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You are my Sunshine!

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Is it possible to fall in love with a ski resort? Maybe! This has got to be my all time favorite place. Nice wide blue cruisers, beautiful scenery, a gondola system that Whistler should try to copy, you gotta LOVE this place! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #2 of 24
Yes it is. When I talk with family or friends, they ask me how I am getting along with Alta lately. They wounder how she has been, what she has been puting me through, and has she been rewarding me lately. When I am there, I feel as if I am with family, when I am at another resort, I feel guilty, as if I am cheating on her.

I may not always live in Salt Lake City, but my heart will always belong to Alta. Maybe I'm nuts?
post #3 of 24
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by AltaSkier:


I may not always live in Salt Lake City, but my heart will always belong to Alta. Maybe I'm nuts?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

not even a little bit
post #4 of 24
Lisamarie

If you went last year you may not have been so in love, I think the gondola only went in last summer. The old gondola was not the best.

I expect Mark has found plenty for him too, our favourite was Goats Eye, we are definitiely not up to Delirium Dive.

Glad to hear you are enjoying it.
post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
We may check out Goat's eye tomorrow. Thanks!
post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 
OOPs!! A little bit of a mishap on Wed. We were skiing on World Cup Run, which was an easy blue cruiser. Suddenly it started to snow, and we ended up in white out conditions, unable to read the trail signs. I followed mark over to one part of the trail, thinking I was still on Blue terrain.

The suddenly... Toto, I have a feeling I'm not on a Blue square anymore. I've made mistakes like this where I was uncomfortable skiing. But finding myself on what I later found out was a steep narrow Black diamond bump run was basically impossible.

My first instinct was to try to side slip. Fact: You can not side slip a bump run. Then I realized I was messing up the moguls, and probably getting everyone very angry, so I tried to ski it.

But then , the thing that practically NEVER happens to me in my 3 years of skiing....

OOoo hoo hoo hooo... WIPE OUT!!!!!

Ouch!! Ego bruised and shattered!! But even though it was a butt plant, body intact! However, how's this for humiliation? A darling little 4 year old girl skis up to me and says "Are you alright, can I help you up?"

WHAAA!!!

Nonetheless, I lived to tell the tale. What is so interesting, not one person plowed into me, even though I was in the middle of a narrow trail. I f this happened at Killington, I'd be toast!

Guess I'm not yet ready to ski a black diamond bump run in the Rockies, eh?

Displaying my gaper status with pride,
Lisa
post #7 of 24
Lisa, if you don't fall, you're not trying hard enough.

Well done!


S
post #8 of 24
Lisamarie - WTFH is right.

If I don't fall once a day (not in the lift line) I know I ain't been tryin'.

You go girl!
post #9 of 24
Lisa:

I'm going to reiterate what Fox Hat and Jimmy have already said...

The longer you've skied and the more places you've been, the less a fall seems to mean. If you aren't falling occasionally, you *really* aren't pushing the envelope.

Early in a skier's career, a fall seems to be a no-no - a place that no one wants to be. Later on, it becomes an indication that you're willing to push what you've done before. You don't mind the idea that you (or someone else)h hasn't been able to go beyond that particular point.

At some level, your personal accomplishment goes past comparisons with others and becomes simply a question of what *you* can do.

Once you reach that level, you understand that this is a game of pushing yourself and not comparing to other standards. Everyone comes to every endeavor (music, SAT's, Olympic medals) from a different stage, and you need to figure out what's reasonable and what's *attainable* for you.

What's great about the Olympics is that we can all watch the very best in the world at every single winter sport and see what's possible.

Bob
post #10 of 24
LM

If there was a resort somewhere that did not have trail signs I bet you would have a ball just skiing and not thinking.

As for falls well I had two huge headplants in the deep pow on wednesday. They came about as I was hitting the deepest drifts I could find. There is nothing funnier than playing "dead ant" in a deep drift. Cause and affect. Too much fun. Get amongst it.

Oz [img]smile.gif[/img]

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ February 23, 2002 12:44 PM: Message edited 2 times, by man from oz ]</font>
post #11 of 24
Yeah, I forgot to add how much fun a face plant in powder is!


Oh, and my philosophy also works for drinking!


S
post #12 of 24
Why does she need to push her limits?
post #13 of 24
Because, according to some on another thread, limits are only social norms made to be broken.

But, in my opinion when it comes to sport it has to do with self improvement, and adrenalin.


S
post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 
The lesson learned on this trip, between Sunshine and Fernie, is that even if I accidentally get myself into a situation which is a bit beyond what I can handle technically, being reasonably strong and balanced, I can pretty much "negotiate" my way down. Although I would not purposely go out of my way to do this all the time, its nice to know that situations that may seem terrifying can be dealt with, and the only true blow will be to my ego.

MOST important, is that even with this minor upset, Sunshine is STILL my favorite ski resort! [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #15 of 24
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Bob.Peters:
Later on, it becomes an indication that you're willing to push what you've done before.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Also falls seem to be getting more spectacular. : My wife constantly gets a kick out it. Her conclusion last year was: "You rarely fall, but if you do it is highspeed wipe out with both bindings releasing, followed by a long slide with snow flying everywhere." Love this stuff!!!
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Yeah, but it was really "fun" trying to figureout how the heck to get the skis back on when you are knee deep in powder! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #17 of 24
Were you wearing powder cords?

My very first run of the day at Grand Targhee three weeks ago, I went into the woods, crashed, and lost one of my skis in the thigh deep powder. It took me over 10 minutes to find it... very sobering.
post #18 of 24
Agree with the falling issues above. The down side of improving technique, however, is that the falls seem to occur at higher speed. In addition, I find I now fall forward; in the old days, when leaning back was the usual problem, the falls tended to involve a less easily injured portion of my anatomy.

WFTH -- I completely agree with the joy of a faceplant in deep powder -- especially when it is deep enough to end up completely submerged, surrounded by that quiet, cold deep blue. On the other hand, I reminded myself yesterday that I do not enjoy face planting in hard, suncrusted mogul fields...
post #19 of 24
IMHO, half the fun of enjoying a great powder day, or any day for that matter, is being with friends and watching a great fall (with no injuries), and the occasional great recovery!

Sometimes we are laughing so hard at ourselves...the fresh snow jammed in your helmet, dumping snow out of your jacket, trying to get your ski(s) on in the deep stuff...that I'm sure others think we have lost it!

Well, we haven't "lost it", in fact I tend to feel like we sometimes have actually finally "gotten it"...the pure joy of skiing!

BTW, those bad falls, which can land you in the hospital, and put you out of comission for a long time, really do suck! :
post #20 of 24
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lisamarie:
This has got to be my all time favorite place. Nice wide blue cruisers, beautiful scenery, a gondola system that Whistler should try to copy, you gotta LOVE this place! [img]smile.gif[/img]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

What place are you talking about LM?
post #21 of 24
Ryel,
I think she's talking about Sunshine resort.
But I would have to say, I'm perfectly happy with the gondolas in Whistler. If they went any faster there wouldn't be enough time to enjoy the ride.

S
post #22 of 24
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lisamarie:
Yeah, but it was really "fun" trying to figureout how the heck to get the skis back on when you are knee deep in powder! [img]smile.gif[/img]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I have LOOK bindings that can be pulled on by hand, so you don't have to push down to click in. They have the long bit that goes up the back of the boot once on. Has saved me a lot of anguish many times.

I always use powder cords on deep powder days, have watched too many skiers lose half the day trying to find a buried ski. It is amazing how far they can travel under the snow without disturbing the surface.

The fact that I fall so often in powder makes all this very necessary. But it is so much fun and you rarely hurt yourself. Can be very tiring getting yourself back up and going again though.
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Ryel, I was talking about Sunshine resort. Serves me right for coming up with such a hoaky title! On the gondala thing, standing up for 20 minutes with a bunch of people for whom garlic is the breakfast food of choice is not my idea of a good time. I have to do that on the subway every day! That's why, if I have a choice, I use the Blackcomb gondola!
post #24 of 24
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by man from oz:
LM

If there was a resort somewhere that did not have trail signs I bet you would have a ball just skiing and not thinking.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Amen, bro!

Keep falling LM-- it's one of the keys to progressing.
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