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when skiing invades the body

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
i have noticed how skiing has increased my balance awareness, for lack of a better phase. i've mentioned this before but now it seems even more deeply ingrained. when i turn corners, change directions, go up and down stairs, etc., it is as if i am still skiing, though at this point i am not consciously thinking about skiing. it is as if the concentration i've applied toward skiing better, especially where the centering of weight is concerned, has taken on its own life and manifests in the most mundane day-to-day activities.
it's even in my eyes, as i look ahead at the line i want to take around a desk, for example, when going around that desk leads to going around another obstacle. they migtht as well be gates, the way i see them. i tend to look for the straightest line; i'm aware how an arm lazily kept to the side (rather than thrown ahead) disrupts the perfect flow of movement.

that i'm a little "off" is a given by now. still, i'm curious; has anyone else experienced this?
post #2 of 28
Yup, especially the linking of turns around obstacles in the lab in which I work. Also, the hightened consciousness of balance, mainly from the core muscles, in most actions.
post #3 of 28
I look down a flight of stairs, and think "yeah I can ski that"
post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 
a bump run, of course.
post #5 of 28
Quote:
posted by ryan:
it's even in my eyes, as i look ahead at the line i want to take around a desk, for example, when going around that desk leads to going around another obstacle.
Yer losin it bud.

I know what you mean. I pass hills and I actually say to Jeff....."I'd ski that". Then we debate whether or not I could.

The scariest moment for me came after day 3 of ESA1. We stopped at the Silver Fork after the days outstanding instruction, and in the rental car on the way down the mountain (apres) apres ski, I couldn't remember how to drive! I had to make an immediate left out of my parking space, and I found my feet doing that edge thang and the hands weren't turning the wheel!

Needless to say, the car went straight, I jammed on the brakes and started laughing, and oboe and Susieski thought I was insane.

They were right.
post #6 of 28
We used to run through the high school turning posts into slalom poles and prejumping steps. People kept saying we needed to grow up. Boy were they wrong. In some areas you don't ever need to grow up. I still turn things into slalom poles when I'm walking.
post #7 of 28
To Rio: are you doing lots of "olah" (you know, when the slalom skier was skiing directly against the pole, almost skiing in a traighline)?
To ryan: this bit [qb]i tend to look for the straightest line[/qb] is not necessarily leading to the fastes line, right?
Anyway, ryan, simply I don't know, I've been skiing since I was 6 y.o. so skiing has always been part of my life, I can't really thell if the "balance awareness" seeped into my everyday life from skiing and when.
Having practiced judo and now taij quan, otoh, later in life, I can tell you what those two disciplines have added to my everyday life...but I think that it is OT here.
post #8 of 28
Not quite on topic, but when driving (especially through WV) I look at the mountains and think that wherever I'm looking would be a sweet ski run...
post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 
Parking meters are gates.
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
Parking meters are gates.
For DH, SG and GS like, not for SL like deplacements....
post #11 of 28
I've been taking a Grad level Math course for the past few weeks. It's funny how in my mind, if only in my mind, all of the problems were somehow related to math.
post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 
"...not for SL like deplacements..."

boy did i learn that quick.
post #13 of 28
I have the slalom problem just walking around corners. Its like I'm clipping a slalom gate, except theres no give, the worst thing is its completely unconscious (and yes I have fallen on my ass too).

I also look at mountains, and hills and wonder what they'd be like to ski, as I drive down the road, but I also, see changes in terrain and wonder what it would be like to hit that full speed, or getting towed in with a snowmobile.
post #14 of 28
You bicycle riders will recognize this one: My house is on the side of a pretty big hill. Sometimes at the beginning or end of a ride I like to start at the top with my bike and do a series of big linked turns all the way down the street. My son agrees with me that the rhythm and G forces feel a lot like skiing. The neighbors think we're losing it with all the wild looking swerves.
post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 
Sometimes my shoulder will clip a wall as I round the corner. (I think, "I just lost the race right there.") It's been witnessed a couple times.

"Ryan, you alright?"

"Yeah. Clipped a gate."
post #16 of 28
Try living close to a ski area if you want max depression.

Grass that's 3 feet tall on all the runs, so you can't even walk the hill. Lifts with no lines, or chairs. The chairs stacked in piles next to the maintenance shed. Piston Bully's with the tracks off, all the HKD's with the nozzels next to the ground. The one lift that is running is hauling Deval Karts up the hill. People in tank tops and zories riding the lift. The area dog, a Husky, is nowhere to be found.

All you can do is stand at the bottom of your favorite run and look up the hill and think back onto what it was and imagine what it will be again.

Bummer! Think Snow.
post #17 of 28
For years I've been afraid I was the only one doing these things! I run "gates" at work in the office, doing yardwork, etc. - not literally run, but unconsciously taking the optimal line close to objects I am passing. I continually scrape myself on bushes, etc.

I also think about skiing any slope I pass with any space between the trees, especially if they are steep and have untracked snow.
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 
"Try living close to a ski area if you want max depression."

Tell me you are NOT bemoaning your horrible fate.
post #19 of 28
Doesn't everyone take the inside line on a curvy back road?
post #20 of 28
hanging tree branches on trails make great slalom gates.
post #21 of 28
the occasional hockey stop and flicking wrists for pole plants have gotten me weird looks.

"WHaaaat? I'm skiing in my Hed!
post #22 of 28
Quote:
posted by gotamagal:
Doesn't everyone take the inside line on a curvy back road?
I've raced a stockcar once. Now I pick my "line" while driving the beautifully twisted roads of Vermont! What a thrill, especially when there is oncoming traffic!:
post #23 of 28
Visiting a ski area in the summer, does it seem to you too that the expert slopes look way steeper? Especially when you can see the stumps and rocks you skied over.
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mapnut
Visiting a ski area in the summer, does it seem to you too that the expert slopes look way steeper? Especially when you can see the stumps and rocks you skied over.
Actually, in some cases, just the opposite seems to happen. Where I ski most often there is one very steep but quite short pitch that grows huge, aweful, misshappen whales of bumps and is especially nasty to ski at times.

I walked that in the fall one year expecting some serious pitch and unusual terrain features---like buried VW's or something to explain the nasty bumps.

It was steep, not as steep as I expected, but smooth as a pool table.

To me, looking UP makes them seem steeper than they really are and looking DOWN does just the opposite.
post #25 of 28
Ahh, the true issue here is that we all look at everything as a gate, a mogul, a cool shoot, a great place to jump off- We are all obsessed! I look at every slope, hill and trail and try to pick the best line to ski it!
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
there's a stretch of hill i walk up in the morning and then down when i walk home. it is when i am going home that i imagine myself doing easy, slow-as-possible pivot slip exercises down this hill.
funny how the "if skis were underfoot" sense is never that far away.
post #27 of 28
The guy in Seinfeld that didn't swing his arms when walking was a skier.
post #28 of 28
My drive home from the ski hill is along a lonely highway where often mine is the only car for miles and miles. I have caught myself doing slalom while reminiscing about the day's turns. That's kind of scary, actually.
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