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Are we more likely to be impaled by our own Pole if we use the strap or less likely

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 

I don't know the key words to use to find this discussion.

post #2 of 47
Getting impaled by a ski pole is kind of like touching your ear with your elbow... things have to go REALLY wrong for it to happen. Don't worry about it.
post #3 of 47

I'm sure disasterskier could find a way to do it.

post #4 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Getting impaled by a ski pole is kind of like touching your ear with your elbow... things have to go REALLY wrong for it to happen. Don't worry about it.


I think if I broke my arm and in half and it bounced up it could touch my elbow.  See my next post to see the second possibility

post #5 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post
 

I'm sure disasterskier could find a way to do it.


What if I fell and broke the pole in half and then it impaled me.  What if it caught me in the ear lobe and in an effort to obtain a body modification I kept the piercing, we left part of it in there including the pole basket.  I bet I could get a bunch of cuties with that piercing.

post #6 of 47

Don't worry about it, seriously. There are other pros and cons though. Using straps can impair your ability to self rescue in an avalanche or tree well burial and can cause arm and shoulder injuries in the trees. Not having straps on makes it easier to self arrest, but only if you practice it, and it can also be done with the straps on. It is easier to skate or climb with the straps on. If you fall your poles will stay with you if the straps are on. I've had two significant falls this year with straps off. One was a slip on steep ice with a moderately long headfirst slide on my back. My poles stayed in my hands. The other was catching a tip on a tree--a tiny one that was barely sticking out--I let go of both poles. And if your straps are on you won't leave a pole behind when a snow snake, or sticky snow, grabs a pole, forcing you to go back up to get it.

post #7 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Don't worry about it, seriously. There are other pros and cons though. Using straps can impair your ability to self rescue in an avalanche or tree well burial and can cause arm and shoulder injuries in the trees. Not having straps on makes it easier to self arrest, but only if you practice it, and it can also be done with the straps on. It is easier to skate or climb with the straps on. If you fall your poles will stay with you if the straps are on. I've had two significant falls this year with straps off. One was a slip on steep ice with a moderately long headfirst slide on my back. My poles stayed in my hands. The other was catching a tip on a tree--a tiny one that was barely sticking out--I let go of both poles. And if your straps are on you won't leave a pole behind when a snow snake, or sticky snow, grabs a pole, forcing you to go back up to get it.

Thank you for that.  That sounds good.  They were asking at one point if anyone can rock moguls at speed backwards.  I actually can but in order to do it I have to be head first and on my back.  Then with one hand down I make it look easy which is the hallmark of someone who has perfected it.  However it is an art where perfection is achieved accidentally first time around. Rock on OG !

post #8 of 47

I don't know.  Drink like you boast you do, go out on terrain that you like to post pictures of, and try it both ways and tell us what happens.  You're in need of a new story to tell anyways. ;)

post #9 of 47

You forgot to mention the speed factor when going strapless...

 

If it takes 3-5 seconds to put your straps on when exiting a chairlift and multiply that by several thousand runs over a season, think of all the time you're waiting putting on straps.  :eek

 

Personally, I only wear straps when I'm skiing somewhere the snow is steep and slick and I, um, REALLY want to have at least one pole to help try to arrest if I need it.  

 

Back to the op's question, however.  It is possible to impale yourself but I'm not sure it's any more likely strapped or strapless.  A sobering report:

 

Skier dies in freak Wyoming accident 

  • By the AP - 12/08/01
  •  
  • Dec 8, 2001
 
  • JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — An experienced skier and mountaineer was killed in a freak backcountry accident.

Jeff Douthitt, 28, of Jackson, died while skiing on Teton Pass when he apparently struck some hidden ski tracks and fell. One of his poles broke and he landed on it, severing his femoral artery, authorities said.

Douthitt fell Tuesday morning while skiing with two friends. They had gone ahead of him and were waiting about 400 yards below on the side of Wyoming 22 when they heard him shout.

 

When his friends and two other skiers reached him about 12 minutes later, he was not breathing. The group began administering CPR, as did rescue volunteers after he was pulled from the slope, but he never regained consciousness.Douthitt probably lost too much blood before help arrived, Teton County Coroner Bob Campbell said.

Teton County search and rescue coordinator Doug Meyer said nothing indicated he was skiing out of control.

post #10 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Don't worry about it, seriously. There are other pros and cons though. Using straps can impair your ability to self rescue in an avalanche or tree well burial and can cause arm and shoulder injuries in the trees. Not having straps on makes it easier to self arrest, but only if you practice it, and it can also be done with the straps on. It is easier to skate or climb with the straps on. If you fall your poles will stay with you if the straps are on. I've had two significant falls this year with straps off. One was a slip on steep ice with a moderately long headfirst slide on my back. My poles stayed in my hands. The other was catching a tip on a tree--a tiny one that was barely sticking out--I let go of both poles. And if your straps are on you won't leave a pole behind when a snow snake, or sticky snow, grabs a pole, forcing you to go back up to get it.


Again the steep ice.  Always my most curious environment.  When Goat talks about steep ice it gets me upset because I know its a serious issue if he complains.  Although I am curious about Steep Ice he is complaining and having fun in steeper ice than I am describing.  I have always been a fan of his since he told me about his cold night stuck on Mt Washington 60 MPH in winter.  At some point I want to take steeper Icers.  Rock on all of us interested in steep Ice.  This is my most obsessive topic.  I have a new post now

post #11 of 47

If skiing out of bounds or side country in powder I don't ski with pole straps. Need to have ability to extricate out of bad situations if you take a header into a tree well or deep wind drift.

post #12 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bamaman View Post
 

I don't know.  Drink like you boast you do, go out on terrain that you like to post pictures of, and try it both ways and tell us what happens.  You're in need of a new story to tell anyways. ;)


I'm a pathetic man who boasts of nothing worth knowing or hearing.  I just work seriously to improve my Skiing and love cool stories.  And yes I love my drink.  Tune in if you are strong at heart.  Tune in to  hear of a tragedy.  Its beautiful but not pretty.  I will rock on 'til Im 100.

post #13 of 47

I severed the tendon on my index finger while skiing moguls without gloves, so anything can happen.

 

Wiped on powder over rocks the other week and while not using straps held on to my poles to the point of having a small bruise on my breastbone from the handle of the pole.

 

Rock on disaster.

post #14 of 47

I have a friend who impaled himself in the side with his pole while racing. Directly to the side of the abdomen, up to the basket. He had to be airlifted from the mountain to the closest Level I trauma center. I'm going to assume that since he was on a race course, he was wearing his straps. 

post #15 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post

Thank you for that.  That sounds good.  They were asking at one point if anyone can rock moguls at speed backwards.  I actually can but in order to do it I have to be head first and on my back.  Then with one hand down I make it look easy which is the hallmark of someone who has perfected it.  However it is an art where perfection is achieved accidentally first time around. Rock on OG !

Now that's funny, but only because I've done it myself as well!
post #16 of 47

I'm more concerned with getting impaled by some gaper in the gondola maze. 

Lot's of people hold their poles mid shaft, horizontal to the ground and swing their arms when they walk.

When they go up the stairs,  their pole tips become eye level of the people behind them.

 

Don't flail around and keep your pole tips down!

post #17 of 47

I'd be more concerned about pole impalement if I was rocking bamboo poles and wire baskets.  Those puppies shatter with all kinds of sharp ends.  The full loop wire baskets of the past were bad for hooking tree limbs.  I snagged one basket on a fallen log jump at Bogus Basin that just about dislocated my arm (yes, I was wearing the strap).

 

I've bent aluminum poles but never broken one off to where there was a sharp point.  How do carbon poles break?

 

I'm far more concerned with impalement by tree limbs sticking out than by my own poles.  I just about stuck myself to a tree at Pebble Creek a few years ago.  Not even a big tree, just a point at the right height that I fell backwards into.  Got a nasty scrape & bruise without breaking through my jacket.  

post #18 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post
 

I'd be more concerned about pole impalement if I was rocking bamboo poles and wire baskets.  Those puppies shatter with all kinds of sharp ends.  The full loop wire baskets of the past were bad for hooking tree limbs.  I snagged one basket on a fallen log jump at Bogus Basin that just about dislocated my arm (yes, I was wearing the strap).

 

I've bent aluminum poles but never broken one off to where there was a sharp point.  How do carbon poles break?

 

I'm far more concerned with impalement by tree limbs sticking out than by my own poles.  I just about stuck myself to a tree at Pebble Creek a few years ago.  Not even a big tree, just a point at the right height that I fell backwards into.  Got a nasty scrape & bruise without breaking through my jacket.  

 

They break a lot like a bamboo pole, I think.  They splinter and have very sharp edges.  The poles involved in the fatality above were carbon.

post #19 of 47

I suppose there may be something to the logic that strapped on poles may increase the danger. But I would think if no one strapped we would then have poles laying around in far too many places therefore resulting in many more injuries. I mean people lose enough poles here and there even with the straps and I suppose many are from people who don't strap too. But I can certainly picture a crowded slope with poles lying just about anywhere if no one used straps. So I think strapping (although may increase some risk of impairment) would be the lessor of two evils in terms of amount of injuries due to too many littered poles here and there around the slopes if no one strapped.

post #20 of 47

I had to quit using poles as they kept getting in the way when I needed to pull my chute.  I'm not sure of the purpose of poles anyway besides pole guitar.  

post #21 of 47

Are we more likely to be impaled by our own Pole if we use the strap or less likely

 

Is your eastern European partner into kinky stuff? Then yes.

 

:eek

post #22 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter5 View Post
 

I severed the tendon on my index finger while skiing moguls without gloves, so anything can happen.

 

Wiped on powder over rocks the other week and while not using straps held on to my poles to the point of having a small bruise on my breastbone from the handle of the pole.

 

Rock on disaster.

Two years ago I think I had a partially cracked sternum so I'm glad you didn't have to deal with that.

 

Yes I will try to Rock On but I have two weeks till the Bird.

I don't know what to expect but my one-on-one instructor is taking me places up there I haven't been yet.  Also I may or may not have a guide lined up who Skis there every week so I won't get lost with him either.

This persons in the thick of it.

post #23 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bamaman View Post
 

I don't know.  Drink like you boast you do, go out on terrain that you like to post pictures of, and try it both ways and tell us what happens.  You're in need of a new story to tell anyways. ;)


I am trying to drink less actually.  I am actually worried about my health.

Yes I need a new story to tell.  I will try for something hearing at least for 3 sentences.  I may have a crash story or a self deprecating story or less likely something I did cool.

I will have the Instructor take some photos.  and maybe short video so people can point out errors.

post #24 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Varmintmist View Post
 

Are we more likely to be impaled by our own Pole if we use the strap or less likely

 

Is your eastern European partner into kinky stuff? Then yes.

 

:eek


Oh I have no woman and I don't like kinky and all that.  I like hot and heavily educated.

Actually I just caught the nuance of that joke.  Yes my wording could be misinterpreted.

post #25 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rollin View Post
 

I suppose there may be something to the logic that strapped on poles may increase the danger. But I would think if no one strapped we would then have poles laying around in far too many places therefore resulting in many more injuries. I mean people lose enough poles here and there even with the straps and I suppose many are from people who don't strap too. But I can certainly picture a crowded slope with poles lying just about anywhere if no one used straps. So I think strapping (although may increase some risk of impairment) would be the lessor of two evils in terms of amount of injuries due to too many littered poles here and there around the slopes if no one strapped.


Yes crowded like the Cat Track at Snowshoe called Hootenanny at Snowshoe.lum

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
 

You forgot to mention the speed factor when going strapless...

 

If it takes 3-5 seconds to put your straps on when exiting a chairlift and multiply that by several thousand runs over a season, think of all the time you're waiting putting on straps.  :eek

 

Personally, I only wear straps when I'm skiing somewhere the snow is steep and slick and I, um, REALLY want to have at least one pole to help try to arrest if I need it.  

 

Back to the op's question, however.  It is possible to impale yourself but I'm not sure it's any more likely strapped or strapless.  A sobering report:

 

Skier dies in freak Wyoming accident 

  • By the AP - 12/08/01
  •  
  • Dec 8, 2001
 
  • JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — An experienced skier and mountaineer was killed in a freak backcountry accident.

Jeff Douthitt, 28, of Jackson, died while skiing on Teton Pass when he apparently struck some hidden ski tracks and fell. One of his poles broke and he landed on it, severing his femoral artery, authorities said.

Douthitt fell Tuesday morning while skiing with two friends. They had gone ahead of him and were waiting about 400 yards below on the side of Wyoming 22 when they heard him shout.

 

When his friends and two other skiers reached him about 12 minutes later, he was not breathing. The group began administering CPR, as did rescue volunteers after he was pulled from the slope, but he never regained consciousness.Douthitt probably lost too much blood before help arrived, Teton County Coroner Bob Campbell said.

Teton County search and rescue coordinator Doug Meyer said nothing indicated he was skiing out of control.

Thank you.

post #26 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rollin View Post
 

I suppose there may be something to the logic that strapped on poles may increase the danger. But I would think if no one strapped we would then have poles laying around in far too many places therefore resulting in many more injuries. I mean people lose enough poles here and there even with the straps and I suppose many are from people who don't strap too. But I can certainly picture a crowded slope with poles lying just about anywhere if no one used straps. So I think strapping (although may increase some risk of impairment) would be the lessor of two evils in terms of amount of injuries due to too many littered poles here and there around the slopes if no one strapped.


Yeah watch this crowded slope

 

post #27 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
 

 

They break a lot like a bamboo pole, I think.  They splinter and have very sharp edges.  The poles involved in the fatality above were carbon.


Great point, Rob.  I have the K2 Four Speed so I maybe be one of the ones.

post #28 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post
 

I'd be more concerned about pole impalement if I was rocking bamboo poles and wire baskets.  Those puppies shatter with all kinds of sharp ends.  The full loop wire baskets of the past were bad for hooking tree limbs.  I snagged one basket on a fallen log jump at Bogus Basin that just about dislocated my arm (yes, I was wearing the strap).

 

I've bent aluminum poles but never broken one off to where there was a sharp point.  How do carbon poles break?

 

I'm far more concerned with impalement by tree limbs sticking out than by my own poles.  I just about stuck myself to a tree at Pebble Creek a few years ago.  Not even a big tree, just a point at the right height that I fell backwards into.  Got a nasty scrape & bruise without breaking through my jacket.  


Great point about the sharp broken tree branches.  At my old house, there was a small pine forest.  I used to stumble around there in the darkness with a light to gather firewood and there were spikes from fallen trunks everywhere.

post #29 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

I have a friend who impaled himself in the side with his pole while racing. Directly to the side of the abdomen, up to the basket. He had to be airlifted from the mountain to the closest Level I trauma center. I'm going to assume that since he was on a race course, he was wearing his straps. 


Is it possible the basket end jabs in the snow and the top of the pole cuts through the handle and then into the body?  Thank you

post #30 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post


Now that's funny, but only because I've done it myself as well!


I hate it when things get like that.  I feel a slip, backseat then seals the deal.  I've learned to control it more now and keep grinding on the tops of the bumps in flatter diagonal traverses.

I wouldn't care so much about moguls if it weren't for the fact that I may get to a position sometime here I have to get through I need that skill.  I always try to come up with tricks and ways around what the Us Ski Association recommends and I always end up having to acquiesce and do it their way.

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