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Starbucks at Snowshoe

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
To preface this message, I don't disklike Starbucks too much (over priced overroasted coffee but the gingerbread latte is tasty), but the appearance of a Starbucks in the village at Snowshoe just didn't sit all too well with me for some reason. I'll admit that Snowshoe is more concerned with getting money from lodging than anything else and that the scene is more focused on eating (good food) and DRINKING than skiing, but the Starbucks replaced an awesome coffee shop there. Maybe I shouldn't complain since I can always go to more skiing-oriented areas (i.e. Timberline) for less money anyways.
post #2 of 24
It must be more than the over-priced coffee, etc., that makes Starbucks such a lightning rod, especially within the context of "expansion." I wonder what it represents to so many people. (Since tone of voice is hard to detect here, let me make clear I'm not attacking your post at all; I'm simply interested in Starbucks because, like IKEAs, so many claim to not like them much yet they're always jam-packed.)

I think their color scheme is brilliant, by the way, where colors and brand recognition meet marketing. (Also, as an aside, I remember standing on a street corner in San Francisco a few years ago and within eyesight were three Starbucks.)

I was with a Colorado skier who shall remain nameless (Pinhed) who, after we'd skied Beaver Creek and were ready to hop on 70 for the drive back, asked if anyone in the car needed a Starbucks stop. I still don't know if he was baiting a Californian (as he claimed to be) (I guess Angelenos have a Starbucks rep?) or if my "no thanks" kept him from that latte' he was actually dying for.
post #3 of 24
Starbucks is not the greatest coffee out there. The problem is most of the coffee shops outside the major cities are way worse. I have had some incredibly bad coffees in small towns near ski areas. Asking the locals doesn't help since many of them like the oversweetened swill being served locally. If I'm on the road and need a jolt of caffiene I'll look for a Starbucks.
post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 
Starbucks is consistent, which most people like, and has a good image for people who dig that thing. I'm upset in part since the coffee shop they replaced was damn good, but never busy. The Starbucks I spoke of had a line coming out of the door, so business-wise it deserved to be there. Not to be an anti-capitalist whiner, but do we want lodges and villages looking like strip malls? I usually go to Nub's Nob in MI every winter since I have family with a place there, and non-skiiers go to their lodge for the food, particularly the soup and chili. I guess if a resort doesn't try at all and just serves up overpriced crap, then screw them then. On the other hand, resorts that have unique and good food/drinks (i.e. Foxfire BBQ at Snowshoe) are better for it. Just as each resort is unique for the mountain itself, lodges/villages should and can be unique for good food. If anything, rent out space to local vendors who would stand to make a killing rather than keeping a stranglehold of on-slope lunch options.
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
(Also, as an aside, I remember standing on a street corner in San Francisco a few years ago and within eyesight were three Starbucks.)
Go to Vancouver. Any street coner there has five within eyesight!!!!

: : :
post #6 of 24
I dig Vancouver anyway.
(And prefer Peet's, when I'm in a conspicuous coffee consumption mode.)
post #7 of 24
Vancouver, USA or Vancouver, BC?
post #8 of 24
Vancouver, Miss'ssip'.

There're others?
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
I was with a Colorado skier who shall remain nameless (Pinhed) who, after we'd skied Beaver Creek and were ready to hop on 70 for the drive back, asked if anyone in the car needed a Starbucks stop. I still don't know if he was baiting a Californian (as he claimed to be) (I guess Angelenos have a Starbucks rep?) or if my "no thanks" kept him from that latte' he was actually dying for.
Dying... for... vanilla... latte. Extra hot please!

I wouldn't bait you, Ryan.

Funnier yet, I'm the Intrawest business analyst who is leading the deploy of 5 Starbucks coffee shops each season in various location across the country. There are 6 so far. I was just in Squaw last week getting their new POS server up and running.

Okay, I better run and hide now.:
post #10 of 24
something about the juxtaposition of deploy and Starbucks, while disturbing, explains so much.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
Vancouver, Miss'ssip'.

There're others?
There's one in Washington but its of little interest since they've closed the Lucky brewery.
post #12 of 24
further proof that just because you're Lucky don't mean it'll all be good.
post #13 of 24
There was an ominous article along those lines in The Onion a few years ago. They've taken down full text of old articles from their online archive (except for paying customers), but here's how it started:

"Starbucks To Begin Sinister 'Phase Two' Of Operation
SEATTLE–After a decade of aggressive expansion throughout North America and abroad, Starbucks suddenly and unexpectedly closed its 2,870 worldwide locations Monday to prepare for what company...
3709 | 14 March 2001 | News "

Another clip:

"This week, they canceled their usual 500,000-count order of Java Jackets and ordered 12 million Starbucks-insignia arm bands. They also called off their standing order for restaurant-grade first-aid kits, saying they had a heavy-duty source for those now. Starbucks employees earmarked for retraining are being taught revised corporate procedures alongside 15,500 new hires recently recruited from such non-traditional sources as the CIA retirement program, Internet bulletin boards frequented by former Eagle Scouts, and the employment section in the back of Soldier of Fortune magazine."

--ts01

(Happily hooked to 3 daily doses of SBUX, thank you very much.)
post #14 of 24
We now have 3 Starbucks in Mammoth Lakes (pop 7,000).
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
something about the juxtaposition of deploy and Starbucks, while disturbing, explains so much.
de·ploy ( P ) Pronunciation Key (d-ploi)
v. de·ployed, de·ploy·ing, de·ploys
v. tr.
    1. To position (troops) in readiness for combat, as along a front or line. To bring (forces or material) into action.
    2. To base (a weapons system) in the field.
  1. To distribute (persons or forces) systematically or strategically.
  2. To put into use or action: “Samuel Beckett's friends suspected that he was a genius, yet no one knew... how his abilities would be deployed” (Richard Ellmann).

Ready
Aim
"Someone get me a latte please"
FIRE!
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinHed
de·ploy [list=1]
  1. To position (troops) in readiness for combat, as along a front or line. To bring (forces or material) into action.
Hm, maybe you should change your job title from Business Analyst to Lieutenant.
post #17 of 24
post #18 of 24
IMO, The old shop at SS was practicaly starbucks with a diff name. They even used a starbucks lookalike logo. I couldn't care less, now I will know exactly what to order.
post #19 of 24
The T-Mobile WIFI access at this location is a plus, whether you like Starbucks or not. Keeps more people off the slope.
post #20 of 24
SBUX= Corporate Coffee

Support local business's, buy from the folks who live and have a real stake in the community.
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron
SBUX= Corporate Coffee

Support local business's, buy from the folks who live and have a real stake in the community.
Ron, we'd all love to support the local under dog. But home-grown loyalty goes out the window when one buys a lift ticket from the same corporation that brews the Starbucks coffee ...it's an Intrawest licensed Starbucks.

Not that it really matters.
post #22 of 24
I didn't even notice the StarBucks when I was there last season. Of course to tell ya the truth my main objective was skiing...I only stopped to eat in the cafeteria. I did not bother to walk around the village. I like the starbucks frappucino, but on a cold day I like hot chocolate. I am not much of a coffee person. It is a shame that they took out the other coffee place if it was good. As you guys have said it is all about making money...
post #23 of 24
Beleive it or not, they actually closed the Starbucks on the main drag area of my former college's campus - North Carolina State, siting that with the renovations to the street, the rent had become to high. This now means that students will have to walk an extra 2 minutes to get to the starbucks just down the street
post #24 of 24
Oh no students getting exercise! How awful! Ha,ha No StarBucks on my campus, but a lot of walking.
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