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Say what?... Skiing jargon [A Beginner Zone thread] - Page 4

post #91 of 109

Reminder . . . this is a Beginner Zone thread with the following as Post #1.  Let's see if any relative newcomers to alpine skiing have any questions about terminology not yet mentioned.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

Something that can be intimidating for many new skiers and riders is the introduction to a whole new world of language associated with skiing. Some terms are "official" terms, and others are slang terms that skiers use. For many new skiers, they pick up on some terms, while others they don't quite understand. It can be embarrassing to admit you don't understand things sometimes, so many beginners just nod and pretend they know, while suffering in silence and trying to figure out what the term means from context clues. 

 

Well, let's do our best to clarify any terms that may be unclear or confusing. I'm going to start in the next post with a couple terms that have been brought up that multiple new skiers have expressed they didn't initially understand. 

 

But most importantly, this is a place for anyone to ask for clarification on a term they've heard but don't understand. There won't be any judgement, just a best effort to explain. 

 

Usage tip: The green arrow in the Quote above is a "forward" link.  Hover over it until you get the pointing hand pointer, then click to go to the original post/thread.

post #92 of 109
What's a plug ski?
post #93 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by newboots View Post

What's a plug ski?

 

It's a plug boot actually, not the ski. 

 

This is from skis.com buying guide for race boots :

 

Quote:
Plug Boots– These boots are very stiff and very narrow. They often have lace up liners for a more precise fit. They often come with a better powerstrap as well. They are designed with the intention of requiring a professional boot fitter to do custom shell work in order for the boot to fit properly. These types of boots are typically only worn by elite racers, competing in FIS races. Due to the small amount of racers who choose to ski in a plug boot and the amount of custom adjusting often required to make them fit, most retailers do not stock plug boots.

 

Despite what they say about who wears plug boots, they come up fairly often on threads around here, so either some posters are FIS racers, or they ski like they are! :D

post #94 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newboots View Post

What's a plug ski?

 

It's a plug boot actually, not the ski. 

 

This is from skis.com buying guide for race boots :

 

Quote:
Plug Boots– These boots are very stiff and very narrow. They often have lace up liners for a more precise fit. They often come with a better powerstrap as well. They are designed with the intention of requiring a professional boot fitter to do custom shell work in order for the boot to fit properly. These types of boots are typically only worn by elite racers, competing in FIS races. Due to the small amount of racers who choose to ski in a plug boot and the amount of custom adjusting often required to make them fit, most retailers do not stock plug boots.

 

Despite what they say about who wears plug boots, they come up fairly often on threads around here, so either some posters are FIS racers, or they ski like they are! :D


Can also come up for women with small feet who need boots Mondo size 22 or smaller.

post #95 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post


Can also come up for women with small feet who need boots Mondo size 22 or smaller.

What's a Mondo size?
post #96 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post


Can also come up for women with small feet who need boots Mondo size 22 or smaller.

What's a Mondo size?

:)

 

What is mondo shoe size?
Unlike ordinary shoes, a ski boot is measured in Mondo point sizing. This was produced by ski boot manufacturers in order to provide a universal measurement for ski boots. Mondo points are actually measured in centimeters.
post #97 of 109

What are "seeded" moguls?

 

What are pivot slips?

 

When you "demo" skis, you rent them for the day?  What are demo bindings?

 

Thanks for the inexhaustible flow of wisdom!

post #98 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by newboots View Post
 

What are "seeded" moguls?

 

There are grooming machines that make moguls... some of them make small ones, and as the run gets skied and gets new snow, they develop or grow into larger bumps. So the run was seeded with small bumps.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newboots View Post

 

What are pivot slips?

 

Pivot slips are an exercise where you do side slips continuously switching between skis turned right and then left. They're an edge control exercise. Here's a video from PSIA :

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newboots View Post
 

When you "demo" skis, you rent them for the day?  What are demo bindings?

 

"Demo" skis could mean two things :

 

1) Sometimes they just mean upgraded rentals. Often you'll have a choice of different models that you'd like to try, or demo. Many large resorts will offer different levels of rentals, with "demo" being the highest end with the newest equipment. And you can usually swap them throughout the day. 

 

For example, Vail's own rentals (http://www.vailsports.com/winter-rentals/) offer three levels - sport, performance, and demo.

 

2) "Demo skis" could refer to a ski demo day where makers or ski shops have a variety of different skis to try throughout the day. Check this thread : http://www.epicski.com/t/142999/what-is-a-demo-day-for-skis-a-beginner-zone-thread

 

Demo bindings are any rental binding that can be adjusted for any size boot. They are on a rail they can slide along and the rail is attached to the ski. Alternatively, people that buy their own skis and bindings often get a fixed binding that is mounted to match their boot. It's attached directly to the ski without any kind of rail system.

 

But some skis you buy may still come with demo bindings (mine did). Here's a standard bindings without adjustments, the heel and toe pieces screwed directly to the skis :

 

 

And a demo binding - mine, in fact. You can see there's a rail and scale in the middle and the bindings can be slid back and forth to accommodate different boots :

 

 

Here's the rail in between the heel and toe pieces :

 

 

People often prefer non-demo bindings because they're lighter and simpler.

post #99 of 109
@dbostedo

Helpful and thorough! And raises the question, the standard bindings were mounted without "adjustments." Are adjustments the heel lifts and shims that I hear discussed? Because I thought those were for boots.

Thank you lots! The video and photos were wonderful.
post #100 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by newboots View Post

@dbostedo

Helpful and thorough! And raises the question, the standard bindings were mounted without "adjustments." Are adjustments the heel lifts and shims that I hear discussed? Because I thought those were for boots.

Thank you lots! The video and photos were wonderful.

 

All recreational bindings have an adjustable heel to fine tune the forward pressure (there are arrows or small windows or hash marks or slots etc that let you know when the forward pressure is correctly set. There is a wide enough range of movement, often on a small track, that allow a few different sized boots to work without have to remount the heel piece (drill new mounting holes to move it forward or back for a new smaller or larger boot).

post #101 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

 

All recreational bindings have an adjustable heel to fine tune the forward pressure (there are arrows or small windows or hash marks or slots etc that let you know when the forward pressure is correctly set. There is a wide enough range of movement, often on a small track, that allow a few different sized boots to work without have to remount the heel piece (drill new mounting holes to move it forward or back for a new smaller or larger boot).

 

Thanks for the clarification - I knew there was some amount of adjustment in standard bindings, but the description of why helps.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newboots View Post

...the standard bindings were mounted without "adjustments." Are adjustments the heel lifts and shims that I hear discussed? Because I thought those were for boots.

 

The bindings aren't related to heel lifts or shims as you've probably seen them. As DanoT described, the standard bindings can be move a little to set their hold on the boot correctly (the forward pressure) and to accommodate a couple of different sized boots. So not very much adjustment.

 

On the demo bindings, they can move several inches to accommodate just about any boot, or even to move the same boot forward or backward a bit in where you stand on the skis. So a much broader range of adjustment.

 

You might also occasionally see a mention of a lifter or plate for a binding. Those are designed to get the binding and boot up higher off the ski, for people who lean the skis WAY over in hard turns, and don't want their boots to hit the snow - i.e. racers. If the boot hits the snow (called "booting out") it can disrupt their turn or lead to a crash. 

 

Heel lifts and shims are usually to control the forward/backward, or side-to-side lean of the boots so that they are properly setup for your anatomy and proper stance; Or sometimes heel lifts might just be for the fit of the boot.

post #102 of 109

What is DIRT?

 

How is it that people know how many vertical feet they've skied?

post #103 of 109

Duration

Intensity

Rate

Timing

 

You can take one skill or task and vary any of those four factors, showing how one movement may be applied very differently at different speeds, intensities, etc.

 

I have a watch that tracks my vertical feet.  If you ski a mountain that is 1,000 feet vertical drop (the difference between the altitude of the summit and the base) than 10 runs would be 10,000 vertical feet.

 

Both Berkshire East and Wachusett are about 1,000 vertical feet.

post #104 of 109

There is a phone app  "Ski Tracks" that measures your vertical feet (per run, per day, per season) among other things (like GPS track of where you went, max speed, etc......)

post #105 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newboots View Post
 

What is DIRT?

 

How is it that people know how many vertical feet they've skied?

 

I have a spreadsheet that has the vertical of every lift on my home mountain. If I know what lifts I skied that day and how many times I skied them, I can calculate my vertical. I used to track my vertical before I had kids. Now I don't have time, and I'd rather not see how much less I'm doing now. The last season I tracked was 13-14, and I skied a little over a million vertical feet. 

post #106 of 109

Ski jargon: A "chair stopper" is the last thing you want to be at any ski area.

post #107 of 109

What does "BAFL" mean?

post #108 of 109
Apparently Big air, flat landing. Had to Google it. I'm not a park person.
post #109 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by socalgal View Post

What does "BAFL" mean?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Apparently Big air, flat landing. Had to Google it. I'm not a park person.

To elaborate a bit more, most times when folks jump (or ski off cliffs often referred to as "hucking") the landing is softened by landing on a steep slope. Landing on a flat spot is much harder on the body and makes it more likely you'll crash or get hurt.
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