core muscles are working for stabilization, and in you side to side movement, your abductors and adductors are engaged.

The only downsides occur if you are practicing any highly advanced tricks without a spotter.

The other possible downside is controversial. Since I have not formed an opinion on this issue, I let you know what has been researched. Then you can use your own judgement. There are some people who think that doing plyometric type training on a softer surface is not as effective as a harder surface, because you fail to get the ground reaction forces. In other words, the spring action of the tramploine is helping you get some height, so your muscles do not have to work as hard.

Again, this is just one opinion. Personally, I believe that for you, trampoline training would be a good way to combine cardio with functional training. It's obvious that its getting your heart rate up, and lateral balance training is always a good idea.

Anytime I add something to my regimen, I always like to take an objective look at what it does for ski specifc skills, once the season arrives. Sometimes there will be a form of training that I think will be great, but once on the slopes, I just see a marginal training affect. Sometimes I see a very specific correlation, as in Bosu training and bump skiing.

I'd be curious to hear some of your specifics once ski season starts.
post #3 of 22
I used this extensively for off season training for skiing. Great for body awareness in the air, athleticism, general coordination, reaction training.



Get a few friends and play ADD ON. First person does a trick; next person does that one and adds his own. Keep going till only one person has not dropped out.



Stand in the middle of the tramp and have a couple friends bounce around you trying to knock you off balance with their bouncing. Now try it in a tuck. Now close your eyes.
post #4 of 22
Quote:
There are some people who think that doing plyometric type training on a softer surface is not as effective as a harder surface
Empirical evidence suggests that bouncing on a trampoline is way more fun than bouncing on the ground. Can I come over and play, Mike?
post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by suebrown
Empirical evidence suggests that bouncing on a trampoline is way more fun than bouncing on the ground. Can I come over and play, Mike?
Personally, I agree 100% !

But not about coming over to play, I'm a happily married woman!
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
Personally, I agree 100% !

But not about coming over to play, I'm a happily married woman!
So am I, but I try not to let it hamper my fun!
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
My trampoline is your trampoline. Gee, if I knew it was such an effective way to pick up women, I would have gotten one a long time ago.

I have noticed that it doesn't seem to work the core muscles as much as I would have hoped- even when I'm actively retracting and extending. It does would the hell out of my calves. The springs don't allow me to link successive tricks like flips, mainly because they're not stong enough to get the height required, so right now I'm mainly doing movements that challenge my balance as much as possible. At any rate, it's fun and seems to be helping. My dogs seem to think it's fun too, although they use it mainly as another place to lay around. It kinda makes them mad when I start jumping and they have to get off. Oh well...
post #8 of 22
Hey Mike! You've got a tramploine and you're a man in uniform! Suprised that the girls are not flocking to you in droves!

Seriously, it's your deeper core muscles that are working, not the superficial ones. That's why you don't really feel them. But if you are keeping a relatively quiet upper body, your core muscles are engaged!
post #9 of 22
I always wondered why the call them TRAMPolines. Now I see. Draws them like flys!
post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
Lisamarie-
I am working on keeping a quiet upper body and maintaining an efficient arm position, so it's good to know that I'm actually working core muscles. I've always thought they were a weaker area that needed attention.
post #11 of 22
don't know if it works on big ones but one trainer had me running on a mini-tramp - then suddenly stop... try it on two feet - then the left - then the right.... when you feel happy about all have some one else call the stops at random (make yourself a tape on puter maybe?)
post #12 of 22
Let me see, two women bouncing on a trampoline huh?

Savor that thought.

Actually, my kid used the tramp quite a bit while training for the park. Flips, twists and such.

I still think the jump rope is an excellent way to condition for skiing. Especially for bump skiing.
post #13 of 22
Why is jumping rope so exhausting? How come I can ride a bike for hours, but only jump rope for a couple minutes (if that)?
post #14 of 22
For the same reason that bump skiing is exhausting but I think it simulates bump skiing better than anything else.

Picture your favorite bump run, then try to link fifty turns together. You can simulate this by jumping rope with your feet together, jumping side to side keeping your upper body and eyes looking straight ahead.

You're on the trail to better bumping when you can link 100 jumps-turns.

Believe me, this will help like no other exercize out there.
post #15 of 22
The Man Show.
post #16 of 22
2 questions:
1. What DIN setting should I use when ski training on a trampoline
2. Should I de-tune my edges to avoid tearing the trampoline?
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
For the same reason that bump skiing is exhausting but I think it simulates bump skiing better than anything else.

Picture your favorite bump run, then try to link fifty turns together. You can simulate this by jumping rope with your feet together, jumping side to side keeping your upper body and eyes looking straight ahead.

You're on the trail to better bumping when you can link 100 jumps-turns.

Believe me, this will help like no other exercize out there.
Hmm.. I never thought of that. Lars, would you recommend just doing standard rope jumping (not like I can do that), or also try to bring the knees up on each jump while doing the rope jump?

I guess another option is to simulate those turns (jumps) without the rope (then you can actually put your hands/arms on the right position.. and basically do a plyometric workout?

How about some exercises with the mini-tramps? (the little tiny ones). I'm sure those can't be used for practicing tricks, but I am wondering about using them for some sort of bump skiing workout... just not sure what or how yet.
post #18 of 22
Alaska Mike.

One tramp workout that they taught us at a recent bump camp (if you are into bumps) is to simulate zipper line bump turns on the tramp. Just bring knees up and down (and side to side) while keeping the upper body quiet. Very very difficult and tiring. I tried it and lasted like.. well.. it's embarrasing how quickly I got tired.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by suebrown
Why is jumping rope so exhausting? How come I can ride a bike for hours, but only jump rope for a couple minutes (if that)?
Try standing instead of sitting when you ride....
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
For the same reason that bump skiing is exhausting but I think it simulates bump skiing better than anything else.

Picture your favorite bump run, then try to link fifty turns together. You can simulate this by jumping rope with your feet together, jumping side to side keeping your upper body and eyes looking straight ahead.

You're on the trail to better bumping when you can link 100 jumps-turns.

Believe me, this will help like no other exercize out there.
You don't really need the rope to start, jumping over a soccer ball would do just fine. Of course, adding the rope is an excellent idea. Good drill! Thanks!
post #21 of 22
Also a good drill for balance, leg strength, agility and coordination is the Tic-Tac-Toe drill.

Get 4 old bamboo slalom poles, or something similar, and lay them on the ground in the shape of a tic-tac-toe board, with the center square approx. 18 inches X 18 inches.

Now, starting from the center square, hop to the top square (12 oclock) then hop back to the center. Then to the corner square (1:30) and back to center. Then to the side (3 oclock) and back. Continue all the way around the tic-tac-toe board, always returning to center every other jump.

Now reverse direction (counter clockwise)

Now do it on one foot. Do it both ways, on each foot.

Now raise the slalom poles off the floor 6-12 inches, and do all the above variations again.

Now narrow the size of the center square.

GIVE IT A TRY. IT'S AN OLDY BUT GOODY
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat
2 questions:
1. What DIN setting should I use when ski training on a trampoline
2. Should I de-tune my edges to avoid tearing the trampoline?
Answers

1. Depends on things like your weight and whether you are an agressive bouncer or not. Best to get them set right though - you don't want a premature release when you are bouncing up and down on the job.
2. Duct tape the ski edges and put a large marshmellow on the end of each ski pole.

I trust this helps

DB
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