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Any chance of repair?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I haven't used these skis for quite a few years. They seemed to be in good condition when I stored them, but now a gap has opened up...



The gap runs pretty much the whole length of both sides and there is grey powder coming out. I guess this is some sort of water damage. I'm not really prepared to pay a lot of money to get the repaired - is it worth attempting to glue and clamp them myself?
post #2 of 15
Another opportunity for shameless self promotion

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAMWdapRekM
post #3 of 15

If the delam runs the whole length of both sides it's undoubtedly delammed in the middle, in other words the whole ski is delaminated. I'd say your chances of successfully fixing that are extremely small, but then I've never tried.

post #4 of 15

Throw them away.  They are done.  Gone through the goal post of life.

post #5 of 15

Personally, I wouldn't try to fix myself.  I don't really have experience with ski building, and the way I ski I wouldn't put my faith in a ski I may or may not have fixed properly.  Not sure where you are located, but I'm in ski country and was able to find a local ski builder I trusted.  He does all the work on my skis and I get to be free of worry over whether the work was done right.  If it's not repairable he'd know, and won't beat around the bush.  I also know that if anything else is wrong, he'll find it and discuss my options.  So I guess my advice would be that if you lack experience or know-how to repair them yourself, see if you can find a ski builder who seems trustworthy and start fostering a relationship :)

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by katy198

 I'm not really prepared to pay a lot of money to get the repaired
Quote:
Originally Posted by gobbly View Post
 

  So I guess my advice would be that if you lack experience or know-how to repair them yourself, see if you can find a ski builder who seems trustworthy and start fostering a relationship :)

I don't see this relationship working out...

 

 

(also the skis are not repairable. The 'grey powder' is oxidized metal, most likely the edge retaining tabs.)

post #7 of 15
This is an easy repair. I've done many way worse. At the shop I'd charge $20 for the repair, plus a tuneup with stone grind.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post

This is an easy repair. I've done many way worse. At the shop I'd charge $20 for the repair, plus a tuneup with stone grind.


Ha ha ha!  Just replace a few words in this one.

post #9 of 15
I would say this is more accurate

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1En6FKd5Pk
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post

I would say this is more accurate

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1En6FKd5Pk


Ha ha.  If anybody could fix it.........it would be you!

post #11 of 15

Duct tape.

post #12 of 15

I approve of oldgoat's suggestion! ( old pair of park skis - yeah they get some funny looks and comments on the chair, but make great rock skis)

 

before shot

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackke17 View Post
 

I approve of oldgoat's suggestion! ( old pair of park skis - yeah they get some funny looks and comments on the chair, but make great rock skis)

 

before shot

This is why it's important to have a bunch of duct tape wrapped around your ski pole--for on the spot delam repairs, also to seal leaky Langes.  (Frankly the old trick of carrying some duct tape wrapped around a ski pole never made sense to me--by the time you get around to using that tape that's been stuck and unstuck a couple of times and has been wrapped around your pole for 12 years it probably won't stick to anything--that is if you can get it unwrapped in the first place. What's wrong with throwing the ductape in your pack. The only reason to wrap duct tape around your ski pole is to make people think you're a Boy Scout--always prepared. And if anyone can think of a less important subject to rant about I'd like to hear it.)

post #14 of 15

^ First problem is that's a Coors Light back there.  That is saying a lot.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 

^ First problem is that's a Coors Light back there.  That is saying a lot.


most all Utah beer is 3.2 and tastes like water anyway~!

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