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Breaking trail etiquette

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

My skins aren't the greatest, my skis are probably a little too rockered, and let's be honest - I could be in better shape. When I'm going up a trail that is simply too steep, causing me to slide, I sometimes break off and form a new trail, kicking back to the original when it levels out a bit. Am I breaking any unwritten rule doing this? Anything I need to be aware of to be considerate of others?

post #2 of 4

What's your location? Might make a difference.

 

I have read "intro to skinning" type of information that says that following a previous track isn't necessarily the best. It could be set too steep, or have become icy for example.

post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nemesis256 View Post
 

What's your location? Might make a difference.

 

For the most part, Big Cottonwood Canyon in SLC area - Mill-D area specifically. It's generally low-angle stuff that's great for newbies like me.

post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyja View Post
 

My skins aren't the greatest, my skis are probably a little too rockered, and let's be honest - I could be in better shape. When I'm going up a trail that is simply too steep, causing me to slide, I sometimes break off and form a new trail, kicking back to the original when it levels out a bit. Am I breaking any unwritten rule doing this? Anything I need to be aware of to be considerate of others?


The only thing that might make this a no-no is safety.  If your new track somehow takes you across an area that's more likely to slide, that would be a danger to you or possibly another party skinning further down the slope.  There may be times when the person who set the original track did so to avoid little pockets of snow that are more likely to pull out than others. Hopefully you're experienced enough to be able to spot an area like that. 

 

Other than that, I've seen lots of places where alternate tracks have been cut to lessen the slope.  Don't worry about it.  

 

Just make sure when your alternate route is coming back to connect with the "main" track that you don't "merge" in front of a faster person or group coming up the main track.  Traffic jams are not a good practice.

 

Speaking of that... it depends on the terrain, of course, but it's always a good idea to have some separation between individuals when you're working your way uphill.  Separation is a safety thing while going uphill sometimes just as much as it is when going down.  Don't overload the slope.

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