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Whistler expansion

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I just got an e-mail from Whistler that they are adding 1100 acres of terrain to Whistler mt. It includes terrain going from the peak to Creekside. I know where those runs are. However, it also includes "Flute Bowl" which they bill as a backcountry experience, similar I imagine to Blue Sky Basin at Vail. Does anybody know where Flute Bowl is?
post #2 of 19
Go part way down Burnt Stew trail then along the ridge above Symphony Bowl passed Piccolo Peak.
post #3 of 19
Hey wait a minute... that's no "expansion", all they're doing is taking down some of the boundary ropes to let people ski where they used to anyway! I thought it was odd the email didn't say anything about lift development.
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Doesn't Flute bowl require a lift. Or is there a way out of there that doesn't require going uphill.
post #5 of 19
I do remember reading somewhere that you "need to hike in and hike out" of Flute Bowl
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Apparently 400 of the acres are additional runs to Creekside. The other 700 are not lift served, but require significant hiking. I have heard that they may put a lift down in the flute bowl area eventually
post #7 of 19

you guys need help.

if whistler isnt enough mountain 4 you guys as is, you really need to stop and smell the boarders you've been mowing down trying to get to dusty's before the lunch rush.
post #8 of 19
...if Whistler isn't enough mountain for you guys, come to Europe...
post #9 of 19
Hey, Whistler is more than enough... unfortunately, getting to be way more than enough. Though I can be at Whistler from home before most people can be at the airport, it is prohibitively expensive now for everyone but rich tourists. Luckily there are lots of skiing options near Vancouver... I got a season's pass for my family of four at another area for the cost of about 8 single Whistler day tickets. We now save Whistler for a treat a few times a year. Frankly, nearby hills have been getting twice the pow the past few years anyhow.
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR
Hey, Whistler is more than enough... unfortunately, getting to be way more than enough. Though I can be at Whistler from home before most people can be at the airport, it is prohibitively expensive now for everyone but rich tourists. Luckily there are lots of skiing options near Vancouver... I got a season's pass for my family of four at another area for the cost of about 8 single Whistler day tickets. We now save Whistler for a treat a few times a year. Frankly, nearby hills have been getting twice the pow the past few years anyhow.
My sister lives in vancouver and i'll be visiting there a fair bit next year, where do you think are the best places to ski other than whistler? (whistler will be a once a year thing for me...too expensive)
post #11 of 19
Other than Whistler, I'd suggest you ski Blackcomb.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat
Other than Whistler, I'd suggest you ski Blackcomb.
Ladies and gentlemen...give it up for that great comic, Mr. Fox.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat
Other than Whistler, I'd suggest you ski Blackcomb.
LOL
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gurpy
My sister lives in vancouver and i'll be visiting there a fair bit next year, where do you think are the best places to ski other than whistler? (whistler will be a once a year thing for me...too expensive)
I'd rate 'em like this:

Grouse Mountain: 15 minutes from downtown Vancouver by car, or about 1/2hr by city bus. Some decent terrain, if short runs (about 1200 vertft). Awesome night skiing, and just plain fun. About 4 or 5 lifts, including 1 hi-sp quad. Night skiing give the best view of the city from anywhere.

Cypress Bowl: about 30 minutes from downtown by car. About 1500 vertft, 4 or 5 lifts including 1 hi-spd quad. Longer runs than Grouse, terrain just fine for everyone.

Mt. Seymour: Again, 4 or 5 lifts. Short runs. Some okay little steeps, but lots of flats. About 1/2hr from downtown by car.

Hemlock Valley: About 2 hrs from Vancouver by car, in the Fraser Valley. Cheap, and well worth it (plan substantial time for chair stoppages). People here still use straight 210's and wear 1 piece dayglo's, but they can ski better than you can. The road is scary, and when they say chains are mandatory, they ain't kidding. About 1300 vert, open Thurs-Sun. 3 chairs, and some challenging terrain.

Mt. Baker: About 2 1/2hrs from Vancouver. This hill is actually in Washington State to the South, so be prepared to deal with US Customs agents. This hill rocks! Double or triple the snowfall of Whistler, and plenty of challenging terrain. About 1600 vertft, 7 or 8 chairs. A bit more expensive, but you get a better deal if you pay in Canadian cash.

Manning Park: About 3 hrs from Vancouver. The snow's a bit lighter, as getting away from the ocean influence. 2 chairs, the tallest about 1200 vert ft. Good value.

All these places (with the exception of Manning) have heavier, but more plentiful snow than Whistler, and lift tickets will be about 1/2 the cost. There are no on-hill accomodations, for all practical purposes. In the 4-6hr-from-Vancouver category are some superb resorts: Sun Peaks, Big White, Silver Star, Apex. A full day's drive will get you to Panorama, Red, Kicking Horse, blah, blah, blah....

However, if you can afford Whistler, it's definately the best bang for your buck.
post #15 of 19
I think I should move to Vancouver.

Do they have a good financial industry?
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR
I'd rate 'em like this:

Grouse Mountain: 15 minutes from downtown Vancouver by car, or about 1/2hr by city bus. Some decent terrain, if short runs (about 1200 vertft). Awesome night skiing, and just plain fun. About 4 or 5 lifts, including 1 hi-sp quad. Night skiing give the best view of the city from anywhere.

Cypress Bowl: about 30 minutes from downtown by car. About 1500 vertft, 4 or 5 lifts including 1 hi-spd quad. Longer runs than Grouse, terrain just fine for everyone.

Mt. Seymour: Again, 4 or 5 lifts. Short runs. Some okay little steeps, but lots of flats. About 1/2hr from downtown by car.

Hemlock Valley: About 2 hrs from Vancouver by car, in the Fraser Valley. Cheap, and well worth it (plan substantial time for chair stoppages). People here still use straight 210's and wear 1 piece dayglo's, but they can ski better than you can. The road is scary, and when they say chains are mandatory, they ain't kidding. About 1300 vert, open Thurs-Sun. 3 chairs, and some challenging terrain.

Mt. Baker: About 2 1/2hrs from Vancouver. This hill is actually in Washington State to the South, so be prepared to deal with US Customs agents. This hill rocks! Double or triple the snowfall of Whistler, and plenty of challenging terrain. About 1600 vertft, 7 or 8 chairs. A bit more expensive, but you get a better deal if you pay in Canadian cash.

Manning Park: About 3 hrs from Vancouver. The snow's a bit lighter, as getting away from the ocean influence. 2 chairs, the tallest about 1200 vert ft. Good value.

All these places (with the exception of Manning) have heavier, but more plentiful snow than Whistler, and lift tickets will be about 1/2 the cost. There are no on-hill accomodations, for all practical purposes. In the 4-6hr-from-Vancouver category are some superb resorts: Sun Peaks, Big White, Silver Star, Apex. A full day's drive will get you to Panorama, Red, Kicking Horse, blah, blah, blah....

However, if you can afford Whistler, it's definately the best bang for your buck.
Great! Thanks for your reply, it was a big help.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Do they have a good financial industry?
Well, I don't know about that one but I sure see some really thrifty people living in town
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moose21
I think I should move to Vancouver.

Do they have a good financial industry?
If you want to work for boiler rooms promoting stock scams then Vancouver is the place for you
post #19 of 19
Whistler is expensive, but if you know how to work all the different deals, it can be relatively affordable (ie. 2for1 passes, express card, corp tickets, etc...) I've skied other areas in BC and though they can be great, the driving to get there can be challenging esp in the middle of winter. What I've concluded is that for me, there's no place like home (which is Whistler). There's so much terrain (marked) and so much hidden terrain that you'll never get bored.
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