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Ski Lodge Etiquette

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 

One of my peeves is when people leave their junk on a table in the lodge for the whole day.  It's usually obvious becasue there are several bags of gear or food, but no typical table savers like hats and gloves.

 

 If everyone did this there would be not be enough space for everyone.   Is it rude to neatly place the bags on the floor and use the table to eat lunch?

post #2 of 56

Where I ski there are signs asking people not to leave their boot bags and duffels on the chairs and tables. Signs that people widely ignore. 

It's not rude to move their stuff. It's the people who leave the gear who are rude.

post #3 of 56

Tables are for eating, not for storage. Using the tables for their intended purpose is not rude. Preventing others from using them for their intended purpose is rude. 

post #4 of 56

It's a whole big thing here..I nearly got into a fist fight over a table here. Douchebags..

post #5 of 56

We tend to have non-skiing moms/dads "reserving" entire tables- although we rarely have a problem when we just do the "is anyone sitting here right now?  thanks."

 

There's another contingent who bring crockpots, plugged in and on a table while they head out.  Nevermind the obvious safety/trip issue and the signs stating to not do that...  I personally enjoy unplugging them, placing them against the wall, and watching their faces as they dig into cold chili.

post #6 of 56

I don't generally run into this but if a completely unattended table full of gear is the only one available on a crowded day I won't hesitate to sit at it.  Nobody has ever come back and said 'we were sitting there'.

post #7 of 56

Plugging in crock pots?!?  For real?!  And seriously, people leaving gear there for all day at a table?  Forget being discourteous, I'd just be worried that all my stuff would get stolen and/or lost.  Seems downright stupid to me.

 

Where the heck are you guys skiing, anyway?  Granted, I try to generally avoid the base lodges, but I am still there regularly enough and have never seen any of the nonsense you guys are describing.  It can be crowded with people sniping for open seats, but nothing like this sort of behavior.  Count myself lucky, I guess.

post #8 of 56

Most ski resorts have limited cafeteria and dining areas.   Especially on foul weather days such eating areas become packed with the many visitors that either don't have clothing to comfortably cope in such conditions or with novices have not learned how to ski or board in such conditions.  I do recall in the past  similar complaining threads on this board.   Thus those of us that can cope and enjoy the conditions come in at noon for lunch all snow encrusted dripping with icicles only to find no where to sit and eat lunch.  The lines to get food are usually not an issue but rather there is no where to sit.  This person has sometimes resorted to sitting against the wall on the floor and a few times that lead to lots of others doing the same thing.  Rather ridiculous looking across a cafeteria when many people with food plates are on the floor while many tables have no plates and just a lot of clothing and gear squatted over by one or two people.

 

The real solution is for resorts to spend more money on large lodge rooms for non skiers, non boarders, and fair weather visitors to spend a day.  For instance a lodge room with a fireplace, TV's and like entertainment sofa's and chairs, maybe some small drink holding furniture but without food tables.  Maybe some stuff for little kids to play with like an arcade game or three. Even more would be a CCTV camera or two viewing popular slope areas.  And have some kind of system in place to make otherwise squatters not be able to use cafeteria areas. Yeah all this kind of thing costs money, but you bean counters consider how many of we hard core enthusiasts are sick and tired of this decades old unpleasantness.

 

David

post #9 of 56
I usually do the "is anyone sitting here right now" thing.

If people are leaving stuff all day, and it bothers you, just take it to Lost n Found. They can pick it up there.
post #10 of 56
At most resorts it's not just etiquette but a matter of rules. There are plenty of signs at our resort about not bringing your gear inside the lodge, no outside food and drink etc. So the real issue is that the folks who choose to ignore the rules get away with it, because the resort really doesn't want to have to enforce them.

At the end of the day most folks in the lodge have spent money to be there. The Mom saving a table of twelve, with an entire home cooked buffet, probably spent a small fortune on lessons for her kids. The resort could force her to pack up, but they would probably loose out in the long run, so I think they choose to just ignore the rule breakers.
post #11 of 56

It's even better when they bring their mediocre intermediate snowboards or skis in and set them by the table, only to fall over.  Yeah, I have a thing about this kinda thing, I HATE it!! put your shit back in your car, or in a locker, or along the wall, or where ever, and leave your junk skis or snowboards OUTSIDE!!!!! nobody wants them anyways, and if your worried, buy a goddamn lock.  One resort I ski used to have an issue with the crockpotters, but they put up signs not allowing them, but they still leave all their crap all over the tables, while the locker room remains empty. REALLY, you can't afford a dollar token for a locker???

 

ARRRGGGGGHHHHH!!!! LOL!!!

post #12 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by clong83 View Post
 

Plugging in crock pots?!?  For real?!  And seriously, people leaving gear there for all day at a table?  Forget being discourteous, I'd just be worried that all my stuff would get stolen and/or lost.  Seems downright stupid to me.

 

Where the heck are you guys skiing, anyway?  Granted, I try to generally avoid the base lodges, but I am still there regularly enough and have never seen any of the nonsense you guys are describing.  It can be crowded with people sniping for open seats, but nothing like this sort of behavior.  Count myself lucky, I guess.


I saw this at Whiteface Mountain.  Granted, it's dead there mid-week in January..but yah, pots of chili and bottles of wine.  I personally didn't have a problem with it in this case as there were plenty of places to sit.

post #13 of 56

I don't mind people putting their stuff on a table, and then their friends or family that don't ski hanging out all day at the table, but to just leave stuff there hoping you have a seat for lunch, is rather rude.

post #14 of 56

Don't "lodge". The most I might do is run in and grab a coffee and drink it on the lift.

post #15 of 56
Those bags should be put in the "relocation program".

It is one thing to put helmet/gloves while getting food but all day is out of line.
post #16 of 56
Crock pots! Who on earth does that? What's next, BBQ smokers? Giro shish kebab spits?

I've always wondered how the parent could stand hanging out all day in the cafeteria while the family skied. I couldn't do that. I'd have to be skiing too or be elsewhere altogether.
post #17 of 56
Have to say I'd do anything for my kid.
post #18 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post

Have to say I'd do anything for my kid.

How about skiing with him or her?
post #19 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

How about skiing with him or her?

Exactly.

But even beyond that..I can't play hockey with him, but I'd travel and sit and watch a whole day if he enjoyed it.
Edited by Scott43 - 1/11/17 at 6:37am
post #20 of 56

I save the crockpot for the hotel room so there's a prepared dinner when I return!  If done properly you can smell it as soon as the elevator opens on your floor.

post #21 of 56

I carry a small flask filled with Peppermint Schnapps, and add it to my ridiculously expensive hot chocolate to turn it into a Snow Bunny. Despite the rules, is this OK and offset by the cost of my small fortune season pass?

post #22 of 56
I guess I've been skiing so long that my habits enable me to avoid all this. I eat (if I'm going to eat inside, which I haven't the last 16 days) around 11:20-11:30, go back out 25 minutes later and that's it. Being doing that since I used to ski at Camelback. The only place I've ever seen crockpot people was at Jack Frost.

Whitefish has plenty of eating spots relative to our crowd levels. A quick glance inside today shows me that they've eliminated my favourite seating area over the summer. That's a problem. I'll have to start eating downstairs for the price and quiet. I noticed it was packed when I ran in, but I didn't note the time. I did notice that downstairs was a ghost town relative to the ground level.
post #23 of 56

My pet peeve is the locker and the guy who thinks that he gets to sit in front of his locker when it's obvious that it's busy and we all don't get to sit right in front of the locker were renting.I will though,  do my best for women and children.

post #24 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I guess I've been skiing so long that my habits enable me to avoid all this. I eat (if I'm going to eat inside, which I haven't the last 16 days) around 11:20-11:30, go back out 25 minutes later and that's it. Being doing that since I used to ski at Camelback. The only place I've ever seen crockpot people was at Jack Frost.

Whitefish has plenty of eating spots relative to our crowd levels. A quick glance inside today shows me that they've eliminated my favourite seating area over the summer. That's a problem. I'll have to start eating downstairs for the price and quiet. I noticed it was packed when I ran in, but I didn't note the time. I did notice that downstairs was a ghost town relative to the ground level.

Jack Frost does have a room set aside for racers and their parents where you'll see the crock pots, so you know what to expect if you venture in there. I have on a cold busy days and had nice conversations with the both the skiing and non-skiing parents.

Elk's lodge is truly primitive and cramped, but they spend their money elsewhere so I'm okay with the bags crammed anywhere you can find a spot. Most folks are considerate enough to put them under the table. I can barely get my long legs under them anyway on slow days!
post #25 of 56
Thread Starter 

I take a break at the mid mountain lodge if its too busy at the base.

 

I think it's ok if non skiers reserve a table, was more referring to people reserving tables with their junk. Besides, I have learned not to argue with 40 something women.

 

Like the crockpot idea however can see how it could cause problems on busy days.

 

This would never work, but it would be nice to have a warm fireplace for people who ski and are cold from being outside rather than for people who don't ski and read their emails.  

post #26 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter5 View Post
 

I take a break at the mid mountain lodge if its too busy at the base.

 

I think it's ok if non skiers reserve a table, was more referring to people reserving tables with their junk. Besides, I have learned not to argue with 40 something women.

 

Like the crockpot idea however can see how it could cause problems on busy days.

 

This would never work, but it would be nice to have a warm fireplace for people who ski and are cold from being outside rather than for people who don't ski and read their emails.  

Squaw and Alpine Meadows both have fireplaces. Good luck getting a spot near one on a busy day. 

We were at JH--the cafeteria at the top of the gondola was a zoo. We ate at the Snake River Lodge Bar. A little more expensive, much better food, much more peaceful, and convenient to the tram.

I used to take a sandwich and eat in the car on nice weekend days. Now I don't ski weekends unless it's special. 

post #27 of 56

Some of the NE resorts do not allow gear bags on the table and post the policy somewhere. They have a check bag section or have enough cubby holes for storage. IIRC all the NE Peak Resorts ski areas I've been to have this policy. I remember when they started this in Sunapee and Mt Snow, the resort would collect un-attended bags left on the table and chairs and put them in somewhere in the lodge's basement. I would hate to be the attendant for these bags at the end of the day when irate and tire skiers/riders were searching for their stuff.  

post #28 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post
 

I carry a small flask filled with Peppermint Schnapps, and add it to my ridiculously expensive hot chocolate to turn it into a Snow Bunny. Despite the rules, is this OK and offset by the cost of my small fortune season pass?

I always knew that drink as a Girl Scout Cookie.

 

I find that the "reserved" table thing happens more at smaller, regional areas and not major resorts.  For instance the lodge at Berkshire East one Saturday.  Short lift line, could hardly find a place to sit inside due to the non skiing parents claiming table space.

 

Never seen crockpots plugged in.  I did see a family making fondue at Le Massif.

post #29 of 56

Why, oh why has nearly every ski area removed the hooks, pegs, and other convenient items for hanging your coat, jacket, goggles, helmet and other stuff?  It used to be that every wall, post, corner would have some way to hang your gear.  Now they are all gone.  This contributes to the tables full of gear while people eat in the lodge.

 

Ski Areas:   Please install hooks, hangers, pegs and other means to hang gear while eating in the lodge.

post #30 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jack97 View Post
 

Some of the NE resorts do not allow gear bags on the table and post the policy somewhere. They have a check bag section or have enough cubby holes for storage. IIRC all the NE Peak Resorts ski areas I've been to have this policy. I remember when they started this in Sunapee and Mt Snow, the resort would collect un-attended bags left on the table and chairs and put them in somewhere in the lodge's basement. I would hate to be the attendant for these bags at the end of the day when irate and tire skiers/riders were searching for their stuff.  


Sunapee isn't a Peak resort, but they do this, as you say — so does Okemo, of course (being under the same ownership — what about Crested Butte?). The policy is posted everywhere — right on the tables at Sunapee and Okemo. At Crotched (a Peak Resort), it's posted on large signs. Generally, it works.

 

Neither care about bag lunches. I'm not a fan of resorts that do (though I eat resort chili all the time). Skiing shouldn't be just for people with money.

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