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Last skiing for the year - VIDEO - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post


Do I really need to answer this?

Pressure created by centrifugal forces and centripetal forces from the snow/ski interaction. Also turning and gravity create some of these forces.

If you are patient and accurately guide the skis to an edge, they will interact with the snow, and begin to turn. The guide to an edge will require turning your femurs in the hip sockets (passive rotary if you will) as the skis engage and begin to turn and bend, there will be forces being built up as well. If you don't balance against the pressure or push back (manage) with correct amount, you will upset the balance. tdk6 shows the balance skills to keep from falling over. Physics tell us the weight will go to the outside ski. Trying to push too hard on the inside ski will also upset the balance. Just bracing against the forces will almost always cause the ski to break away. By relaxing or letting go of some of the pressure, you dissipate some of the energy (also a form of managing pressure)

By learning to "feel, and adjust" to what the terrain, snow, and skis throw at you, you can make the turns more and more efficient.

 

Thumbs Up 

post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 

 

I agree perfectly on the up and down acceleration momentum being important. Sometimes when your timing is perfect you can actually keep your upper body vertically stable and just flex and extend your legs and still have sufficient up-down acceleration through inertia but most of the time this up-down movement needs to be present. If you look at guys like Reilly you can see that his CoM goes up and down quite a lot while he still flexes to release. And retracts his legs through the transition. This is the contradicting part. You go up as you flex. You go down as you extend.

 

Regarding 1. Inclining at the top of the turn and at apex kicking in with angulation, counter and tipping progressively. Forcing vaulting at the end of the turn. Triggering the vaulting effect by releasing the outside ski late. Vaulting starts before the release. This is what Ted told me when I spoke to him. Hold on to your edge angles and outside ski pressure all the way to the very end of the turn. Aim for that Crossing effect when skis cross the path of your CoM. Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't it so that Reilly's hips are lifted up from close to the snow into the toilet seat transition position by the vaulting effect?

That exactly it. You talked to Ted Ligety? Cool..

Regarding Ted I like this freesking clip. So smooth and easy looking but yet with the acceleration and tight apex.

post #33 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post
 

That exactly it. You talked to Ted Ligety? Cool..

Regarding Ted I like this freesking clip. So smooth and easy looking but yet with the acceleration and tight apex.

 

That is also a great video. I've watched it many times. I was fortunate enough to sit next to him on a plane to the Levi WC opening race a few years back. I really like to watch WC skiers ski out of the gates. I think its quite revealing. On a race course on TV its merely surviving. When they train they display much better form and try to keep all movements disciplined. In that clip of Ted he starts the turn by inclining and then snaps the turn around. The strongest pressure right after apex. Then he angulates and tips as he brings his outside arm forward to create momentum and release out of the turn by vaulting. There is a strong up and down movement going on. Up and down and forwards.

 

Check this video of Palander:

post #34 of 47

very nice skiing and camera work. How did you shoot this video if you don't mind me asking?

post #35 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil J View Post
 

very nice skiing and camera work. How did you shoot this video if you don't mind me asking?

 

Hi, thank you. The original video in this thread and the slow motion video in posting #22 were shot by my 15 year old son with a 7y old Panasonic HDC-SD700 video camera. It fits in the pocket of my jacket or west as in this case and then we stop and film each other. I have the same material from my sons skiing. The camera is hand held. Then I edit it on my computer with Movie Studio Platinum 13.0.

post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogaman View Post
 

What the hell does it mean to manage the pressure????  How, where, why, when.  What will the result be if you "manage" the pressure.      Do I want more pressure, less pressure and when?     Where does this pressure come from?     YM


BTW, If this was meant to make me "rephrase" using more accurate terms and descriptions, because we are all not instructors, Thank you for the reminder. I should know better. Especially since I just finished the exam process to move on to the next part of my journey.

post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post


Do I really need to answer this?

Pressure created by centrifugal forces and centripetal forces from the snow/ski interaction. Also turning and gravity create some of these forces.

If you are patient and accurately guide the skis to an edge, they will interact with the snow, and begin to turn. The guide to an edge will require turning your femurs in the hip sockets (passive rotary if you will) as the skis engage and begin to turn and bend, there will be forces being built up as well. If you don't balance against the pressure or push back (manage) with correct amount, you will upset the balance. tdk6 shows the balance skills to keep from falling over. Physics tell us the weight will go to the outside ski. Trying to push too hard on the inside ski will also upset the balance. Just bracing against the forces will almost always cause the ski to break away. By relaxing or letting go of some of the pressure, you dissipate some of the energy (also a form of managing pressure)

By learning to "feel, and adjust" to what the terrain, snow, and skis throw at you, you can make the turns more and more efficient.


????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????   YM

post #38 of 47

@tdk6 there seem to be some lateral balance issues - looking at your hands... but the snow looks solid enough and I'm assuming you're happy with the boots?

 

Doing those large radius turns on the short twitchy boards may have something to do with it?

 

:ski

post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
....

Check this out:

 

 

On the left the traditional "Superman" drill. On the right the reverse Superman drill I call "007". The photos should be quite comparable since they are taken from the same footage. Especially the ones in the lower row look interesting. Don't you think. MA please.

Tom, I love seeing your turns looking so smooth.  Great skiing.

 

As for the above...

On the left is the drill I know as the Schlopy drill.  I've never heard it called the Superman drill, but that makes sense too.  

Doing it the way you show on the left promotes moving the inside hip/shoulder forward/up, outside hip/shoulder back/down (counter and angulation all rolled into one).

Your images on the right - I've never seen anyone do that, except my students when they get the Schlopy backwards.  

Would you mind describing what your goal was with moving the outside hand/shoulder forward at the bottom of the turn.

post #40 of 47

Sue, i was thinking the same thing. I have only seen it done with the inside hand leading the way.

post #41 of 47
Thread Starter 

Its a drill I picked up from a video made by Tina Maze's coach. I call it the 007. He talked about two things. Keeping your shoulders and upper body facing down hill when making short turns down the fall line but to square up to your skis with your shoulders and chest when going more across the hill as in GS type turns. Try to get the momentum to release forwards towards the next gate. This is what Fox called a 3-way separation where you still keep your hips into the turn but you reach forwards with your outside arm. What do you think?

post #42 of 47
I kinda with @JamT on the GS race ski point...(tho I love fast medium radius turns on my Volkl Racetiger FIS 165 SL )

I had a long history of loving GS race skis back in the day but towards the end of this season I grabbed a pair of 2009 Racetiger GS 175 with 9mm piston plates and a 21 radius (women's ski) and loved lockin em up on edge - a more pure carved turn in medium radius turns than the 13 radius SL

I'm thinking a short FIS GS ski would be just as much fun for the OP as the itty bitty Redsters!! Just a bigger radius take on the same idea.....and moving the binding position around on both of my Volkl race skis is a blast too! Love, love Marker Piston plates!

Nice skiing @tdk6, your posts are always inspiring!!
post #43 of 47

I'll give it a try. 

post #44 of 47
Thread Starter 

Found an old video I made in 2013 of me carving on a pair of SG skis. Remastered it to give it better quality. To me carving is carving and the turn radius does not matter that much. But what do you think:

 

post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogaman View Post


????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????   YM

You don't understand that flexing and/or extending can change the pressures on the skis????????????
post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post


You don't understand that flexing and/or extending can change the pressures on the skis????????????

My comment ??????????????????????? was in response to another post.  I felt that the poster was giving advice that was vague and esoteric in nature.   I thought the comments lacked specificity and value.   When coaching it is generally best to give input that can be understood.   Simple and to the point.    I was looking for specifics. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by yogaman View Post
 

What the hell does it mean to manage the pressure????  How, where, why, when.  What will the result be if you "manage" the pressure.      Do I want more pressure, less pressure and when?       YM

post #47 of 47

Jamt and tdk6, I thoroughly enjoyed the interactive posts and supplemental videos between you two above.  Very insightful.  Thanks Thumbs Up          @tdk6 @Jamt

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