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Good enough goggles for less than $100????

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 

Would anyone care to suggest a source of practical helmet fitting goggles at a economical price point?

 

It seems there is some pricing standardization in the market.  Where are the outliers?

post #2 of 34

what do you mean by source?  you mean where to buy cheaper good googles, or do you mean you need specific models.

 


Source for discounted goggles (e.g. previous unsold from years):

evo.com

skis.com

levelninesports

 

You will have to still figure out what "good enough" means to you and what fits your face as well as your helmet.


All these places have reasonable return policies too.

post #3 of 34

You can pickup Smith IO7's for under $100 if you keep an eye out.

post #4 of 34
They suck. Worst goggles I've ever owned.
post #5 of 34
Thread Starter 

I was thinking of "optional brand" type sources.  Sort of like "Free the Powder" gloves.

 

The internet is always good for finding "deals",  as well as Not so good deals.

 

Sib

can you describe the deficiencies of the "worst goggles "?  It's hard to tell from the pictures ;-)

post #6 of 34
The goggles leak. The lens just rests against the frame with no protective gasket, so moisture trickles through any slight gap. The little twisty thing at the top of the goggles which holds the lens onto the frame is easily dislodged, so the lens comes loose along the entire top edge. Trying to move the goggles off your face frequently results in the lens being yanked off. It's just a horrible design. I have a cheaper pair from Smith, the Squad, and it's far better. I was training myself to only move the goggles using both hands on either side of the goggles, but the leaking problem was just the last straw. I was getting a hard bar of thick ice along the whole top inch of the goggle, getting larger and thicker with every run. Seriously, could only go two to three runs without a trip inside. Started packing two pair, the I/O 7 and the old pair of Squads, and finally left the I/O 7 in the locker. I'm used to skiing "in the fog", but I don't need to carry it with me inside a goggle.

I've written to Smith, we'll see what happens.
Edited by sibhusky - 3/18/17 at 5:35pm
post #7 of 34
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the comments.  I've seen the goggles and the lens retention mechanism,  but leaking around the lens is a big NO!

post #8 of 34

At the risk of being untrendy, I've used Bolle Mojo's that we can get in Canada for $34.  They were perfectly functional for me. 

post #9 of 34

I have a pair of Habers I use occasionally. Pretty good value proposition, but I found they frosted up on real cold Vermont days. They have a website. No retail outlets.

post #10 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
 

Would anyone care to suggest a source of practical helmet fitting goggles at a economical price point?

 

It seems there is some pricing standardization in the market.  Where are the outliers?


I find these just fine for all conditions.  Been using for over 12 years now so the elastic is all stretched out.  Used over 100 days per season.

I'm going to get another pair real soon now. 

I'm sure you can find these at many shops for the same cost.   Link: https://the-raceplace.com/collections/helmets-goggles/products/2017-uvex-fire-race-goggle

post #11 of 34

You need to try the goggles.  My favorites may not work well for you, and vice versa.  Go to a shop on a gray day.  Arrange to take several goggles to the window, hold each up to your eyes, and see which works best for you.

post #12 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The goggles leak. The lens just rests against the frame with no protective gasket, so moisture trickles through any slight gap. The little twisty thing at the top of the goggles which holds the lens onto the frame is easily dislodged, so the lens comes loose along the entire top edge. Trying to move the goggles off your face frequently results in the lens being yanked off. It's just a horrible design. I have a cheaper pair from Smith, the Squad, and it's far better. I was training myself to only move the goggles using both hands on either side of the goggles, but the leaking problem was just the last straw. I was getting a hard bar of thick ice along the whole top inch of the goggle, getting larger and thicker with every run. Seriously, could only go two to three runs without a trip inside. Started packing two pair, the I/O 7 and the old pair of Squads, and finally left the I/O 7 in the locker. I'm used to skiing "in the fog", but I don't need to carry it with me inside a goggle.

I've written to Smith, we'll see what happens.

 

Surprised with your experience.  I've skied with mine for 2 season and have not had any of the problems you've had.  My only complaint is the lens swap isn't as easy as they make it out to be.

 

Hope Smith makes it right.

post #13 of 34

 I think you can do a lot better that just "good enough" for under $100, and you just have to use the first page of Google as your source.

 

As others have stated, goggle fit and optics are very personal, so specific recommendations do not always work, but there is a huge range of discounted, brand name goggles to choose from. Buying last year's model on discount may not get you the exact lens/frame combination you desire, but still far superior than Good Enough.

 

In the last few season's I have purchased the following goggles for under $100 delivered, some with dual lenses;

 

Von Zipper Fishbowls, the best peripheral vision out there

Oakley Crossbow, the best low cost anti fog goggles

Smith IO, a little limited on visibility, but nice range of lenses

Electric 2.5, stylish, but tend to fog

post #14 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmr40 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The goggles leak. The lens just rests against the frame with no protective gasket, so moisture trickles through any slight gap. The little twisty thing at the top of the goggles which holds the lens onto the frame is easily dislodged, so the lens comes loose along the entire top edge. Trying to move the goggles off your face frequently results in the lens being yanked off. It's just a horrible design. I have a cheaper pair from Smith, the Squad, and it's far better. I was training myself to only move the goggles using both hands on either side of the goggles, but the leaking problem was just the last straw. I was getting a hard bar of thick ice along the whole top inch of the goggle, getting larger and thicker with every run. Seriously, could only go two to three runs without a trip inside. Started packing two pair, the I/O 7 and the old pair of Squads, and finally left the I/O 7 in the locker. I'm used to skiing "in the fog", but I don't need to carry it with me inside a goggle.

I've written to Smith, we'll see what happens.

 

Surprised with your experience.  I've skied with mine for 2 season and have not had any of the problems you've had.  My only complaint is the lens swap isn't as easy as they make it out to be.

 

Hope Smith makes it right.

The lens fit is tricky. I have trouble getting the nose piece properly seated--seems like the tab is a little too big for the slot. I have some I/Os as well that I had trouble with that are ok now so I suspect the plastic on the frame stretches a little with time so the tab goes in easier. I don't have trouble getting a seal at the top but I always check. It's easy to close the twisty thing and not have it grab the lens. I rarely ski with an extra lens in my pocket so I'm wondering why I bother with interchangeable lenses. For the occasional skier it might (or might not) be cheaper than buying two pairs of goggles, but don't most of us have dozens of accumulated goggles lying around? (I have a dresser drawer full of old goggles and another full of old gloves. And a cabinet shelf with old boot parts for boots I no longer have. And dozens of keys that don't go to anything I can think of.)  And for that matter I can't say I can actually see any better--just brighter--with low light lenses. Most of us would probably be just as well off with one pair of rose goggles and maybe a bright light pair for spring. (I use glacier glasses in the spring but I ski so blazingly fast that my eyes tear up from the wind getting through.)

If I'm ever in Whitefish I'll buy those I/O7's from you for half price; I still have some room in that dresser drawer for them.

 

Getting back to the the subject--I've had good deals on goggles from Sierra Trading Post although right now I don't see any, or much ski gear at all. Look in the fall.

What's a good enough goggle? I would say a medium VLT lens, double lens, antifog coating, and some kind of venting. Goggles that fog are worse than no goggles.

post #15 of 34
oldgoats min requirements are good. I would add at least a mention of scratch resistant for outer lens.

then for a helmet you need to also check that it mentions at least something about helmet compatible (meaning they made the straps long enough) and having silicone strip is nice to have so it doesn't slide as much, but not required.

finally if it's too cheap double check you're not accidentally buying youth goggles.

to the price consideratuons. you can get discounted goggle from the major brand name players for relatively cheap, so it begins to be diminishing returns of saving I'm not seeing a big demand where a 2nd tier can jump in.

say you got an eBay pair of $15 goggles. if it ruins even a couple of runs for you, you are net negative. taking the slippery slope then if you go and get a $2 pair of goggles. that's 95% cheaper, but you'll have to pay 5000 for the eye surgery you need after your retinas are burned out down thr road.
a mom and pop cannot just put together an optical quality product with permanent antifog coatings in their garage.
post #16 of 34

Spy Doom with "Happy Lens" - same as smith chromapop with 2 lenses are available on ebay in the (half price) $100 price point. Easiest lens change imaginable, and they don't fog

post #17 of 34

I read with amazement the threads like this about goggles and their issues.  I've been skiing a long time and I've always bought the cheapest ones I can find that have a double lens (at least since double lenses were made available).  I've never had a fogging issue with any of them and I've always had ones that fit my helmet without paying any attention to that detail which I always remember after purchase.  I've never paid close to $100 and I've never cared about who made them.  I just go into the shop at the ski area and pick the cheap ones because the last ones I had were finished with their life.  I can see OK with any of them and haven't noticed any real differences between brands or colors.

 

Just lucky I guess.

post #18 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

I read with amazement the threads like this about goggles and their issues.  I've been skiing a long time and I've always bought the cheapest ones I can find that have a double lens (at least since double lenses were made available).  I've never had a fogging issue with any of them and I've always had ones that fit my helmet without paying any attention to that detail which I always remember after purchase.  I've never paid close to $100 and I've never cared about who made them.  I just go into the shop at the ski area and pick the cheap ones because the last ones I had were finished with their life.  I can see OK with any of them and haven't noticed any real differences between brands or colors.

 

Just lucky I guess.

Not lucky, just smart. The only expensive goggles I've had that i think were worth the money were Smith Turbos, when I used to wear glasses. 

 

As far as helmet compatibility--does anyone make goggles that won't fit over a helmet any more? 

As far a scratch resistance, stay away from Chromopop (but now we're not talking about cheap goggles any more, although my son got me mine for half off with his military discount.

post #19 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

As far as helmet compatibility--does anyone make goggles that won't fit over a ski (ed.) helmet any more?

 

 

On Ebay?  Absolutely - especially if they're using paintball-type frame designs.

post #20 of 34
From a manufacturers standpoint, "helmet compatible" just means that the strap attaches to the front of the goggle frame. It does not mean that your goggles will fit comfortably on your face with no gaps.
post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
 

Would anyone care to suggest a source of practical helmet fitting goggles at a economical price point?

 

It seems there is some pricing standardization in the market.  Where are the outliers?

 

Go to Sierra Trading Post and look for the Spy Doom goggles or the Spy Bravo goggles. The Dooms are oversized and the Bravo's a bit smaller. They had them for as low as $65 at one point. I think they are around $85 now. If you can get ones with "Happy Lens" (the lens description will have happy in it, otherwise not happy lens) all the better. Their older lens are pretty good too.

 

I posted a thread about the goggles on this site will lots of info. Basically they are $220 goggles for under $100. I bought a pair for myself and my son and they are great. The Happy lens are better than the std, but the std lens are pretty good too.

post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The goggles leak. The lens just rests against the frame with no protective gasket, so moisture trickles through any slight gap. The little twisty thing at the top of the goggles which holds the lens onto the frame is easily dislodged, so the lens comes loose along the entire top edge. Trying to move the goggles off your face frequently results in the lens being yanked off. It's just a horrible design. I have a cheaper pair from Smith, the Squad, and it's far better. I was training myself to only move the goggles using both hands on either side of the goggles, but the leaking problem was just the last straw. I was getting a hard bar of thick ice along the whole top inch of the goggle, getting larger and thicker with every run. Seriously, could only go two to three runs without a trip inside. Started packing two pair, the I/O 7 and the old pair of Squads, and finally left the I/O 7 in the locker. I'm used to skiing "in the fog", but I don't need to carry it with me inside a goggle.

I've written to Smith, we'll see what happens.

That's interesting. I also own a pair of I/O 7 and couldn't be happier. Never experienced any of the problems you have.

 

Ill second the squad though as a good goggle for under $100.

post #23 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by bttocs View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
 

Would anyone care to suggest a source of practical helmet fitting goggles at a economical price point?

 

It seems there is some pricing standardization in the market.  Where are the outliers?

 

Go to Sierra Trading Post and look for the Spy Doom goggles or the Spy Bravo goggles. The Dooms are oversized and the Bravo's a bit smaller. They had them for as low as $65 at one point. I think they are around $85 now. If you can get ones with "Happy Lens" (the lens description will have happy in it, otherwise not happy lens) all the better. Their older lens are pretty good too.

 

 

 

Not anymore. No goggles on STP at the moment.

post #24 of 34
post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
 

Would anyone care to suggest a source of practical helmet fitting goggles at a economical price point?

 

It seems there is some pricing standardization in the market.  Where are the outliers?


Here you go.  Got mine today.  You can't go wrong with UVEX!  Link to the Race Place in video description.
 

post #26 of 34
Thread Starter 

Thanks Jacques! 

 

The Uvex googles have been a mainstay in our family for over 20 years.  They seem to still be "good enough"! 

post #27 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
 

Thanks Jacques! 

 

The Uvex googles have been a mainstay in our family for over 20 years.  They seem to still be "good enough"! 

Sure you can get cheaper, but they just work.  Or you can spend way way more!  I have other fancy mirrored goggles etc. rose lens stuff etc.  I still like the ones like you see in the video best.  When I take them off I can still see.  Not like a bad post LSD trip!

Take care now.

post #28 of 34
Thread Starter 

I've got a pair of polarized dichroic ski goggles by Alpina

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichroic_filter

 

When those are removed,  the world appears to be a different place.  ;-)

post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
 

I've got a pair of polarized dichroic ski goggles by Alpina

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichroic_filter

 

When those are removed,  the world appears to be a different place.  ;-)


Oh that's great!  If only our eyes were stage lights!  My wife has been teaching stage drama for years.

post #30 of 34

I've got a pair of these you can have cheap. They might fit over a helmet--I've never tried--but that would ruin the effect.

  I actually have a pair. I'm guessing my wife got them at the thrift--we have a ton of useless ski gear from the thrift, but it was all too great of a deal to pass up.

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