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Best of Whistler/Blackcomb??

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Hi guys..... well I've been selling my Whistler package for a couple of months, and I just had to expand. I've got 25 people signed up, with room for 32. Gonna be there in March.

Here's my questions....... I need good stuff for the group. Where's the best rentals, favorite inexpensive restaurants, best bars, favorite instructors, etc...

I guess I'm looking for a Best of Whistler kind of list. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #2 of 28
post #3 of 28
Best instructors

Roger Systad
Michel Berthoud
Kevin (surname unknown from demo team - used to have locker next to Roger)

[img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #4 of 28
Informed sources tell me the Best of Whistler/Blackcomb was about 1977.
post #5 of 28
There aren't many restaurants in the village that aren't mega $$$ that can cater to that kind of size. : I would try Blacks, they were pretrty reasonable. Oh, and definately try to get a booking for the buffet at the Delta on XMas eve - had it last year. Stunning.
post #6 of 28
The only cheap food I found in Whistler was at Quiznos.
post #7 of 28
I highly recommend Forks in the village, but not for a group that size : [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #8 of 28
I wish I could remember the names of some of the places, but they were all good to me. And to spite what those have posted above, everything in the village is cheap if you take into account the US exchange rate. My wife and I stayed there for 6-days, skied, and ate all meals and drinks in the village and spent about $950.
post #9 of 28
Call Whistler's guest relations line (number available from their website), and they will be most helpful. If you tell them the size of your group and a few details about what you are looking for, they will see you get exactly what you need. Whistler is classy that way, they actually do aim to please rather than just do what they can to fill up their hotels and restaurants. There is very little that will disappoint in Whistler, and having been going there for 20 years, I cannot recall a single bad tourism experience. There are simply good establishments, and better. You get what you pay for, and though it is expensive by Cdn standards, still a bargain for our American friends.

Really, your best bet is to start at http://www.whistlerblackcomb.com/ , browse the site and links, and give them a call!
post #10 of 28
If you have good skiers (NOT good EASTERN skiers) Extremely Canadian is great. You learn the mountains really well and get great instruction. I have worked with Steve M and Kristy A.

Ski Esprit is also a good lesson package. Chris C and Denis B were good instructors for me.

Boston Pizza delivers and they have reasonably priced good food. I alway have the Ribs. Zeuski's is reasnably priced Greek. The Keg is also not outrageous.
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally posted by worldfishnski:
If you have good skiers (NOT good EASTERN skiers) Extremely Canadian is great.
What kind of an ignorant statement is that?

Yeah all us Eastern skiers ski on baby hills and ice and sideslip down the mountain.

I wish I could find that Ski or Skiing article where they took some pros back to the East (they grew up skiing there) after being out West for a few years and they were having a fun time skiing on our baby hills.
post #12 of 28
As for Extremely Canadian, take few runs with FeliX L. He managed to get our heart rates up a bit with some straightlines and small drops. They're a great group and will really show you around the mountain.

Fav bar - Moe Joes (under tapleys)
Fav Apres Ski - for me its Dustys, but only because my place is at Creekside, for most its the Longhorn at Whistler Base. I'm also a bit partial to GLC and Black's and Duhblin Gate and ....

Fav Nite out - Moe Joes, Tommy Africa's (gogo girls!!)

Fav restaurant - Depends on who's paying and what you're looking for, but Sushi Village is an original Whistler hangout. Crowded, but fun with a group. Rimrock for seafood, Uli's Flipside for huge portions at a reasonable (for Whistler) price. There are quite few coffee/sandwich type places hidden around where you can get a cheap meal (Ingrids, Behind the Grind, MOoguls etc)

----------------------------------------------------------------
Fav thing to do --- SKI! Everything else is secondary.

Fav ski things

- Peak to Creek - down the Dave Murray Downhill pretending to be Rob Boyd, and maybe being passed by him.

- First Gondola up in the morning on a powder day, or any day for that matter.

- Meeting friends at Peak chair.

Too many more to mention.
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally posted by worldfishnski:
If you have good skiers (NOT good EASTERN skiers) Extremely Canadian is great...
Interesting statement. : Care to explain what you're talking about?
post #14 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the input guys. I'm just ignoring the ignorant comment. I've been skiing for 25 years, with 98% of being in the east. Hence the nick. Let's not turn this into a flame war. The reason I like this BB so much is because it so rarely turns into trash, and there are so many intelligent passionate real skiers on it. Keep it up guys..... [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #15 of 28
I had a great dining experience at Dubh Linn Gate....so good that we actually ate there twice. They are right in front of the Blackcomb Gondola. Nice Irish pub with great food (great Nachos!) and some live entertainment.
post #16 of 28
ESB,
As someone noted, guest relations will bend over backward to give you all the info you need.

I've taken 2 groups to France (Les Trois Vallees & Cham) & my 2cents if I was taking a group to W/b (been there 3/4 tmes):

1) Make sure your group knows about First tracks. Buy the ticket the night ebfore with s premium surcharge & you get the first gon up. Soon as they hit the green you'r off. Also includes great breakfast.

2) Thai One On may be able to seat your mob is 2/ 3 groups. Good moderate food. Also Keg & Sushi Village are consistent.

3) As someone else said....do Peak to Creek. If you're leading the pack, I'd sugest this run just before lunch as it will cull the herd of those with shaky quads.

4) Check out the Horstman Hut. It's on the map.

5) Best bootfitter (if he's still goin') Ernie at wild Willie's at Nestors Sqare.

6) As at any major dest: suggest lunches a bit early or a bit late.

7)Inquire about the Mtn Host program. It's basically a free tour given by volunteers but the "hosts I had one time" Included a young gal from the Canadian team who was darn hard to keep up with (she had a geat ahtletic group and we had a great time with her). You meet at certain times & points. This way your clients don't waste time standing around loooking at trail maps.

What time of yr are you going & from where?

TreepickerSue
post #17 of 28
Visit Chef Bernards (at Glacier Lodge) for breakfast, brunch or lunch. Very high quality and delicious food. The cafe seats only 15-20 folks, however. Bernard used to be the head chef at the Fairmont Whistler, and this is his initial effort to have his own place. I had a wonderful grilled wild salmon sandwhich at Chef Bernards last April, with a homemade pesto sause as a topping. Yummie!

I second the nomination, too, of Dubh Lin Gate for great pub food and for an impressive variety of beers on tap.
post #18 of 28
Would agree with all of the above (the helpful bits anyway)
All the instructors I've had there have been very good (I think Michel Bertoud was mentioned earlier - he taught my girlfiend so I'd second that recommendation!) - I'd also hihgly recommend one of the instructors I had last year called Margie Shaw, took us to loads of hidden gems and was a great laugh.
Ski Esprit is good, especially at the weekend as you get to bypass the queues (which can be long (by US/Canadian standards at least) at the weekend), you get to cover a lot of terain and it is very social.
If you've got a bit more money to burn (but not quite enough to justify a private lesson), doing a "supergroup" lesson is well worth it as the max group size is 3 so you get lots of individual attention to your technique and cover a lot of ground.

Always too knackered for any serious apres (with all the skiing combined with the jetlag) but Di Umbertos Tratoria is worth a visit if only to have dinner at the bar (it was very busy when we turned up without a reservation) to watch the chef(s) in action.
Also Dublin Gate (good food, atmosphere and live music), GLC, the brewhouse, the place underneath the delta whistler suites/village (forgotten the name!) does good cocktails, the brewhouse for the in house brewed beers - also you can get big groups in here so this might be good.
In fact you can't really go wrong anywhere - that's why we'll be back for the third year running next feb/march

For us (not having any serious hockey over here), one of the highlights was going to Vancouver to watch the Cannucks Vs Colorado Avalanches, Vancouver got the winner in overtime (sorry any Colorado fans!) and the place went wild!! [img]smile.gif[/img]

Stuart
post #19 of 28
following on from the above - has anyone done the Atomic Dave Murray camp as I was thinking of doing that this season.

Stuart
post #20 of 28
I did the Dave Murray course last year and it was excellent, it reads as if it is a racing type course but when I did it they concentrated more on all mountain technique and it was really good, but you had to leave your ego at the base of the mountain. We had a French instructor who has worked with a number of the downhill national teams and he was an hard taskmaster and forthright in his comments,however good you might have thought you were he brought you back to earth, but the whole group learned a great deal on the course. We might have been slightly out of the ordinary since when I did it there was a big race on which was continually delayed- too much snow apparently-so access to the race areas was limited and then there was too much fresh snow the day we were going to do it. Good apres ski get togethers as well. I would certainly recommend it and am planning to do it again if I go back this year.
post #21 of 28
I can also vouch for Michel Berthoud, who took my Ski Esprit group and was v good.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally posted by stuarth:

All the instructors I've had there have been very good (I think Michel Bertoud was mentioned earlier - he taught my girlfiend so I'd second that recommendation!) - I'd also hihgly recommend one of the instructors I had last year called Margie Shaw, took us to loads of hidden gems and was a great laugh.
Meesh & Margie are getting married!
post #23 of 28
I'd second the recommendation for Dave Murray SKi camp. Great coaches who don't pull any punches when critiquing technique. You should be able to get a lot of mileage with them, along with a bit of gate training. If it snows they usually forget the gates and head up high to make some tracks. There's also the free Atomic loaners, an opportunity to try most of them.

They do tailor it to the group level though, not as critical with a lower level group. If they think you are sking under your ability, or have picked bad habits they'll be all over you. I've done it with Dave Traynor a few times and I'd recommend him.
post #24 of 28
Favourite on-mountain snack:
Crystal Hut (at the top of the Crystal chair on Blackcomb) ... superb waffles. Don't be put off by the odor from the toilets as you approach (seperate building) ... the waffles are made to order & will fill you up for sure.

Favourite late start:
Chef Bernards: excellent breakfast, but be prepared to wait as it's small so not many seats.

Favourite if someone else is paying:
Rimrock: top notch posh food [img]smile.gif[/img] Spent $70 (CDN) per head for 3 courses inc. wine ... which is cheap by UK standards for a very very nice place.

Somebody commented about Whistler being expensive to eat out & by Aussie or US standards it probably is, but for a Scot living near London who usually skis in France it is dirt cheap.

Favourite apres ski snack:
Merlins (next to Blackcomb lodge) has the biggest plate of natchos I've ever seen. Good burgers too.

Favourite stagger from home:
Gators (above the Boot near Nesters): good Mexican food, can watch the hockey game if you're at the bar ... and then there's the Boot downstairs with the Boot Ballet on a Tuesday evening (the local striptease).

My favourite ski shop: Wild Willies at Nesters.

Favourite tree run: Arthurs Choice (or Arthurs Crack as I renamed it) ... off Ridge Runner ... far left of Blackcomb as you look at the trail map.

Favourite callestrole intake: a Ridgerunner breakfast roll from Rendezvour (sorry, my spelling is hopeless).

Favourite powder stash: not telling

Favourite bumps: Staircase (Blackcomb, between the 2 chairs heading out of Glacier Creek).

Favourite nightspot: Tommy Africas after a serious 'Guitar Doug' Monday night session at Merlins.

Favourite hangover cure: bumps off the front of Peak Chair when visibility is poor and the going is heavy. A close 2nd would be 15 mins in the Walzers at the fair :
post #25 of 28
Re: instruction, Extremely Canadian is fantastic. They really give you a great tour of the mountains and the insruction I received was excellent (Wendy Brookbank). I only skied with Felix for a few runs but he's a super guy. It was probably the most fun I've ever had in an instructional setting. If all you want is a guide for two days they do that too.

Apres Ski, just about anywhere at the base of Whistler is fine. I have to second the thumbs up on the nachos at Merlins at the base of Blackcomb. A good place for dinner was Al's? (can't remember) Bistro, very close to The Keg, good food and the prices were relatively reasonable.

As far as the mountains themselves, regardless of ability, everyone should take a ride up the Peak Chair on a clear day. The views are unforgettable. Oh, and the skiing's not bad either. Anyone that is a solid intermediate level or better must make at least one trip back to Blackcomb Glacier. There's a long run out, over 3 miles, but definitely worth it. For the experts in the group make the short hike over Spanky's Ladder, but go with someone who knows the terrain there. There is some real exposure if you make a mistake in the wrong place.

If the weather is decent you WILL have a blast!
post #26 of 28
Food - Splitz, you will see what burgers were meant to be.

[img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally posted by skieast:
I'd second the recommendation for Dave Murray SKi camp. Great coaches who don't pull any punches when critiquing technique. You should be able to get a lot of mileage with them, along with a bit of gate training. If it snows they usually forget the gates and head up high to make some tracks. There's also the free Atomic loaners, an opportunity to try most of them.

They do tailor it to the group level though, not as critical with a lower level group. If they think you are sking under your ability, or have picked bad habits they'll be all over you. I've done it with Dave Traynor a few times and I'd recommend him.
Third the DAve Murray Camp. I was in a huge rut and they got me out of it and made me ski better and I am a stubborn unteachable SOB - or so I thought
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally posted by EasternSkiBum:
Hi guys..... well I've been selling my Whistler package for a couple of months, and I just had to expand. I've got 25 people signed up, with room for 32. Gonna be there in March.

Here's my questions....... I need good stuff for the group. Where's the best rentals, favorite inexpensive restaurants, best bars, favorite instructors, etc...

I guess I'm looking for a Best of Whistler kind of list. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
Wild Willies and Snowcovers are good shops with superior customer service.

From cheaper to more expensive for food - Old Spaghetti Factory; Boston Pizza - Splitz - DubhLinn Gate - Sushi Village - Ullis - RimRock. Also like the pasta allucan scarf at the family restaurant at the Chateau whose name I can never recall.

Instructors- Peter Weiland; Willy Raine; John Buchanan. Willy and Buchy are also DM ski instructors.

Do a heli drop in Rainbow glacier if you have the time. Its not super expensive.
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