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Who to contact at Powdr about Killington problem

post #1 of 52
Thread Starter 

Hi all - Have an unresolved problem concerning slope management at Killington. Various people there have either been defensive or unresponsive. Can anyone recommend a person at Powdr who might care about same, or is this a fool's errand, even for long-time season pass holders? Thanks. 

post #2 of 52

There is always the GM of any resort.  I know my local hill GM would be receptive of any comment.

 

The topic of "slope management" sounds rather subjective.  Don't get your expectations up.

post #3 of 52

The important question is: Who at Powdr enjoys reading novellas? I mean really, REALLY enjoys reading novellas.

 

 

(just kidding Beyond, I hope you get through to someone.)

post #4 of 52
msolimano@killington.com

When I have emailed him directly he actually did reply himself.
post #5 of 52
Thread Starter 
Hey, I like my novellas. 😄 Have worked our way up through various managers in various Killington compartments. Will try GM, OK. Don't hold out much hope.

(Novella alert) Not very subjective; Son flattened by middle aged snowboarder using GoPro on a pole to watch himself. So help me god. Guy then checked to make sure his GoPro was OK n left while my son was still on ground. Violation of VT state law. Guy's son, also a boarder who was far back, then cursed out my son n wife as he went past. So I stayed with my son and my wife gave chase. She's a lot better skier than this guy is a boarder, caught up n yelled at him whole way down; he crashed twice trying to get away from her.

So (page two of novella) when they got to gondola, she told attendants what happened, asked them to detain him until she could exchange names n # with him (that law again), or at least scan his ticket so they could trace him. Took a bunch of pics of him, which he tried to wave off. Attendant, first day kid, shrugged it off, let this guy on. Said he couldn't do anything.

Later my wife spotted guy near customer service in lodge, again started asking them to at least call a patrolman. They also shrugged it off. Eventually a patrolman showed up, too late to even find the guy, and like everyone else treated my wife and I (I had accompanied my son down to clinic, found her when this guy was still around) like we were the problem. Patrolman made a casually racist remark over the phone about my wife.

My son was woozy for a while, was on concussion protocol, but should be OK.

Subsequent conversations with various management types have basically focused on how they don't have any responsibility for anything that happens on their slopes, they do not pull passes (I can attest to that, last season a boarder crashed into the L3 we were taking a lesson from, so hard she could barely finish skiing down, and she said the same thing), and that only the police can detain someone or request information. When we noted this guy broke at least one law, they shrugged again. Oh yeah, and more casual racism.

Funny thing is we have a small business, kept trying to appeal to Killington's profit motives, explain to middle managers how to treat long term customers, how to deal with problems or defuse disagreements. Nada. Zilch. Just boilerplate defensiveness.

All we want at this point is a refund on our season passes. Done with K-ton.
post #6 of 52

Sounds like a legitimate complaint. Sounds like aiding and abetting the escape of a criminal. Probably worth filing a police report against the boarder who left the scene of an accident, with the details about Killington's response and the names of the people who you spoke to at Killington on the day of the incident. Good luck. (Around here--Northstar not only pulls passes but has a sign showing the number of passes that have been pulled so far each season. Also the only place I have ever been told to slow down.)

post #7 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

All we want at this point is a refund on our season passes. Done with K-ton.

 

Time to trade up to Stowe. 

 

We all do training on conflict resolution at Stowe, and we are all empowered to take care of issues within our purview, or are encouraged to take the issue to someone with the ability to take care of it. The fact that nobody did a thing to help you out is mind boggling. 

post #8 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralVT08 View Post

msolimano@killington.com

When I have emailed him directly he actually did reply himself.

Yep.  Contact Mike.

post #9 of 52
You would like to believe skiers and boarders would have regard for one another and when a crash occurs take responsibility for their actions. Obviously this code of conduct isn't universal . Pretty depressing when it's revealed how badly people act and the disregard they have for anybody else and their well being.

When there is no regard for anybody but yourself and no consequences for your actions , people behave very poorly. Something is lacking and missing with a lot of people regarding respect and concern for other people. It's sad and I would like to think people that ski and board would be above that.

I know a couple of policeman at the gym I go to, and they have indicated that they deal with the same bad actors over and over again . These "criminals" keep doing the same crimes over and over again because they rarely go to jail for any period of time if at all. Again there are consequences for their actions.

I don't know, old fashioned respect for somebody else and their well being is not the new norm.
post #10 of 52
Best of luck on your endeavor. Here they'd definitely listen, the CEO is out there all the time skiing and listening.
post #11 of 52

Did you at least find out what part of NY the boarder was from?     

 

(Sorry - couldn't resist.  I'm a Boston guy and a skier. . . )

post #12 of 52

I hate to say it, but stories like beyond's are why I seldom ski K-mart.  My ex was cut off by a guy who was extremely rude when I asked him to be more cautious.  A co worker had her arm broken by a skier who slammed into her (she was standing still).

 

All these incidents happened over 15 years ago but it seems the character of the characters is still the same at K.

 

Re handling this on mountain:  The lifty should have loaded the perpetrator on the lift and then called the chair # into ski patrol who could have met him at the top and demanded his information in case there were any serious consequences ( concussion).

post #13 of 52

Beyond it sounds like your incident is worth at least as much as that woman who was stuck on the Gondola. Do you think you might have any PTSD?

post #14 of 52

Beyond, sorry to hear about this. VERY disappointed to hear about K-ton's reaction. Not responsible for what happens on our mountain???? Are you kidding me? Is this the attitude of all Pwdr resorts? Serious question, because this is the type of company that I choose to NOT do business with.

post #15 of 52
Thats the Killington I remember from childhood. Brawling on snow with Nyak ers
post #16 of 52

January is National Safety Awareness Month at Killington 

 

Along with National Ski Areas Association, Killington Resort will be educating skiers and riders about slope safety awareness throughout the month of January by promoting Your Responsibility Code and Smart Style, plus offering special promotions and interactive displays to raise awareness. From Jan. 14-27, purchase a helmet at any Killington Sports location or online at killingtonsports.com and you’ll receive a voucher for a free lift ticket, valid any day starting Jan. 28, 2017 through the end of the 2016-17 season. Look for the interactive display in Ramshead Base Lodge Saturdays and Sundays from Jan. 7-29, plus Monday, Jan. 16. Here, kids can talk with Mountain Ambassadors, color safety themed posters covering the seven points of Your Responsibility Code, and get their picture taken with Know the Code! Plus, take a safety awareness quiz, decorate a helmet cover and maybe walk away with some fun prizes. An assortment of safety awareness flyers, cards and stickers will be available throughout the resort. At the Creation Station, kids can enter a raffle to win a free snow sports helmet and other prizes. Raffle will take place Saturdays and Sundays, Jan. 7-29, plus Jan. 16. Out on the hill, ambassadors, patrollers and instructors will be handing out Know the Code stickers and cards, Smart Style stickers and a Freestyle Terrain User’s Guide to guests. Plus, some Ambassadors will wear bright yellow jackets that display important safety awareness messages based on Your Responsibility Code and give away prizes to guests who successfully answer a safety awareness quiz. Stay safe while enjoying the sport you love. For more info, visit killington.com. -

 

http://mountaintimes.info/january-national-safety-awareness/#sthash.U1pB2d0P.dpuf

post #17 of 52

Speaking of Killington -

Two men died while skiing at Killington in less than a week back in December. One skier collapsed while skiing down Header trail while the other was found collapsed on an intermediate trail.

Extremely sad news.

 

post #18 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by naja View Post
 

Speaking of Killington -

Two men died while skiing at Killington in less than a week back in December. One skier collapsed while skiing down Header trail while the other was found collapsed on an intermediate trail.

Extremely sad news.

 

 

Both natural causes.  Not accidents.

post #19 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimH View Post
 

 

Both natural causes.  Not accidents.

 

That is what it seems like.

 

Also - Vermont State Police are investigating the death of a ski resort employee at Killington. State Police say 53-year-old Jeffrey Chalk fell about thirteen feet from a catwalk to the cement floor in the Skyeship Gondola's North Brook Terminal Saturday.

 

That would be three deaths in almost as many weeks. Extremely sad.

post #20 of 52

I have found Mike Solimano (Killington President) and his senior staff to be nothing but thoroughly professional and customer centered.  I will be very surprised if he would not want to be made aware of this and and sure he would investigate.

 

Hit and runs are a problem at all ski areas.  My wife was hit a number of years ago at Solitude Utah by a snowboarder.  He asked if she was hurt, she said yes (had broken collar bone), and he then took off. Here's a recent incident at Keystone CO.

http://www.denverpost.com/2017/01/04/snowboarder-hit-and-run-crash-keystone/

post #21 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimH View Post
 

I have found Mike Solimano (Killington President) and his senior staff to be nothing but thoroughly professional and customer centered.  I will be very surprised if he would not want to be made aware of this and and sure he would investigate.

 

 

Hopefully, Beyond will tell us if this is true or not. In any case, the damage has been done, and nothing Mr Solimano can do will change the fact that his staff let someone get away with hit and run skiing. Note that the Vermont Skier Safety Act specifically relieves the resort of any responsibility to enforce the duty of a skier involved in an injury collision to identify themselves. The burden is only on the injuring skier. Which doesn't make Killington's actions right, just legal. Of course, without the willingness of patrol and management to identify reluctant injuring skiers, the prohibition on hit and run skiing is meaningless.

post #22 of 52

I don't like seeing race cards get played. I've been to a lot of ski areas and worked in the snow industry with a lot of different colored people and never saw a bit of racism.  This may be about shitty service and handling a complaint wrong but I don't think it was about anyone's race. People get hit all the time by other riders.  It sucks your son got hit and it sucks the guy who did it was a douche about it but sh*t happens.  Skiing is dangerous af. 

post #23 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post

I don't like seeing race cards get played. I've been to a lot of ski areas and worked in the snow industry with a lot of different colored people and never saw a bit of racism.  This may be about shitty service and handling a complaint wrong but I don't think it was about anyone's race. People get hit all the time by other riders.  It sucks your son got hit and it sucks the guy who did it was a douche about it but sh*t happens.  Skiing is dangerous af. 

rolleyes.gif


Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Patrolman made a casually racist remark over the phone about my wife.
post #24 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post
 

I don't like seeing race cards get played. I've been to a lot of ski areas and worked in the snow industry with a lot of different colored people and never saw a bit of racism.  This may be about shitty service and handling a complaint wrong but I don't think it was about anyone's race. People get hit all the time by other riders.  It sucks your son got hit and it sucks the guy who did it was a douche about it but sh*t happens.  Skiing is dangerous af. 

How can you possibly say it wasn't a racist remark when you don't know what was said?  And Beyond never said the whole incident was about race, only that a racist remark was made.

Sure people get hit--but fleeing the scene of a crash after you've hit someone is a crime in Vermont and most other skiing states. 

And this isn't about shitty service and handling a complaint wrong; it's about refusing to help identify someone who injured someone else and fled the scene. Killington may not have had a legal duty to help but they certainly had a moral duty. 

You sound like you would fit right in at Killington.

post #25 of 52

Here in Canada, any citizen can make an arrest, though it might be ill-advised as it opens you up to a lot of law suits.

post #26 of 52
Quote:


 

Speaking of Killington -

Two men died while skiing at Killington in less than a week back in December. One skier collapsed while skiing down Header trail while the other was found collapsed on an intermediate trail.

Extremely sad news.

 

It is sad news but it doesn't sound like it was Killington's fault.


Edited by Paul Jones - Yesterday at 6:11 am
post #27 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whitey View Post
 

Did you at least find out what part of NY the boarder was from?     

 

(Sorry - couldn't resist.  I'm a Boston guy and a skier. . . )

 

New York is a big state. I know there are problems down state at Hunter, but Mass skiers have their own reputation... MassHole, It's not fair to paint with a broad brush!

post #28 of 52


There are plenty of snow boarders out there who are people with class and respect. But, many newcomers are taking up snowboarding. They can make it to the top of the mountain with very little experience. They also know little about the Code and have little interest in it. Poor skills, too much speed and little concern for others... not good.

post #29 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
 

 

New York is a big state. I know there are problems down state at Hunter, but Mass skiers have their own reputation... MassHole, It's not fair to paint with a broad brush!

 

I agree with you, Paul Jones, that vast generalizations like that are unhelpful.  But I'll add that as someone who skis both in the Poconos and at smaller, local resorts in New England (Ragged, Suicide Six, etc.) I've noticed that there is an interesting sort of cultural difference in the two regions.  It's not that people from NY or NJ are jerks (or on the whole "jerkier" than people from other regions), but there is a culture in metro-NY adjacent skiing that promotes a few assumptions.  For example:

 

a. Trails are very, very crowded in the Poconos, so there's a kind of acceptance /expectation of skiing very close to others.   As a result, there are a lot of crashes.

 

b. This is exacerbated by a culture that celebrates "bombing" down runs as fast as possible without falling.  This is widely considered "good" skiing/boarding. When you combine that with a high tolerance for close proximity, ...well.

 

and c. There's not a big culture in northeast PA of really learning good, skilled skiing from a young age, so there's little to effectively counter the dominant norms created by newcomers to the sport who enter into a ski culture that diminishes the importance of lessons and of building skill on easier slopes. Turning, in other words, it not seen as the point of skiing.  Getting on hard slopes quickly, and then going really fast is seen as the point. If you don't know any better, you'd have a hard time escaping this paradigm. I think a lot of people assume that skiing is no different from ice skating in that respect: you rent the skates and have fun for a few hours; it's not seen as something that's supposed to take work or instruction to enjoy.

 

When people take these cultural norms to New England, I can see why there's conflict.  

 

I'm not saying that any of this is universal obviously; there are phenomenal skiers in the Poconos, and a lot of race leagues for kids that develop skill. (And there are out of control meat-torpedoes in New England, too). And I'm not saying I've definitively explained the culture here. I'm just a curious observer who likes to ski a lot, wherever I can, and I've noticed some regional differences that I find interesting enough to think about. 

 

Also I'm proctoring a midterm exam right now and am very, very bored.  :-)

post #30 of 52


And yet, I ski at Jiminy Peak and find the down state crowd to be more than reasonable in their behavior. They are from the city and near by. Certain groups from that area are in fact rude. We get a ton of visitors (and money) from down state skiers.

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