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snowboarders vs skiers get it on in the bumps - Page 2

post #31 of 34
Thread Starter 

no fun

experience will make them no fun. that's when you ride them switch
post #32 of 34
So taking a 172cm snowboard (most likely more designed for big mountain riding) is not fun in the bumps, thats similar to saying 212+cm downhill skis suck in the bumps, yes, equiptment, and choice of equiptment, can and is a limiting factor, but you chose that equiptment for riding your preference in terrain, not necessarily for all-mountain riding/cruising and from the sounds of it, not for learning new things.

I have skis that are 90mm+ in the waist (quiet wide wasited for skis), and I can honestly say they scared me when I tried to ski the bumps with them, however, they are more design specific skis (designed for big mountain and park and pipe), not all mountain, does that mean I can't or shouldn't ski bumps, no it means my equiptment is a limitation, while it would be possible to ski bumps on them, my all mountain skis are better suited for bumps.

In terms of the fun factor, I hated, no, HATED bumps for years, and would avoid them at all costs, they weren't fun, they hurt my knees and lower back, and I never felt like I was in control. However I did not let that be a deterant for me, I wanted and desired to be able to ski the whole mountian comfortably, and bumps were always my limitation and anything but fun. However, once I realized how to ski them they became fun.

Trees are great practice for the bumps, often times trees are seen as an obstacle to turn around, much like bumps, but when you learn to look at the light spots (openings in the trees) and not the trees themselves you can start to utilize the trees to help establish a rhythm, much like the bumps. Furthermore, when you get into really tight trees, you need very quick reactions, and a totally different blend of your skills base than what you use on groomers, that ability to adapt your skills base is the same in bumps. Often times people have the skills needed to ski/board bumps, but don't realize it, which makes me say it is not typically the skills (rotary movements, balancing, edging, pressure control and being able to blend the 4 main skills) that need to change, but the mindset and approach.
post #33 of 34

hitting a bump with a snowboard ....

hitting a bump, front foot goes to the top of da bump, then the middle of the board between both feet is at the top - quite uncomfortable, then at last the rear foot passes the bump : it is quite difficult this way to topple over the board from the uphill side of the bump to its downhill side.

While with skis, as the feet are at the same level in the fall line, same dynamic is much easier and quicker to be realized.

That's why usually boarders in a bumps field most often turn around bumps, much more than hitting them as a mogul skier would do, searching for the faster way through the field.

Don't you think so ?
post #34 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackdaw
hitting a bump, front foot goes to the top of da bump, then the middle of the board between both feet is at the top - quite uncomfortable, then at last the rear foot passes the bump : it is quite difficult this way to topple over the board from the uphill side of the bump to its downhill side.

While with skis, as the feet are at the same level in the fall line, same dynamic is much easier and quicker to be realized.

That's why usually boarders in a bumps field most often turn around bumps, much more than hitting them as a mogul skier would do, searching for the faster way through the field.
You're right, however, zipper lining a bump field on skis is not really that comfortable for most people either. Fluidity is key in bumps. When you see someone on the edge of control zipper lining the bumps, and another who is skiing/boarding at a constant speed, smoothly, never out of control, who do you think is doing a better job? Speed in bumps does not necessarily mean skilled. To me fluidity in bumps equates skill. By having both feet able to pressure a board, in theory, could provide a better opportunity to absorb the minor inconsistencies, not necessarily absorb the whole bump (the way bump skiers/racers do when zip-lining). It was just a thought, not anything I can say is or ever has been proven.
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