or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Tips for moving to a ski "town" for 2-3 months?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tips for moving to a ski "town" for 2-3 months?

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 

I've never lived near a large western ski resort in my lifetime and the opportunity for me to do so might be here since I have a flexible job that allows for working 100% remotely.  This idea is still just a concept in my head, but I think it's something I should really consider.  Spending thousands of dollars each winter for only 1-2 weeks of skiing is something I've grown accustomed to out of necessity, but at least once I'd like to really enjoy a lengthy ski season while my health, career and finances allow it.  I'm not looking to make a permanent move, but instead am considering a temporary move to an area with a few resorts for 2-3 months, possibly for the 2018 season.  It's worth noting that I'm not looking to be a "ski bum" living in a truck in the parking lot for pennies a day, I'll pay for a comfortable home/apartment for a short time.  Since I'll need to buy gear and ski passes, I'd start planning early to capitalize on off season and early season pricing.  Has anyone on the forum done something similar and can you share your experience and any advice?

 

There are obviously lots of questions, the big questions that immediately come to mind are below.  I don't expect anyone to have specific answers to these questions, I'm just looking for some general advice as I start to think if I can make this a reality for next year.

 

- Location.  SLC is at the top of my list due to proximity of many ski areas and my love for Alta/Snowbird.  CO and Tahoe are on my radar for variety.  I love the idea of Denver but it's a good drive to many resorts and the weekend commuting on I-70 is not fun.  I am used to and probably prefer city life but a short time in a "ski town" (e.g. Jackson, Telluride, Aspen) might also be a great experience and a better opportunity to build some more meaningful relationships than cities sometimes present.  Total cost will definitely be a big factor in any location decision.

- Housing.  Are there options for a short-term lease that isn't crazy expensive?  Renting a place month to month seems like the easiest answer, assuming there is availability.  Extended stay hotels might work but I expect that costs more.  What can I do with my home (I own) during the time I'm gone?  I can afford to leave it vacant while still paying some rent elsewhere, but that seems like a lost opportunity.  However finding a tenant for the same 2-3 month period might be a challenge.  I've read a little about home swapping so this might be something I'd consider.  I would prefer to live alone unless I can find a friend to join me on this adventure.  Having unknown roommates is not my ideal choice unless costs require me to go that route.  Good wifi will be a mandatory since I work remotely.

- Furnishings.  I would not want to buy or move furniture for such a short term stay, so I'll highly prefer furnished apartments or extended stay hotels.

- Transportation.  How can I arrange for a car for just a few months at reasonable prices?  Are short-term 2-3 month leases a thing?  One option might be to drive my current car across the country but my car isn't a great choice for snowy mountain roads.  My car would work if it's not a daily driver and there is alternative transit to the resorts (Uber, shuttles, etc.).  Another option might be to target an area where I don't need a car and can rely on a combination of walking, public transit, Uber and ski resort shuttles.  I'd prefer to have my own vehicle but if it's only for a couple of months I could probably get by without if my housing location is walkable.

- Skiing.  If in an area like SLC, is there a cost-effective way to get a pass to several nearby resorts giving me some skiing options or is it better to get a pass at one and just buy occasional single day passes for other places?  The epic pass is great value but if I'm in SLC I'd prefer passes to the either the Sol-Bright or Alta-Bird over Park City if I elect to pick just one resort.  I'll need to buy at least one pair of skis and more ski clothing since I live in a warm climate, but gear costs shouldn't be too excessive and they are things I'll be able to use on future ski vacations.  I currently rent demos since it's easier than travelling with skis when only getting 4-8 days on the slopes per year, and it ensures I get the right ski for the conditions every time.

- Taxes.  I imagine there is a max number of days you can work in a state before you are responsible for paying taxes in that state.  This is something I must investigate further, but could have a significant impact on my finances since I currently work/live in an area without a state income tax.

post #2 of 32
post #3 of 32

Suggest you check out the threads under the tag links now under Topics Discussed (Desktop mode).

 

As for skiing around SLC, New2Utah moved to SLC and was there for a season or two.  Wrote up all the ski areas he explored before moving elsewhere.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/131595/finding-a-new-home-mountain-near-salt-lake-intermediate-trip-reports

post #4 of 32
Mods, can we add a "topic" called Ski Town Living? I never know how to tag this.
post #5 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Mods, can we add a "topic" called Ski Town Living? I never know how to tag this.


Good idea. Done.  :) 

post #6 of 32

All good advice above to check out some of those other forums/post on the topic

 

My advice, if you're moving to a "ski town" as you say, do it right man.  Salt Lake, Denver??? Those are just big cities with ski resorts close by.  If this isn't a permanent move, only a few months, move to somewhere like Crested Butte, Jackson, Tahoe, etc.

 

You only live once and may not get another opportunity to do something like this (different job, married, kids, etc) later in life, do it right

post #7 of 32

If you go to SLC, there are Gold and Silver Passes through skiutah.com that give you a certain number of days at each Utah resort. I believe quantities are limited and they sell out quick.

There is a studio 6 (larger room with a kitchenette) not too far off the bus route. Don't know if they offer monthly rates. Think there are similar possibilities in SLC.

 

Housing will be a problem for a 2-3 month stay. Perhaps consider someplace like Glenwood Springs and ride the bus or drive to Aspen.

 

I think as far as taxes go, if you earn it there, you pay it there. Also consider many ski towns have rather high sales taxes.

post #8 of 32

For the past few years, there were a limited number of Alta passes during pre-season that got perks for other SLC ski resorts.  Can't remember the details but I know included 2-3 days at Deer Valley.

 

The time to check for the best prices is in March or April.

post #9 of 32
I'm guessing you'll end up where you can find housing, so I wouldn't stress about which town is best--figure out where you can actually live. Many Airbnbs do monthly rentals. This likely won't be cheap and you'll have to arrange it long in advance, but I gotta think you can make this work somewhere.

I think a car lease would be hard to find. Drive out there, keep it parked when it's snowy and drive when you can.
post #10 of 32
When my wife and I lived in winter park for a winter, we bought two studded snow tires for our front wheel drive car. When we left, sold them back to the tire shop. That was cost effective and handled well.
post #11 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnewlin View Post

When my wife and I lived in winter park for a winter, we bought two studded snow tires for our front wheel drive car. When we left, sold them back to the tire shop. That was cost effective and handled well.


That's generally regarded as a bad idea. Glad it worked out for you.

post #12 of 32
The Spokane/CdA area is cheaper and with passports you have Red Mtn, Whitewater, Fernie & Kimberly. Locally Schweitzer, 49N, Silver & Lookout, 2-3 hrs Turner, Whitefish, Mission Ridge. Passes are cheaper than the big resorts for the most part, Schweitzer and Whitefish are higher in cost than our other ski hills.
post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gipaldo View Post
 

All good advice above to check out some of those other forums/post on the topic

 

My advice, if you're moving to a "ski town" as you say, do it right man.  Salt Lake, Denver??? Those are just big cities with ski resorts close by.  If this isn't a permanent move, only a few months, move to somewhere like Crested Butte, Jackson, Tahoe, etc.

 

You only live once and may not get another opportunity to do something like this (different job, married, kids, etc) later in life, do it right

 

I concur with this. Denver and SLC are not ski towns. They are cities with skiing relatively close. A ski town is a town where the majority of the view in town is occupied by the mountain. You have your whole life to live in cities. I grew up in a major metro area (Boston). I spent a few years living in a ski town (Ludlow, VT). Now I live in a town that's close to skiing (Burlington, VT). Burlington is great, I love it here, but it's not the same as a ski town. I would not give up my experience of actually living in a ski town for anything. If that's the case, your transportation needs are significantly less. Bring your car up, use the public transport to get to the mountain. No worries about renting or leasing or any of that silly stuff. 

 

I also agree that housing will be your number one obstacle, and should be your number one priority. One of the things that is going to make that difficult is the time frame you've stated. 2-3 months is an awkward amount of time. It's longer than your typical vacation rental, but not quite a full season, so not a seasonal rental. If you're married to that time frame, maybe get in touch with some of the rental agencies in these towns and see if there is anyone willing to split a season with you. You take half the season, they take the other half. On the other hand, is there any reason you're married to this 2-3 month time period? If you're going to do the ski town thing, and you're not limited by work, why not just do a full season? Then you're looking at ~5 months, and can just do a seasonal rental, of which there are many in most ski towns. They're not cheap, but they're there. 

post #14 of 32
Agree with suggestions to bring own car ($50 chains turn any car into a tank) and stay in the mtns rather than a city, but SLC is pretty feasible and close to great skiing. Some of your rooming options are: 1) rent your own cheap little condo for a few months. This is likely to cost you one to two thousand per month. 2) stay in a very cheap motel or hostel. You will be lucky to do this for about $50 per night = $1500 per month. 3) Find a room in a group house. Best chances are in largest ski towns, for example Summit County CO, South Lake Tahoe CA, or Park City UT. I skied six out of eight weeks in 2015 in the Vail/Summit County area in Colorado using a cheap motel in Minturn for two weeks and a nicer condo in Silverthorne for one month. Lots of reasonably priced beds in Summit County and free public bus to a bunch of ski areas on one ski pass. No tax there if you rent a condo for 30 days or more. Find online version of local newspaper and start tracking rooms for rent/share many months in advance of your dates, scour sites like VRBO and Airbnb for cheap condos. See this thread for a possibly good hostel: http://www.epicski.com/t/146828/the-bunkhouse-vails-first-and-only-boutique-hostel-opening-may-26th
post #15 of 32

CO and CA are paradise lost as far as actually living in the mountains.  Scratch doing anything even reasonably affordably off your list there.  NM may be an option but skiing could be hit or miss depending on the weather.  I can't speak for the PNW or UT. 

post #16 of 32
Many people in the Roaring Fork Valley rent rooms. Most of the rentals I see are on Facebook groups, i.e. Roaring Fork Rentals.

You could get a room in Basalt or Carbondale and take advantage of RFTA bus service to the Aspen area plus be close to Sunlight.
post #17 of 32

Remember that the OP said he has a flexible work situation - meaning that he has to work...from home...not a good situation for a crowded possibly noisy environment.

 

I'm going to guess that when you said SLC or Denver that you were thinking general area rather than literally. If you ARE thinking literally I'll echo others and say DO NOT miss out on the actual ski town experience. Change your thinking and find a real ski town. If you need to be near an airport Park City and Summit County CO are doable locations. There was a thread last year on this subject. Since you have to work I'd recommend a walk to the lifts location if you can. That is what I have in Breck. When I'm in Breck during the work week I can take a couple of hours to "go to the gym" in the morning when conditions dictate and still be close enough to the "office" that I don't negatively impact work. I could also live full time in Breck even considering travel. It is close enough to the airport that I could commute from Breck. If I felt travel was threatened by weather/traffic I'd just go down early and stay in an airport hotel.

 

Overall, lots of solid advice here already. Great idea, make it happen. Hope you have a great season!

post #18 of 32
I rode a lift last year at Copper Mountain with an older English gentleman. He lives in the UK and, from what I gathered, is semi-retired and pretty well off. Anyway, he said he and his wife rent a condo in Frisco every year for 6 weeks Feb-Mid March. He said they have rented the same condo from the same owners for 15 years. He skis practically every day and his wife joins him on the bluebird days.

So that set a similar dream in my head as well. I grew up a flat lander in Oklahoma that only got to ski 3 days per year on a vacation and always dreamed of living in the mountains. The career never really presented the opportunity so I am planning a similar semi-retirement some day that would allow 6-8 weeks of ski time each year. While a true "ski-town" experience would be wonderful, I would be quite content with a rental in SLC or maybe Silverthorne. Still getting my ducks in a row. For now I'll have to get by with a couple of ski trips per year coupled with the occasional ski day on a layover at work.
post #19 of 32

Monthly rentals are definitely available in Summit County CO.  I've done it.  As had been said, rentals over 30 days avoid the sales tax.  Try VRBO and concentrate on the real by owner units, not those listed by rental agencies.  They will be more open to negotiating a longer rental.  

post #20 of 32
The biggest problem, once you've lived in a ski town,
You'll never want to live anywhere else.
post #21 of 32

Do you value the ski town experience over the actual skiing?  If the skiing is tops, then SLC (Sandy) for sure.  So many great resorts within a 45 minute drive.  Denver, Spokane, even Durango can't match that.  Add in consistent snow quality, and it's a no brainer.  Think about the Mountain Collective Pass if you dig Alta-Bird.

 

If it's the ski town experience, then yeah, housing will be killer expensive.  Three hundred bucks a night for a small condo through VRBO is a prohibitive burn rate, at least for me and everyone else I know.

post #22 of 32
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the feedback thus far.  Right now this is a bit of a pie in the sky concept in my head but hopefully I can make it happen next year.  Some answers to your comments/questions.

 

1. I agree completely that Denver and SLC are not ski towns, hence my use of quotes in the title.  There are a few reasons why cities near world class skiing are on my radar though.  I expect furnished short-term housing to be easier to find there, and cheaper.  Something like a corporate apartment would probably be a good fit for me.  Also the skiing in the SLC area is probably my favorite in the country which is why I mentioned it.  Also I'd be well connected via large airports in the city.  I would love a season in a place like Jackson as well.  But while my finances are in good shape, I'm not "well off" by any means so I need to keep things as reasonable as possible.  I also like the idea of places with several resorts nearby.  I'd likely by a season pass to 1 resort but spend a handful of days at some others.  Cities like SLC are more conducive to this than some of the more remote ski towns.

 

2. I picked 2-3 months duration because most likely I'll just leave my current home empty while away.  If I did a full 5-6 month season I would probably have to find a way to rent my home to cover the costs.  I can probably afford 2-3 months of paying rent and the mortgage.  I tend to travel a lot in December so I wouldn't get much skiing in then anyway, making a January-March stay pretty much the ideal timing for me.

 

3.  Someone mentioned finding a "walk to the lifts" situation so I could easily return home for work mid-day.  That would absolutely be ideal, but I suspect cost will keep me from such an option.  If I stay in a city such as SLC the plan would be to take full days off to ski (particularly powder days), add in some vacation days here and there, and to ski most weekend days.  My biggest concern would be my ability to take off at least 1 day a week for 2-3 months and that most of my skiing will be on the crowded weekends.  If I were walking distance I could easily hit the slopes for a couple of hours a few days per week, and go back to work each day.  That would be better for both my work schedule and for getting more time on the slopes for certain.

 

4. I favor the actual skiing over the "town experience" for sure.  The reason for such a move would 100% be about getting more quality time on the slopes than I'm able to today.  I'm sure I'd love the town experience as well, but the skiing is the bigger motivator without a doubt.

post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post
 

If it's the ski town experience, then yeah, housing will be killer expensive.  Three hundred bucks a night for a small condo through VRBO is a prohibitive burn rate, at least for me and everyone else I know.

 

Wow, condo rental prices must be high in Wyoming!  It's easy to find a 1-bed unit off the mountain in Summit County CO (Dillon, Silverthorne, Frisco) for less than half that.  I typically pay a little over a $100/nite for my 3-week stay in February with cleaning fees, taxes, etc.  A good friend has rented a 2-bed, 2-bath townhouse in Keystone for $4500 (30 day rental) this Feb-March.  I'm guessing its supply and demand.  Lots of supply in Summit County.

post #24 of 32

Have you considered Big Sky Mountain Resort in Big Sky, MT?  Great skiing, large and varied mountain(s), and you have close proximity to Bridger Bowl for skiing variety (equally great ski area).  The only reason Big Sky exists is that a ski area was built on Lone Mountain!  Heck, that makes it truly and "authentic" ski town!!  Bozeman is about 50 miles away and has everything you may need for necessities, flights, and entertainment.  Montana State University is located in Bozeman if you may require any contacts in academia.  Big Sky has a lower town located by US 191, and an upper town at the base of the ski area.  The mountain town is mostly condos, with the most affordable being the located at the base of the Moonlight Basin section of the ski area.  Lastly, Montana has no state sales tax, which is nice, but it does have a state income tax.  Good luck and I hope this helps!

post #25 of 32

I attempted to do something similar in January of 2015.  I too can work remotely on a computer.  Was going to be a 2 month solo trip to Summit County, CO, but it got whittled down to 1 month by my wife.  I figured I would keep the wife, so I headed off from Alabama on Jan 1, 2015 on the road.  Didn't work out as I broke my arm on my 6th day out and my ski sabbatical was shot.

 

However, I get an EPIC pass and go out every year now for 2-3 weeks in January.  Get a place in River Run at Keystone for less than $200 day and can walk to the lifts or drive to the other resorts.  I ski almost every day hard from opening to about 1 pm and then come in and do my work on the computer.  Keeps me happy and get's the work done.  And with the pass, I don't feel like I HAVE to ski all day to get my money's worth on a single day ticket.

 

And I wouldn't worry about State Income Tax since I'm assuming you aren't changing your permanent address AND because there is no physical trace (paycheck) from an employer where ever you end up.

 

Hope you can make it happen.

post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by bamaman View Post
 

However, I get an EPIC pass and go out every year now for 2-3 weeks in January.  Get a place in River Run at Keystone for less than $200 day and can walk to the lifts or drive to the other resorts.  I ski almost every day hard from opening to about 1 pm and then come in and do my work on the computer.  Keeps me happy and get's the work done.  And with the pass, I don't feel like I HAVE to ski all day to get my money's worth on a single day ticket.

 

This is what I've been doing the past few years.  I decided to mix it up and didn't do the Epic pass this year though.   Since most the people I work with are on EST I usually work in the morning and go out for the afternoon (unless it's a powder day of course).  Being slope side is nice and I've had a few times where I've had to come in for an emergency meeting and what not.   I'm in IT so I have to do a lot of my work at night and on the weekends anyway.   Having the Epic pass and not feeling obligated to ski the whole day is great.   I basically go home during high pressure. 

post #27 of 32

Or step it down a notch? Places like Sandpoint, ID (Schweitzer) or Kalispell, MT (Whitefish) offer great skiing with a town very near the base. These places may not be "World Class" but damn they are good. You could slip out for a couple of hours at either of these places and get away with it. Good snow and reasonably sized crowds. You would probably find your costs lower and both are towns so there is a supply of housing available. Both towns have very earthy/country vibes and are close to the BC Alberta boarder, if you feel like a little vacation from your vacation.

 

I work in a project/per Diem industry which means jobs of undetermined duration in smaller towns. On the past several locations I have rented an apartment or house for the shortest term lease I could swing, they always seem to be unfurnished. Then hit the thrift stores or Craigslist. Dishes, furniture, TV,s, vacuum and such all used. If it is a close move, I'll rent a truck for a day, if not it's a do over. I travel with sheets, spices, pots and pans. When the gig is up have a garage sale/Craigslist and what doesn't find a new home gets donated to a thrift store for a deductable donation. $700 seems about the typical cost so far for stuff, with a return of at least $500 each time so far.

 

Just a different option.

 

Go do this. Everyone needs adventures.

post #28 of 32
Not much charm, but there are a lot of Extended Stay America type motels in SLC. Here is a link to a similar furnished extended stay type place (Woodspring) in Ogden for as low as ~$40 per night: https://www.valueplace.com/extended-stay-hotels/locations/utah/ogden/woodspring-suites-ogden/. Good skiing at nearby Snowbasin with a logistical set-up that serves day-visitors very well.
post #29 of 32

An admirable pursuit PJS32000.  I did *something* like this last year and had arguably the best 3 months of my life.  A detailed chronicle can be found here:  https://skibatical2016.wordpress.com.

 

The biggest difference?  I didn’t maintain my professional work life at all.  I took a leave of absence.  I guess there were a few phone calls and a log in here and there, but for all intents and purposes I “unplugged”.  Best decision I could have made.  Might not be as unrealistic as you might think.  I’m not rich.  I’m a grinder.  22 years in software development provided the financial backing and well deserved time off.  Most of the folks on this board could care less about what you do off the slopes, so PM me if you want to work through more in this area.

 

Location.  Forget SLC unless you are going to live in Park City.  Then, forget Park City.  I kid.  Park City has it’s merits.  I could live/ski there.  Forget Denver.  Too much driving if you’re skiing every day.  Too much of everyone else if you are skiing POW days and weekends.  Rating the “ski towns” I’ve spent time in:

  1. Ketchum, ID

  2. Jackson, WY

  3. Whitefish, MT

  4. Summit Co.(Frisco/Dillion/Silverthorne)

  5. Steamboat Springs, CO

I just can’t call SLC a ski town.  You have to be able to walk into a local bar and ask whoever is next to you – “how was your ski day” and have a conversation pick up from there.  It better have a heck of a mountain hill too!  If I were to add in the skiing experience it shuffles the deck a bit (Jackson, Summit, Whitefish, Ketchum, Steamboat.  Jackson is my favorite.  Hands down.  I am working on wintering there long-term)

 

Housing My accommodations came from primarily from AirBnB and Priceline.  My overall goal was to keep accommodations averaging under $100/night.  With the monthly rental in Silverline, this wasn’t a problem.  Week to week proved to be more expensive than the monthly rental.  Nightly hotels for traveling between locations were pretty cheap via Priceline. 

I didn’t live like a prince, but I was far from a pauper.  I always tried to have somewhere to cook a solid breakfast and somewhere to stretch/workout.  Wi-fi was consistently available in most places.  I agree that room mates are not ideal.  There were a few occasions where I met up with people I knew and shared a place.  That tended to work out the best.

 

Furnishings.  Good call – you don’t need to lug around furnishings.  You will want a few key pieces of equipment that you can’t rely on the accommodations providing.  I’ll say I packed way, way, way to much stuff.  https://skibatical2016.wordpress.com/2016/01/04/preparation/ This post gives you a view of all my gear.  Yes, I even packed my full bag of hockey equipment thinking I’d get a skate or two in there.  Didn’t happen. 

Grab at least two large plastic bins to store stuff in.  When you need to tune your skis the two bins and a length of plastic tarp over a yoga mat is all you need.  In terms of “things I couldn’t live without” – I made sure I had means to make good coffee (https://aerobie.com/product/aeropress/), a crockpot, a frying pan, and a decent cooler.  I had 1 bin with kitchen supplies and 1 bin with everything else.

 

Transportation.  I rented a car for 3 months.  Most of the major car companies have options for mult-month rental.  I reserved in September for pickup on December 27 from Hertz through the AAA New England site.  There were issues with availability (aren’t there always) on pickup.  After losing a day, I ended up with a decent Toyata 4-runner for < $3000.  It was a steal.  I won’t do it again.  I did a lot of driving.  A lot.  The XM Radio and NeverLost features were great.  The less than stellar tires and overall performance were not.  Doing it again, I’d put a Thule box on the top of my Audi A4 and buy snow tires in Denver.

In terms of going without a car, I can’t recommend it.  You are going to need it at some point.  You will find good options to get to the slopes without a car, but if you are either a)  pressed for time or b) commuting to the slopes every day you will want your own vehicle.  You may aspire to walk to the slopes, but you’ll end up paying for it in lodging.  I found all the mountains have some sort of public transit offerings, I just wasn’t willing to sacrifice time and energy for them. 

 

Skiing.  I used an Epic Pass, a M.A.X. Pass, and a Mountain Collective pass.  Those passes covered about 80% of my lift privileges.  All told, I spent less than $3K on lift passes.  If you are sticking to one area or town you should do better than that. 

Spend the summer gearing up and taking advantage of off-season sales for clothes and skis.  I took 3 pairs of skis with me and threw 2 out at the end.  1 backup pair I never used (that was easy).  My all-mountain skis were beat (bye-bye Vokel Mantras).  Only the new POW skis purchased this season survived (Line Supernatural 115 w Look Pivot 14 bindings - $353 + $180 + $40 mount < $600 nice!)

Learn to repair and tune your own skis if you haven’t already.  You’ll do it more than expected.  You won’t want to pay for it.

 

Taxes.  See above note regarding working.  Don’t pay taxes if you don’t need to.  I can’t stress this enough.  I recognize how fortunate I was to have the opportunity to put the job on hold, have my wife support it, and the finances to cover it.  Not sure if you can put your job on hold.  Not sure if have a significant other to support it.  Not sure how much you need to get by on a day to day basis.  I was pleasantly surprised how little I need/needed. 

 

The opportunity to SKI EVERY DAY is unmatched for a passionate skier.  As I started my adventure I would say “I really like to ski… I don’t know if I love it enough to do it every day”.  When I finished I can say “I want to ski everyday”.  The complete immersion in the lifestyle was important to me.  I needed to find out if it’s how I want to live or if I just want to take ski vacations.  It’s the way that I want to live.  I’m on a 5 year plan to make it happen permanently.  I’ll be 50 by then.  The only regret I have is that I didn’t make the leap 20 years earlier.  That's easy to say from this position, knowing I didn't have the personal stability and confidence that was important to me at that time.  It took me a while to figure out what's important.  I *think* I'm on the right track now.  :yahoo: 

post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJS32000 View Post

 

4. I favor the actual skiing over the "town experience" for sure.  The reason for such a move would 100% be about getting more quality time on the slopes than I'm able to today.  I'm sure I'd love the town experience as well, but the skiing is the bigger motivator without a doubt.

 

Well, you've never had the town experience. If you've visited a ski town for a vacation, you have not had the town experience. You've had the tourist in town experience. You're just one face in the crowd. However, if you're in town for a couple or few months, it's an entirely different kettle of fish. You get to know a few people that you ski with, and you hang out with/go out with in the evenings. Pretty much every ski town is relatively quiet during the week. If you're a face at a bar or restaurant a few tuesdays or wednesdays in a row, the bartenders and waiters will know you. You'll create connections, and it makes being in town a whole new thing. My three years living in a ski town were amazing, and it wasn't because of the remarkable skiing. 

 

What you are contemplating is being a tourist on a daily basis for a couple months. Nothing wrong with that. Those of us who have lived in ski towns are just saying that you can't beat the experience of being in town, even if it's only for a part of a season. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Tips for moving to a ski "town" for 2-3 months?