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Anybody wearing hip protection

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I had a few crashes last year where I wish I was..
I'm going to get a set of these for this year..
The east coast boiler plate left me black and blue on 2 of those falls.



http://www.xsportsprotective.com/collections/snowboard-padded-shorts-pants/products/g-form-pro-x-compression-shorts
post #2 of 24
Thread Starter 
Bunch of reads and not even a single bash.. smile.gif

Kyle
post #3 of 24

I don't know.  The worst bruise I got in the past few years was a fall in the loading area just about to get onto the chair.  I'm thinking it's kinda like the hockey helmet thing over the years; now NHL players wear helmets, but it doesn't seem to help because players don't protect their heads as much as they used to.   Back in the day, you kept your head up and didn't turn your back on the other team's player so he could check you in the numbers  (and you would have given Zdeno a good left hook before you let him drive your head into the stanchion).  I look at taking a good bruise on the hips as a lesson to not do that again.  A lesson I would heed less if I were wearing armor.  

 

Who knows?  In another 20 years I may give in and change my mind; it takes a lot longer to heal as you get older (talking about grade 3 shoulder separations and broken ribs).

post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 
If your not fallen your not tryin..
I could ski the entire season and not crash..
i figure if your not skiing on that edge it will never change
While we are comparing it to hockey.. I'd pick shin pads over a helmet anyday

Kyle
post #5 of 24
I wear em
For protecting my hips
And they keep your ass warm to boot
post #6 of 24
Tried them, too bulky and restrictive, they don't fit in my current non-baggy ski pants well.
post #7 of 24
I wear them, but at my 6'6", 225 lb some of my falls have been pretty spectacular and painful on east coast hard pack. At my svelte size, you can't even tell I have them on!
post #8 of 24

I just wear my hockey breezers to check the snowboarders out of the way 

post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speerhead View Post

Bunch of reads and not even a single bash.. smile.gif

Kyle

 

They make you look fat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

I don't know.  The worst bruise I got in the past few years was a fall in the loading area just about to get onto the chair.  I'm thinking it's kinda like the hockey helmet thing over the years; now NHL players wear helmets, but it doesn't seem to help because players don't protect their heads as much as they used to.   Back in the day, you kept your head up and didn't turn your back on the other team's player so he could check you in the numbers  (and you would have given Zdeno a good left hook before you let him drive your head into the stanchion).  I look at taking a good bruise on the hips as a lesson to not do that again.  A lesson I would heed less if I were wearing armor.  

 

Who knows?  In another 20 years I may give in and change my mind; it takes a lot longer to heal as you get older (talking about grade 3 shoulder separations and broken ribs).

Saw a small guy try to start a fight with Chara. He just pushed the guy away and shook his head. Only other time I've seen that--when Fetisov was first in the NHL somebody tried to start a fight and he was like "WTF is this?". He learned.

post #10 of 24

This is what you want.

http://g-form.com/technology

 

Super high tech stuff. Thin flexible foam that instantly turns into a hard shell on impact to distribute forces

post #11 of 24

I just bought them for this year to go with my new Cheater GS skis.

post #12 of 24

I've never considered wearing padding/protection... but I got my first really bad bruise on my hip last season (hit the backside of a mogul pretty solidly sideways and them fell over it onto my hip). I don't think I'll wear padding yet, but I guess it's something to keep in mind...

post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post

I've never considered wearing padding/protection... but I got my first really bad bruise on my hip last season (hit the backside of a mogul pretty solidly sideways and them fell over it onto my hip). I don't think I'll wear padding yet, but I guess it's something to keep in mind...

I started wearing my padded shorts after one particularly bad fall on an icy slope caused a very bad bruise that led to sensitivity in that spot on my hip/butt. Even minor falls on that sport would irritate it considerably, but with the shorts I've had no issues. I also don't fall nearly as much as I used to! Like you, I started skiing as a working adult (started at age 50) and am trying to advance as fast as possible while avoiding injury.
post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 

 The last fall on a icy spot near the bottom of the hill..

I sacrificed​ myself for a smaller female..   I am 6'3" 225lbs..  It was her or me and let her off..  I would have felt worse if that collision would have happened..

 

Anyhow fast forward to that evening..  I sat in the recliner at home watching a UFC card with my jeans on ..

When I stood up something was wrong..  The softball size bump on my hip was so large my jeans would barely come off..

 

This year I'll be wearing something more than not

 

Kyle

post #15 of 24

In my official rain-on-parade capacity, will point out that falls on hips often - not always, obviously, if OP's was evasive maneuver - result from banking a turn, e.g., leaning back into the slope, edges let go, hip goes down hard. So maybe a few lessons on projecting down the mountain will be better protection for many than hip pads?

 

In all honesty, less sure a lot of this is about real protection than it is about psychology. We get hurt, it impacts how we ski when we've healed. After I broke my nose and thumb last winter, wore thumb braces and thought seriously about midface/nose guards like in the NBA, settled for a chin guard, which is fine for SL but dumb for freeskiing. So I felt a bit more secure. But doubt that I was actually at lower risk for anything. Prolly higher. The literature is not kind to pads and braces and such. They do reduce simple bruises. They do not prevent joint injuries or broken bones except in the case of boots, which have reduced lower ankle breaks at the most of increasing risk of spiral fractures above the boot line. And I didn't ski right for most of the season; lost a certain amount of necessary anticipation with my upper body and pole plants. 

 

Also have found that more armor also = less connectedness to the environment. My poles were a distant sensation. I'm reminded of motorcycling, where full armor does seem to prevent certain classes of injuries involving impact or abrasion. But when you're all secure inside all that gear - and I had the whole enchilada, including a full face helmet - you feel like you're inside a spacesuit. It's a tradeoff some make, others resist (always love to see kids on sport bikes; helmets, then flip flops or sneakers, t-shirt, jeans. Trailers for what a belt sander - asphalt at highway speed - can do to human flesh).

 

In skiing, which is all about being right there with the elements, not sure I want the same trade. But YMMV, for sure. Meanwhile, I'd seriously think about having a L3 check out the form to make sure you haven't compensated in the wrong way. Our bodies do that without being asked, incessantly. 

post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

In my official rain-on-parade capacity, will point out that falls on hips often - not always, obviously, if OP's was evasive maneuver - result from banking a turn, e.g., leaning back into the slope, edges let go, hip goes down hard. So maybe a few lessons on projecting down the mountain will be better protection for many than hip pads?

 

In all honesty, less sure a lot of this is about real protection than it is about psychology. We get hurt, it impacts how we ski when we've healed. After I broke my nose and thumb last winter, wore thumb braces and thought seriously about midface/nose guards like in the NBA, settled for a chin guard, which is fine for SL but dumb for freeskiing. So I felt a bit more secure. But doubt that I was actually at lower risk for anything. Prolly higher. The literature is not kind to pads and braces and such. They do reduce simple bruises. They do not prevent joint injuries or broken bones except in the case of boots, which have reduced lower ankle breaks at the most of increasing risk of spiral fractures above the boot line. And I didn't ski right for most of the season; lost a certain amount of necessary anticipation with my upper body and pole plants. 

 

Also have found that more armor also = less connectedness to the environment. My poles were a distant sensation. I'm reminded of motorcycling, where full armor does seem to prevent certain classes of injuries involving impact or abrasion. But when you're all secure inside all that gear - and I had the whole enchilada, including a full face helmet - you feel like you're inside a spacesuit. It's a tradeoff some make, others resist (always love to see kids on sport bikes; helmets, then flip flops or sneakers, t-shirt, jeans. Trailers for what a belt sander - asphalt at highway speed - can do to human flesh).

 

In skiing, which is all about being right there with the elements, not sure I want the same trade. But YMMV, for sure. Meanwhile, I'd seriously think about having a L3 check out the form to make sure you haven't compensated in the wrong way. Our bodies do that without being asked, incessantly. 


​ Your likely correct about everything here,

But the fact remains I don't stubborn to "ski less aggressively" and likely make all kinds of errors in technique... 

But I will re-iterate crossing that ability line is making me a better skier..  I have seen this hip pads..  I'd be surprised If I or anybody else could tell I am wearing them,,  This is nothing like football or hockey equipment.. 

 

Kyle

post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

In my official rain-on-parade capacity, will point out that falls on hips often - not always, obviously, if OP's was evasive maneuver - result from banking a turn, e.g., leaning back into the slope, edges let go, hip goes down hard. So maybe a few lessons on projecting down the mountain will be better protection for many than hip pads?

 

My wife sustained a pretty epic bruise during a lesson last season. She panicked and fell backwards to avoid running off the trail.  She is not sure what happened next, but she most likely landed on top of her ski boot, binding, small stump or something else equally unyielding.  This is based on the quality of the bruise that resulted.  The bruise covered the entire back of her thigh!

 

Anyway, padded shorts probably would have helped.

 

My personal solution has been to fall only at speed and on steeper terrain.  That way the impact is glancing ;)

 

 

post #18 of 24

post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by near nyquist View Post

I wear em
For protecting my hips
And they keep your ass warm to boot


​nice! you have them long ones ... riding from buns to ankles!  :D

 

 

lucky for me, I was told I know how to role with a fall .... just like them vaudeville actors!

post #20 of 24
Originally Posted by TexSkier View Post
......

My personal solution has been to fall only at speed and on steeper terrain.  That way the impact is glancing ;)

 

True ;), but tragic when the downed skier slides at speed into an immovable object.  Speaking from experience here. 


Edited by LiquidFeet - 10/20/16 at 3:27pm
post #21 of 24

Just another layer (that cannot be removed during the day) to get through at the bathroom and a waste of time and 3-4 chairs passing while waiting in line. It's the kind of thing people by because of the reasoning and eventually stop using due to a lack of actualized benefits during a continued span of ongoing inconvenience. Shift the risk matrix to a helmet and then you are cooking with gas.

post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

 

Here's your crash pants, oldgoat.  You'll want to be wearing them on the inside of your snow pants, not the outside.

 

post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

 

Here's your crash pants, oldgoat.  You'll want to be wearing them on the inside of your snow pants, not the outside.

 

I was talking about pictures of the bruises.

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

I was talking about pictures of the bruises.

 

Not going to post them, but this bruise was similar: http://sfcitizen.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/156ralj-copy.jpg

 

Hers was about 2x the size vertical, similar width.

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