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Head Mad Trix Mojo In The East

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Someone told me the other day that people actually ski it in the East.

How many people ski in the East on a 90 waste ski and how horrible are they on the groomed?
post #2 of 17
It's popular in the park. Our local shop always has a few pairs on the wall. I wouldn't want it outside the park though except for a few select wet garbage days maybe. Possibly spring slush.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
I have skied on skis with 70 and 76 all last season and I could barely notice the difference.

I was wondering if there really is a noticeable difference between say 70-80 as opposed to 80-90.

I know some people here say to only go up to 80 in the East or you will start sacrificing edgehold and quickness.

I also know that people who go fat never go back to narrow waisted skis.

I am torn between the Public Enemy and the Mad Trix Mojo for me.

The PE is cheap and alot of people love them. The Mad Trix Mojo is sweet looking and some people also love them.

Chances are I will get the PE but I like to have options.
post #4 of 17
It's all personal taste. Some like to only ski fast, big turns, others like to jam as many as possible. Me, personally, I like a quicker ski no matter what I'm doing (for most conditions). My 1080's are the old school 1080's with a 77 waist. IMO this is as fat as I need/want for around here. I do not like them in the trees because they feel way too slow for my skiing style in comparison to say a 69 waisted ski. I do like them in the park or on heavy garbage days.


They feel and act like GS skis when they get that fat...which I was never a fan of back in the day although many loved them. That said, I may be looking into a newer pair of twins in the future and have to go a bit fatter...I still won't take them into the trees on 95% of the days. I have better/more agile skis for that.
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Does having a binding mounted flat make a ski slower then a ski with a riser plate?

Or do the plates just allow a higher edge angle when carving and not actually allow an earlier turn initiation?
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
Someone told me the other day that people actually ski it in the East.
From what I understand skiing in the East is one of those urban myths which found new life on the Internet.
post #7 of 17
Risers can help you roll the ski over quicker onto it's edge. Is a riser going to help a 90 mm waisted ski suddenly become agile? No.


Risers are typically not used on twins because they lose stability for landing jumps. The higher the rise, the less stabile the ski becomes in the bumps, landings, etc.
post #8 of 17

I have skied Pocket Rockets in the Midwest...

which is arguably even worse than skiing them in the East!

My husband and I both bought Pocket Rockets because we fell in love with them when we demoed them in powder at Snowmass. Of course, we knew they would not be great 95% of the time back home in the Midwest, but we already have skis that work in the East, and we wanted to have our own skis available for when we travel out West. (Plus, now we are trying to move out West, so I'm very happy to have them!)

Surprisingly, to answer your question, they are not too bad on the primarily groomed ice we usually have to ski on. You can't carve as tight a turn and have to adjust to feeling the ski slip a bit and not necessarily grab, but they work, and the Pocket Rocket at least is quite forgiving and handles variations in snow conditions quite well (like sub-standard grooming and chunks of ice/snow). My husband has gotten to the point where he usually skis his PRs regardless of condition. I still switch back to my old Volant Vertexs frequently, although just for a change I will ski the PRs on our Midwest/East junk on occassion.

I don't think I'd want a wider ski like the PR for my primary ski if I was skiing exclusively in the East, though....although my husband might disagree.

Kristine
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
I know twins don't have plates so they are more stable for landings but I assumed it also makes them turn slower.

I think the PEs with a 80 waist will be fine.

If not I can always use my Atomic M XIs.
post #10 of 17
My twins have plates. I have Marker M1200 Pistons on my V-Pros 83mm waist, and 1400 Pistons on my Karmas which are 87mm waist. I also have the T-Plate 120s on my older Bandit XXX with thier 85mm waist. I ski all of them in the East, and they do just fine on the hardpack. I even take the V-Pros in the GS course. They're not perfect, but they do better on the hardpack than my P60s do in the woods!
post #11 of 17
There is some truth to the saying 'Once u go phat, you never go back'. I spent more days on my PR's than any other ski last season (40-50 days). But then I don't live on the east coast
post #12 of 17
I had a two ski quiver. 90 waist Scratch BCs, 74 waisted Bandit XXs.

I skied the Bandits once. I repeat ONCE.

Then again, I live out west, as in San Francisco and ski Tahoe, Utah, Colorado, and once in Europe last season.

So not much help.

But the Scratches are way more fun, even if they aren't specialized for the conditions.
post #13 of 17
The Mojo's are a lot better than the Pocket Rockets on the piste (much more stable). The Mojo's do feel a lot thinner than a 90mm waist ski on the piste.

If it's rock hard boiler plate then the Mojo's are far from the optimum ski to be on. I use a 74mm ski for hard/icy conditions and the Mojo's for everything else.
post #14 of 17
my 2 cents:
you really have to adjust your technique: much more 2 footed, skidded initation, drive mid to end of the turn & push feet out & away. Also keeping the tips pointed down helps, look for an empty trail & avoid the moguls at all cost.
I love my dynastars Little big fats (89 mm waist) , yet only pull em out a couple times a year. Best for off trail/glades at Jay or MRG/SB. Not your prime Ski!
post #15 of 17
Does anybody know if head are offering the Mojos this year and if so is there an updated model for this season?
post #16 of 17
DB -

According to Peter Keelty's site the Mojo is unchanged for this year. It was Head's only 80mm+ ski to get a gold star endorsement from him.
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by iriponsnow
my 2 cents:
you really have to adjust your technique: much more 2 footed, skidded initation, drive mid to end of the turn & push feet out & away. Also keeping the tips pointed down helps, look for an empty trail & avoid the moguls at all cost.
Agree and disagree. You do have to use a different technique with the Mojos, a lot more rotation -- the radius is just too large to carve short turns. But you can get a nice short turns if you work them. But I actually really love the Mojos in the bumps; they are super stable and of course relativly straight, you can pivot very nicely on them. (skiing 180s) Of course, these are western bumps, not eastern bumps; if the backside of each bump was covered with glare ice I might feel diffrently.
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