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Jay Peak: Anti-American or Pro-Canada?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Jay Peak accepts Canadian $$s at par but only for Canadians. This means Canadians pay roughly $37 (US) for a day of skiing, but US citizens pay $54. Do any other places do this? I assume Canadian ski areas don't give US citizens a discount?
post #2 of 28
It is "unfair," but whenever I ski in Eastern Canada, the lift tix usually come in around $25 US and the accomodations are also laughably cheap.

Jay Peak is great, but $52 is a pretty big pile of change, and I ain't gonna pay it unless they just got a foot of snow. Thus, they've lost my business two times this year to mountains in the Eastern Townships of Quebec.

Wish they still had their weekday internet coupons from last year ($32).
post #3 of 28
i don't think the exchange (or lack there of) is unfair. this happens everywhere along the border on both sides for all sorts of businesses. businesses try to get people to cross the border and working the exchange rate to the guests advantage is a huge marketing draw. all jay is doing is ignoring the exchange rate, which essentially makes it so jay makes less money per canadian customers vs. U.S. customers.

in any case, i just skied jay for the first time this past monday, and Jay is not worth $52! yuck! it's an okay mountain, nothing special unless you love glades and powder (i don't care much for either).
post #4 of 28
Could you just exchange your American dollars for Canadian ones? Or do they check ID's? That way, you would get the advantage of the exchange rate, thus reducing your costs? A local bank can usually do this for you.
post #5 of 28
Nice try, but they started checking IDs this year (understandably).
post #6 of 28
Alright, try this:

1. Establish residence in Canada
2. Ski at Jay for less!

Seems logical to me, jeeze, do I have to spell everything out!
post #7 of 28
duh, it's exchange rate based.

Here's how it works:
1US$ = $1.62 Canadian.
1 CAN$ = ยข.60 US

I live very close to the border here in thePNW, and many business take Canadian at par.

So, 57 US does = $33 canandian, so what.
If you are cranky about it, taek a trip up north, you will feel better... US dollars will get you quite the discount in Canada.

Everything is priced about the same number wise, but then you just mulitply it back out by the exchange rate for your discount. For example, a day ticket at Red Mtn is about $$35 Canadian, that's $22 for me (plus half off but that's another story) and the hotel package (ski/stay) was $550 Canadian, but only cost me $330.


Irulan
post #8 of 28
Jay really HAS to draw a sizeable crowd from north of the border. American skiers and riders from "downcountry" really have to want to go to Jay. All the other VT, NH, and NY areas are so much easier to get to.
Besides, the Canadians I see there take their skiing very seriously. It's almost a sure bet if you see someone taking a zipper line down the bumps, at the bottom, you'll hear them speaking French.
post #9 of 28
Irulan... i think the original point was it's not exchange rate based... jay accepts canadian money at par with USD for candian residents... meaning canadians pay $52 canadian while U.S. residents pay $52 USD, which means canadians are essentially paying around $33 USD for the same skiing on any given day.
post #10 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Nothing special unless you love glades and powder (i don't care much for either).<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Shirley? You can't be serious.
post #11 of 28
I agree. I also don't like skiing in Europe because the mountains are too big and the terrain is too interesting. And I hate how the snow in western Canada gets so deep. I wish they would enclose all ski hills so we could have all snowmaking snow and ski only on groomers.
post #12 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by riverc0il:
Irulan... i think the original point was it's not exchange rate based... jay accepts canadian money at par with USD for candian residents... meaning canadians pay $52 canadian while U.S. residents pay $52 USD, which means canadians are essentially paying around $33 USD for the same skiing on any given day. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Actually that IS exactly what I am talking about, it's only that Jay is choosing to exchange the $$ themselves (after they receive it), instead of accepting only American $$. Business do it that way all the time around here "Canadian accetped on par" is a sign I see many places 'round here.

But when I go to canada and pay with dollars, everyone pulls the calculator out!!
post #13 of 28
Geoff', no kidding here... i was very disappointed with Jay Peak after hearing so many people rave about it. again, i don't care for big powder or glades, so i found nothing special about Jay, especially considering the outrageous price. i could have found equal or better terrain and atmosphere half as far from home, for half the price. sorry, just my opinion.
post #14 of 28
Wait a second... Jay Peak's two most important (and marketed) features are:
a) lots of glades
b) lots of snow (far more than anywhere else in the East, and last year, more than anywhere else in North America.)

You went there and were unhappy with their product. Isn't that like me going to Jackson Hole and then complaining about the unrelenting steepness and difficulty of its terrain?

Maybe a little homework is needed before you make such a long trip.
post #15 of 28
For what it's worth: We Vermonters also get a break to ski at Jay and do not pay full US price, but we need to show our driver's license. Jay can have crappy snow days, but in most years, they have the better snow. Also, the lift lines are shorter. It's ok with me if someone stays away because they don't care for powder [!]

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ February 28, 2002 08:43 AM: Message edited 1 time, by oboe ]</font>
post #16 of 28
i was not complaining or anything, i was just saying that i thought i would have enjoyed the mountain more than i did.

do only people who love powder and glades go to jay? NO. do only people who love unrelenting steepness and difficulty of its terrain go to jackson hole? NO. i simply said i was disappointed cause i had expected more. i had high expectations, and didn't feel the mountain did my time and money justice for my own personal experience. i never said it was a bad mountain; just said it wasn't for me, okay????

btw, i did lots of homework. that's pretty ignorant of you to assume that i hadn't. haven't you ever gone some place that got rave reviews and been disappointed? i've wanted to try jay for a long time, not for powder and glades, but because it looked like an interesting mountain that had a lot to offer. also, i would eventually like to ski every open ski area in new england so it's been on my list... i love seeing new places and trying new things.

maybe you should try being less sarcastic, demeaning, and ignorent in your posts? thanks.

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by jamesdeluxe:
Wait a second... Jay Peak's two most important (and marketed) features are:
a) lots of glades
b) lots of snow (far more than anywhere else in the East, and last year, more than anywhere else in North America.)

You went there and were unhappy with their product. Isn't that like me going to Jackson Hole and then complaining about the unrelenting steepness and difficulty of its terrain?

Maybe a little homework is needed before you make such a long trip.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
post #17 of 28
Oil:

After I posted the offending last sentence, I was going to edit it out, but got busy at work and forgot.

I certainly agree with your last post about wishing you had enjoyed a mountain more than you did (I always have much more fun at Sutton than Jay, even though Jay is technically the better ski area).

But the way you phrased your first post seemed odd -- going to Jay and not liking the glades & powder... kind of like moving next to a swamp and complaining about mosquitos. Sorry for the misunderstanding.
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 
Well, I sent an email to the pres of Jay Peak regarding their Canadian/US discount policy, and below is his response. He convinced me...As a matter of fact I think
I'm heading up Saturday...

<Snip>------------
From: "Bill Stenger" <bstenger@jaypeakresort.com>
Subject: Re: Canadian Discount

Return-Path: <bstenger@jaypeakresort.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Reply-To: <bstenger@jaypeakresort.com>
X-Mailer: <IMail v7.05>

Thanks for your e-mail!

We give Canadian residents at par rates for $52.00
lift tickets. We have a market where one-half of
our guests are Canadian and one-half are U.S. The
Canadian dollar is $.62 U.S. and if we did not
accept the Canadians at par they would not be able
to ski here. A $52.00 U.S. lift ticket is over
$80.00 Canadian.

What you seem not to know is what we do have for
U.S. skiers. We have a Passport Program that allows
U.S. skiers to buy 4 lift tickets for $40.00 each
and get the 5th ticket free. The card costs $25.00
to buy and it has many other discounts also.
Details are on our website.

You mentioned in your e-mail you are in a college
club. We extend to college students a great
discount of $26.00 U.S. anytime. Furthermore, we
also work with clubs who have meaningfully sized
memberships and give them a special rate of $35.00
when they present their membership card.

I hope you see that we dont try to screw
anyone but rather, make skiing affordable to all.
Vermonters ski for $35.00 and local B&Bs have
vouchers for their guests at $35.00 U.S.

So between the college programs, club specials,
passport program and and B&B offerings we provide
our U.S. guests some great bargains.

I hope this explanation helps you understand Jay
Peak is still the best buy in Eastern skiing.

Bill Stenger

P.S. I forgot to mention that we accept season
passes from other areas for $26.00 U.S. You wont
find that anywhere else!

Bill Stenger
President
Jay Peak Resort
Rt. 242
Jay, VT 05859
802-988-2611 www.jaypeakresort.com

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ February 28, 2002 09:44 PM: Message edited 1 time, by yoyo ]</font>
post #19 of 28
Nice work!
post #20 of 28
You da man, YoYo...

I've almost completely given up on their newly-designed website, and didn't take the time to find out about that Passport Program, which is a reasonable deal for those of us who aren't Vermont residents. I defy you to find mention of the program anywhere on the site:
http://www.jaypeakresort.com/page.asp?intNodeID=2793

edit: I found it on the left side of the page... when I originally saw the word "passport", I assumed it had something to do with border regulations (seeing that the mountain is so close to the US/Canada border), and didn't click on it.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ March 01, 2002 06:55 AM: Message edited 1 time, by jamesdeluxe ]</font>
post #21 of 28
post #22 of 28
YOUR PASSPORT TO SAVINGS!
With the Passport Card, you can save big on lift tickets and get on-property discounts, too!

Right at the bottom of main page under lodging specials...
post #23 of 28
One point worthy of noting. Jay is Canadian owned and operated..
post #24 of 28
Just returning from Jay this weekend, so here are some thoughts. Jay is hands down the best skiing on the East coast. No other mountain even comes close. On Saturday snow was fantastic, so I spent the whole day in the glades. The glades are numerous and fun as hell. A bit tighter than in the West, with a lot more brush, but it's a good deterrent for the people that have no business there. The challenge factor is present in full force. For the trully badass, from the top of the tram you will find a 50' rock cliff with very narrow chutes dropping into 70 degree pitched glade, which will eventually mellow out. The rock formation is rather reminiscent of western skiing. Top to bottom freshie can be found by hiking the ridge over to Big Jay (mountain in the back of Jay Peak). The hike takes about an hour. From what I hear it was a 2 hour bushwhack until sombody cut a trail. God bless that man!!! There is still an hour long bushwhack to get to road from the bottom of Big Jay, but for fresh, soft and fluffy snow it's well worth it. Jay gets 350" of powder every year. Last year (a freak year) the got close to 600", the most snow in the country. Next season I am buying a season pass and renting a house, I am that sold on the place. And it is a 7 hour drive for me.
post #25 of 28
Just a note of caution.....some guy (and this was a college student!) got lost for three days in the woods between Jay and Big Jay this past season. There are warning signs posted for those who venture beyond that they are leaving the ski area.
As for those chutes, one of the "ballsiest" moves I ever saw on skis was a Jay instructor straightlining one of them on an icy day, when the sun's reflection told you there was no powder in that chute.
post #26 of 28
Who the hell pays list price at Jay?

Or anywhere else for that matter?

I only STARTED skiing 14 months ago and I know there are too many deals to be had damn near everywhere.

I'm in a club thats a member of the NJ ski council, meaning I pay $39/ticket.
I also pay $33 for Sugarbush and $32 for MRG.

Not to mention the sweet lodge on the mountain that hits me for $50 for a 2-day/2-night stay that includes 2 breakfasts & 1 dinner.

Anybody who pays full price is quite possibly a sucker.
post #27 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hugo:
Just a note of caution.....some guy (and this was a college student!) got lost for three days in the woods between Jay and Big Jay this past season. There are warning signs posted for those who venture beyond that they are leaving the ski area.
As for those chutes, one of the "ballsiest" moves I ever saw on skis was a Jay instructor straightlining one of them on an icy day, when the sun's reflection told you there was no powder in that chute.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


I picked up David Goodman's books on New England backcountry, and it spells out to the tee where you need to go and where to end up. If you dig on Vermont BC you probably already have them, if not they will point you to a couple of new spots that are worth the trip for sure. On a sidenote, how the hell do you get lost for days in the back of Jay? The service road is right there... Unless that kid had absolutely no sense of where he was... I don't know, some people just want to make Darwin Awards I guess.
post #28 of 28
The newspaper story said he was an experienced skier. Experienced in WHAT?
To top it off, he was with friends!
Just one of those stories that makes you shake your head.....
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