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Swix EVO Pro Edger (Power side edge tool)

post #1 of 112
Thread Starter 

http://www.tognar.com/swix-evo-pro-edger-120v/

 

I saw these awhile back but not many, if any, in the states had them but now I see they're available.  

 

I know how much Jacques loves electric side edge tuners so I figured I'd post a link so he could be one of the first to get one. :D

post #2 of 112

Sure would be nice to feel comfortable spending $500 for it, but it would be great to have.

post #3 of 112

I have been eyeing this thing for a few weeks now.  Waiting on some reviews before I pull the trigger.  Who will be the first to try this.....

post #4 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoJo23 View Post
 

http://www.tognar.com/swix-evo-pro-edger-120v/

 

I saw these awhile back but not many, if any, in the states had them but now I see they're available.  

 

I know how much Jacques loves electric side edge tuners so I figured I'd post a link so he could be one of the first to get one. :D


Ha ha!  If you must.........do it.   All those machines with disc will create a harder edge.  That said, I will stay with files and stones.

In one of the latest videos from a WC tech he says most are using files now.  Too much toxic dust created in the room.  People were getting pissed about having to wear respirators.

 

Here is a real tune of a new ski.  Takes time, but after that, it's not so hard to resharpen when it needs it.  Note the steps to soften the machined edge for filing.  Most folks want a machine because they don't know these tricks and have had bad luck with files doing what they are made to do.  Then spent an ass wipe on a fancy file and still suck hard. 

Ha ha ha.....if you have hours to kill.  Or just skip around to avoid all the repetitive steps.

 

 

Hint, go to 36:57          Watch and listen!     For file go to 2.03:20


Edited by Jacques - 1/2/17 at 7:35pm
post #5 of 112
Thread Starter 

Ya, but most can't/don't/want to spend 6 freakin hours tuning one set of skis, either.... ;)

post #6 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoJo23 View Post
 

Ya, but most can't/don't/want to spend 6 freakin hours tuning one set of skis, either.... ;)


Ha ha.  Because of the sandwich construction and the long base bevel it takes a bit longer.  All new skis need an ass wipe of work,  After that it gets way easier.

For a shumck I can do a new ski tune in about 3,5 hours or less.  IE: Cap ski or no sidewall shaping and tip tail work.  A shumck won't know the difference.

You be good MoJo,  remember you reap what you sow.  Like the chef said at the fine Italian restaurant when you been waiting and ask when is my food going to be ready and he says "what do you want......sh##?"

 

mod note: language edited #

post #7 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post


Ha ha.  Because of the sandwich construction and the long base bevel it takes a bit longer.  All new skis need an ass wipe of work,  After that it gets way easier.
For a shumck I can do a new ski tune in about 3,5 hours or less.  IE: Cap ski or no sidewall shaping and tip tail work.  A shumck won't know the difference.
You be good MoJo,  remember you reap what you sow.  Like the chef said at the fine Italian restaurant when you been waiting and ask when is my food going to be ready and he says "what do you want......sh##?"
That was a French restaurant!!!!
post #8 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by near nyquist View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post


Ha ha.  Because of the sandwich construction and the long base bevel it takes a bit longer.  All new skis need an ass wipe of work,  After that it gets way easier.
For a shumck I can do a new ski tune in about 3,5 hours or less.  IE: Cap ski or no sidewall shaping and tip tail work.  A shumck won't know the difference.
You be good MoJo,  remember you reap what you sow.  Like the chef said at the fine Italian restaurant when you been waiting and ask when is my food going to be ready and he says "what do you want......sh##?"
That was a French restaurant!!!!


Ha ha.   Yes, same story there too.

post #9 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobSo View Post

I have been eyeing this thing for a few weeks now.  Waiting on some reviews before I pull the trigger.  Who will be the first to try this.....

I have been using the Swix EVO power Edger for a month now. I got one of the first ones in the US to give feed back on.

This thing so far is a TOTAL game changer. First affordable electric diamond side edger that works as well as the $1800 - $3000 shop models.

It has some neat features. Durable diamond grind wheel. Adjustable edge angle from 90 to 85 degrees. Plugs into 120 V AC, but power supply changes it to 18 V DC for the grinder motor. Compact and well balanced. Puts a freaking unbelievable sharp edge on, with minimal hanging burr. Easy to knock off burr with hard gummy to clean up base edge. Diamond wheel is spring loaded, and tool has built in stops, so you can not overgring edge, unless you do something stupid like holding it in one spot. Keep it moving down the edge, and it takes off minimal metal, especially with the fine grit wheel.

If any of you are wondering why these power edgers make a sharper edge than anything you can do by hand, it is because they swipe across the edge, not along the length. Think about how a barber sharpens a straight razor.

Negatives: Makes grinding dust just like the big boys do. Not as heavy duty as a Snowglide, but this was designed for personal or race family use, not all day shop use. Replacement diamond wheel retails for $100, but Swix claims the average user can get several seasons out of one wheel. We will see about that, but I have used it on at least 20 skis, and it appears that the wheel has minimal wear. How durable is motor? Can parts be replaced? Don't know yet. I am planning to ask Swix these questions.

Got to run now. Can try to answer any questions later.
post #10 of 112

Thanks for the great review, Captain Kirk!  Are you using different grit diamond discs or are you using "fine" as the final touch after diamond stones? 

post #11 of 112
The unit comes with the fine wheel. You can buy a coarse and medium wheel. The coarse wheel would be used for initial edge set up or remove heavy rock damage. I would use the medium to polish the edge on SL skis and leave it at that. There is some chatter in the grapevine that some SL racers actually prefer the rougher grind from a medium wheel, regardless of what brand of grinder is used, for SL racing. Everything else I would finish off with the fine. If your edge angle is set, and the sidewall pulled, you often only need one pass with the fine to get an incrediblly sharp edge. Check/remove the hanging burr, and you are done!

Since I don't have the coarse and medium wheels (yet), I use a simple 4 step process. 1. Hit the edge with a 200 grit Moonflex clamped in an appropriate angle edge guide for a few passes to remove any small rock damage. This will save wear and tear on the Swix wheel. 2. Hit the sidewall with the sidewall puller to make sure all the plastic is out of the way. 3. Hit the edge with one pass of the fine wheel. 4. Remove any hanging burrs from the base edge. Done!! All the other files, guides, stones, etc never leave the tool box.

This is a game changer in two ways. One, you don't need a tool box full of different files, guides, or stones. If you have all 3 grit wheels, which take just a few seconds to change out, you could get away with just the grinder and a sidewall puller. Second, you can not duplicate the edge sharpness with hand tools no matter how hard you try and how long you take.

It will be interesting how this thing holds up long term. Obviously, if you have to tune a ton of skis at a commercial shop, you would be better off with a commercial grinder. But for personal use, or family use, Swix may have hit a grand slam with this thing.

One last thing: This will make some grinding dust like all power tools do. Play it safe and wear a mask. You can pick up a mask at any hardware store. Most of the grind residue is heavy (not like sawdust that floats around) so it falls directly on the tuning bench and can be wiped up with a damp rag. Use the same precautions as you would use with any power tool.
Edited by CaptainKirk - 1/4/17 at 12:03pm
post #12 of 112

Okay, I just posted this on another thread.  But here you go.  Listen for two minutes.

 

https://youtu.be/ZdgshStMh0A?t=25m57s

post #13 of 112

I think it's a great idea to run the 200 grit Moonflex before using the Evo Pro Edger.  This way I can check that the sidewall is being cleared.  Also, it looks pretty easy to use, unlike the Edge tune Pro II.  That unit gave me extremely inconsistent results but I loved the hardened finish.  I am sold on this product.  I just have to convince the wife that I really "NEED" this.  She should be happy that my interest has shifted from the more expensive Snow Glide!    

post #14 of 112
Thread Starter 

Jacques, you ole sly dog, I always knew you secretly loved side edge disc grinders and posting this video just proves it.  Lets see, he says a machined edge is sharper, stays sharp longer, and the skis edge life will be longer using a machine.  You just secretly sold about ten new Swix EVO Pro Edge power tuners with this video.  Do you work on a commission basis with Swix??? ;) 

post #15 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoJo23 View Post
 

Jacques, you ole sly dog, I always knew you secretly loved side edge disc grinders and posting this video just proves it.  Lets see, he says a machined edge is sharper, stays sharp longer, and the skis edge life will be longer using a machine.  You just secretly sold about ten new Swix EVO Pro Edge power tuners with this video.  Do you work on a commission basis with Swix??? ;) 


Ha ha ha!  Although many say a machine disc can make a "sharper" edge.......I don't believe it.  We are talking about a point of steel that is not too far removed from 90 degrees.

 

It's not like a knife or razor blade.  I think that many just don't take the time needed when using hand tools and or just don't know what they are doing well enough yet.  Many folks are always looking for an easy way out.

 

I agree that the heat created using a machine disc will create a hardened edge.  That should stay sharper a while longer.

 

If you listened the guy said hand filed and polished edges were better for speed events in a matter of words.  He even said the only reason he is using a SnowGlide is because that's what Ted liked.  Prior he was tuning by hand.  It's hard to find a good hand, so many because of that, go for the machine.  The machine is quick.  So for some the time saved is huge.  I know from my own experience on my own skis that the hand filed and hand polished edge is faster on edge.

 

Bottom line for me is I will remain a hand tuner and be proud of it.  As the years have gone by I have only gotten better at it.  Bla bla bla.........

post #16 of 112

Oh by the way.....I never even got a free bottle of Swix Glide Wax Cleaner for this one and it has lots of views.  I say "remover" a few times, but hey, I had a few beers!

 

Although they say it is for cleaning fluoros from the base, I use it instead of hot scraping.  It only softens the wax and does not remove it!

 

post #17 of 112
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 


 

 

If you listened the guy said hand filed and polished edges were better for speed events in a matter of words.  

 

Nooooo, he does NOT say hand filed is better, he said more and more are going back to hand filing for speed events, BUT, then he follows up by saying he doesn't know why.  Maybe you had one to many silver bullets before listening or you were exhausted from tuning two sets of skis in a single day which would be over 12 hours. :ROTF

 

It's all good, you know I've got to raz you when I can. :devil:

post #18 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoJo23 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 


 

 

If you listened the guy said hand filed and polished edges were better for speed events in a matter of words.  

 

Nooooo, he does NOT say hand filed is better, he said more and more are going back to hand filing for speed events, BUT, then he follows up by saying he doesn't know why.  Maybe you had one to many silver bullets before listening or you were exhausted from tuning two sets of skis in a single day which would be over 12 hours. :ROTF

 

It's all good, you know I've got to raz you when I can. :devil:


Oh....no worries!  Just read between the lines.  He doesn't know why?   That is saying something right there.  He knows why, he just is careful not to step on any toes.  Notice all the cuts in the video?

 

post #19 of 112

Unlike Jacques, the older I get, the less interested I am in spending an hour or more to "really" tune and wax a pair of skis.

 

I absolutely LUST after one of these.

 

On a related topic, I'd also pay real money for something that worked and lasted as well as a good hot wax, but wiped on in a minute or two...........

post #20 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRPufnStf View Post
 

Unlike Jacques, the older I get, the less interested I am in spending an hour or more to "really" tune and wax a pair of skis.

 

I absolutely LUST after one of these.

 

On a related topic, I'd also pay real money for something that worked and lasted as well as a good hot wax, but wiped on in a minute or two...........


Here you go.  Scroll down to no iron waxes.  http://www.dominatorwax.com/products

 

Hyperzoompaste waxmomentium warmMomentium Cold wax

post #21 of 112
A few more tips for using this thing:

Don't worry about downward pressure. The disk shaft is spring loaded, so it will always exert the proper pressure for the diamond disk to contact the edge.

Find a way to hold it to maintain constant side pressure on the ski base. It doesn't matter if the ski base is facing away or towards you. Either way works for the grind. Find which base direction works best for you. Maintaining constant side pressure is critical to ensure that the edge angle stays consistent, just like with a hand guide.

Don't start the grinder until you have it set on the ski with solid pressure against the base. It is hard to line it up to the edge if it is running before you have it set against the ski. If you set the grinder against the ski first, then hit the power switch, it is super easy to use.

There is an arrow on the unit that shows the direction to move the grinder along the edge. The arrow also locates the edge of the wheel diameter. This makes it simple to locate on the edge where the grind will start. For example, if I am doing a tip to tail grind, I set the grinder against the base so the arrow is at the transition where the edge curves up to the tip. Once set, I hit the power switch, move along the ski at a steady rate, then let the grinder slip off the back of the ski where the edge curves around the tail. I then flip the ski and grind the second edge in the same way, except the travel is tail to tip.

Find a way to keep the low voltage power cord out of the way. At first, I was hanging it above the tuning bench, but I also found just wrapping it around one of your arms works just as well.
post #22 of 112

Spring loaded....hmmm, that may or may not be good.  If the stone is a bit out it could cause some undulations.  Warbilies worble, but the don't fall down!

 

Seems you are liking the machine.  Good info and I know you have some machine experience.  Many will appreciate your review.

post #23 of 112

http://www.razor-tune.com

 

I think this is my choice.  I love the edge it puts on, the wheel is fantastic and yes, my 14 year old can make it work, really really well.  Worth a look.

 

C.

post #24 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by casoundinc View Post
 

http://www.razor-tune.com

 

I think this is my choice.  I love the edge it puts on, the wheel is fantastic and yes, my 14 year old can make it work, really really well.  Worth a look.

 

C.


Lazy folks and another POS   I laughed at the video where he goes back and forth with it several times, then slips it out of alignment.

 

But hey, that's just one opinion.  I have one just like everyone else.  :devil:

post #25 of 112

I actually don't agree...  The guide is offset so you can actually go back and forth.  But I digress, I can spend all day doing all of this by hand...  two kids, four pairs of skis, plus mine, plus the wife, plus the friends who can't or don't know how.  Sure I get some help from the kids but they have homework as well and well...  Compared to the swix device, I'll take this.  I also have a pro-tek that I like, but for wheel compound I am a fan.  Sure simple, but I am OK with that. I am reticent to use phrases like POS.  Equally un-impressive when tossed around casually by people who have never designed a tool.  Not perfect, sure.  POS?  Lets see you do better?

 

C.

post #26 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by casoundinc View Post
 

I actually don't agree...  The guide is offset so you can actually go back and forth.  But I digress, I can spend all day doing all of this by hand...  two kids, four pairs of skis, plus mine, plus the wife, plus the friends who can't or don't know how.  Sure I get some help from the kids but they have homework as well and well...  Compared to the swix device, I'll take this.  I also have a pro-tek that I like, but for wheel compound I am a fan.  Sure simple, but I am OK with that. I am reticent to use phrases like POS.  Equally un-impressive when tossed around casually by people who have never designed a tool.  Not perfect, sure.  POS?  Lets see you do better?

 

C.


Don't take it personally.  I'm sure it's a fine grinder in good hands.  Like I said, it's just me!  It's just one opinion.  Trust me....my opinion doesn't mean much.

BTW, I think you meant that you "can't" and not can.  And yes I spend hours where you don't have them.  I get it.  Many folks love those edging machines.

Some like a coloring book, or a Spirograph.  Some like to paint fine art.  To each his own.  It's all good.  Oh BTW welcome to EpicSki.
Here is the worlds longest tuning video ever.
 

post #27 of 112

I dub thee "doc..." and yep.  Longest tuning video ever.  Now mandatory viewing for the kids.  They hate you but I am stoked.  Should do one for race skis.  I get parents who ask me how all the time and would LOVE to point them at something like this for race skis.

 

C.

post #28 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by casoundinc View Post
 

I dub thee "doc..." and yep.  Longest tuning video ever.  Now mandatory viewing for the kids.  They hate you but I am stoked.  Should do one for race skis.  I get parents who ask me how all the time and would LOVE to point them at something like this for race skis.

 

C.


Ha ha ha.  Darn kids!  I have a bunch of silly videos of hand work.  At my channel one needs to search "tuning waxing" etc, as there are over 1000 videos there.

The machine would be sacrilegious for me to use, seems just like the EVO.   Lot of competition in the marketplace.  Many folks up in here swear by these disc grinders. 

Then some like me are just old curmudgeons who refuse to change.

I can't really say this is race tuning, but basic and much shorter tuning video series for those who still use hand tools.  Seems a dying breed.  Jim from Start Haus has some of the best tuning videos for race and they are very short.  Search StartHaus on YouTube.

post #29 of 112

Okay.  It's dream time.  I dream of hand tuned edges. 

post #30 of 112

Our U16s just raced at West Mountain (NY) this weekend.  They met the owner of Razor Tune there.  They were raving about how great this product looked.  Good enough that they are looking into a possible group buy.  I like the fact that it is tuned with the base up.  Seems very easy to use.  However, I have my concerns though.  How accurate is this bevel?  Will the company still be around when I need a replacement wheel? 

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