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Ski Instructor Demo: Short video of TDK skiing in St Anton

post #1 of 62
Thread Starter 

Its all there. Wedge to parallel, carving and bumps :). In a lesson format. Check it out and come with feedback.

 

post #2 of 62

Nice piece of work TDK, You bring it!

post #3 of 62

Ditto!

post #4 of 62

Good Stuff. Thanks for sharing

post #5 of 62

Great job TDK, you walk the walk!

post #6 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

Great job TDK, you walk the walk!

Did you even watch the video? ... there's no walking whatsoever. Sometimes it seems like you are posting from the clouds.

post #7 of 62

hardy har har har.   Yes I watched the whole thing.  One could watch everything the top coaches on epic post of their skiing in a pretty short amount of time.

 

And although I know you know the saying, perhaps our friend from the other side of the pond doesn't.

 

"If you're going to talk the talk, you need be be able to walk the walk."

post #8 of 62

Does everybody ski Dalbellos now? I picked up one as well, which works sort of, but still needs some grinding...

 

Good skiing!


Edited by razie - 10/18/16 at 9:28pm
post #9 of 62

Knee-Ice Fo Sho!  Mucho gusto!

post #10 of 62
Compliments to you and to your camera operator.
post #11 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 

Does everybody ski Dalbellos now? I picked up one as well, which works sort of, but still needs some grinding...

 

Good skiing!

 

Thanks. Here the most popular race boots are Atomic, Nordica, Lange, Salomon and Rossignol.  I'm the only one using Dalbello it seems. They fit my feet and skiing well even thou they need lots of tweaks such as stretching and foot bead modification. Tried to go back to my Redsters from a few years back but they hurt all over. When I stuck my feet back in the Dalbello’s it felt like a perfect fit. The first 130 versions were way too stiff for me but the newer ones, now discontinued, are much better. Easier to put on and get off. Still, even if it’s not very cold I need a hair blower for putting them on and taking them off.

post #12 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

Compliments to you and to your camera operator.

 

Yeah, my brother is good. He's the only one that knows exactly what to do and what I look for. I don't need to explain anything and he takes orders without ever objecting if not for a very good reason.

post #13 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 

Knee-Ice Fo Sho!  Mucho gusto!

 

Thanks, but not so hard on the knees as one might think.

post #14 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 

Knee-Ice Fo Sho!  Mucho gusto!

 

Thanks, but not so hard on the knees as one might think.


Ha ha.  I guess for you I need to say "Nice For Sure"!   That's the translation.

post #15 of 62

Anyone who skis with bad knees and does not inline skate during the offseason has been severely mislead in one way or another. No, don't have a blast gliding through city streets bullet proofing your balance and 43 other core athletic skills relevant to skiing while fully rehabbing your knee. Just sit back and wait until the conditions escalates to the need of surgery where you can simply ly back, take a snooze and let others take care of all the rest. 

post #16 of 62

I like your skiing and your attitude.  I hope you get some discussion of the content -- I like it that you provide a (slightly) alternative point of view from the standard U.S. progression.  I don't have the teaching experience to have a real for or against opinion, though, or even catalog exactly what is different.  (I followed your debates with Bud ten or fifteen years ago very closely, since that was when I was working hard to modernize my skiing.  But I have to admit I don't remember what the debates were about.)

 

I did note the up un-weighting and liked the explicit distinction between a skidded parallel ("parallel christie"?) and carved parallel.

post #17 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

I like your skiing and your attitude.  I hope you get some discussion of the content -- I like it that you provide a (slightly) alternative point of view from the standard U.S. progression.  I don't have the teaching experience to have a real for or against opinion, though, or even catalog exactly what is different.  (I followed your debates with Bud ten or fifteen years ago very closely, since that was when I was working hard to modernize my skiing.  But I have to admit I don't remember what the debates were about.)

 

I did note the up un-weighting and liked the explicit distinction between a skidded parallel ("parallel christie"?) and carved parallel.

 

Thanks for your good words on the video. Hahaa... yes, we had lots of debates with Bud. Great guy. Cant remember all the arguments we had but probably had something to do with how we initiate wedge- and parallel turns. Active vs passive weight transfer and positive vs negative movements. This is the reason I did not tell any specific movements or HOW I did a wedge turn or a parallel turn. Just general information and a few things I taught important.

 

Glad you liked the concept of separating skidded and carved turns. I think this is a highly neglected issue and I would like for people to really understand the difference. There is another important distinction I did not make and that is the difference between skidded linked parallel turns and skidded parallel turns  out of a traverse. Linked turns are really all about  pressure control and momentum. If you can make a skidded parallel turn out of a traverse at snails speed without a wedge entry you are good. If you struggle with it, its an indication everything is not in order. Some basic fundamental skills and techniques issues. However, easy to fix.

post #18 of 62

Nice video.  Your video of your skiing matches your description.  Having seen numerous similar videos, I am not surprised.   No need for me to mention any flaws deviations from exactly what you meant to do; I am sure you already see them yourself.

post #19 of 62
@tdk6

One question. In your (excellent) video you talk about catching a little air in the bumps for momentum and control. I understand the momentum aspec, but how does it help with control? I do it for fun😀
post #20 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post

@tdk6

One question. In your (excellent) video you talk about catching a little air in the bumps for momentum and control. I understand the momentum aspec, but how does it help with control? I do it for fun😀

 

Hi, thanks!

 

Nice to have a question. Added control in my case comes from two sources. At the top of the turn I'm at my most vulnerable phase of the turn. If I catch a bit of air I clear my skis from uneven terrain obstacles such as crud, slush and crust as I head into the fall line I feel like I'm in better control. Also, as I land I have added momentum and I sink through the snow surface further down than I would have done normally and it feels like riding rails instead of being bounced all over the place and having the skis behave uncontrolled underneath me.

 

I read an article in a skiing magazine a while ago of an offpist pro skiing in Chamonix that said the total opposite. Always keep your skis on the snow. I guess I'm not at his level yet :). No absolutes here and I know it.

post #21 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
.......

I read an article in a skiing magazine a while ago of an offpist pro skiing in Chamonix that said the total opposite. Always keep your skis on the snow. I guess I'm not at his level yet :). No absolutes here and I know it.

 

I once asked a crusty older PSIA examiner with gray hair and a long respected history in instruction about that proscription against letting the skis leave the snow.  He was catching air from the rebound on every turn, and he was skiing fantastic.  I asked him if he was "grandfathered in."  

 

He chuckled and said nothing.  So I asked more pointedly if the admonition to not let the skis leave the snow was addressed to lower level skiers who were skiing aft and had to pick up the new inside ski to get it out of the way, and he said yes.

 

We know that racers need to keep their skis on the snow for control, but that's not what we are talking about here.  Advanced/expert skiers who want the air between turns because it feels great should be able to do that without worrying about breaking some rule.  That no-air-between-turns-rule applies to instructors in the midst of teaching, because it might mislead their students into thinking they are OK when they ski aft and lift the tips of their new inside ski between turns.

post #22 of 62
Don't turn the skis let the skis turn you.

Yep that's the ticket!

Well crafted video and nicely performed demos @tdk6!!
post #23 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrstrat57 View Post

Don't turn the skis let the skis turn you.

Yep that's the ticket!

Well crafted video and nicely performed demos @tdk6!!

 

Thanks. Yes, that great quoting is from a PSIA video I watched a few years ago. In a way its the same with skidded turns. You don't turn the skis, the skis turn you, but when it comes to carving its upmost important to be patient at the top of the turn. Tip the skis on their edges and wait. Its like "he tipped his skis on edge and watch what happened". In skidded turns you are more in direct control of the actual start of the turn. I think this is maybe the most important detail vastly overlooked with carved vs skidded turns. Patience vs action. You often see and hear people argue that you actively "steer" your skis through out the turn when skidding/steering. That there is some sort of active rotation going on. This is not the case if you are not making so called short turns were your upper body remains stable and facing straight down the fall line as your feet and skis are tracking back and forth underneath. Like in bump skiing. There you are applying some active rotary through out the turn but when you make wedge turns, wedge Christies or parallel Christies after the initiation of the turn all you do is just adjust edge angles, weight distribution sideways and fore/aft and some other balancing movements. The active rotary many talk about is really just increasing of the edge angles. That is not rotary to turn the skis. That is rotary of the femurs in the hip sockets that tips the skis that turns the skier.

 

tdktele52 :)

post #24 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

 

I once asked a crusty older PSIA examiner with gray hair and a long respected history in instruction about that proscription against letting the skis leave the snow.  He was catching air from the rebound on every turn, and he was skiing fantastic.  I asked him if he was "grandfathered in."  

 

He chuckled and said nothing.  So I asked more pointedly if the admonition to not let the skis leave the snow was addressed to lower level skiers who were skiing aft and had to pick up the new inside ski to get it out of the way, and he said yes.

 

We know that racers need to keep their skis on the snow for control, but that's not what we are talking about here.  Advanced/expert skiers who want the air between turns because it feels great should be able to do that without worrying about breaking some rule.  That no-air-between-turns-rule applies to instructors in the midst of teaching, because it might mislead their students into thinking they are OK when they ski aft and lift the tips of their new inside ski between turns.

 

Yes, the n-a-b-t-r really doesn't apply to expert skiing. I think its very important for beginners to understand that both skis remain on the snow at all times during skiing to get away from the habit of lifting up one ski in the air and redirecting it instead of guiding both of them on the snow at all times. At expert level the unweighting and jumping should also be done with both skis. Not a sequential progression aka stepping. Even that also has its time and place. No absolutes here :)

post #25 of 62
Hey I was there earthquake day - that was some heavy wet snow. Think we might have been lapping Kandahar at a similar time.
post #26 of 62
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Thanks. Yes, that great quoting is from a PSIA video I watched a few years ago. In a way its the same with skidded turns. You don't turn the skis, the skis turn you, but when it comes to carving its upmost important to be patient at the top of the turn. Tip the skis on their edges and wait. Its like "he tipped his skis on edge and watch what happened". In skidded turns you are more in direct control of the actual start of the turn. I think this is maybe the most important detail vastly overlooked with carved vs skidded turns. Patience vs action. You often see and hear people argue that you actively "steer" your skis through out the turn when skidding/steering. That there is some sort of active rotation going on. This is not the case if you are not making so called short turns were your upper body remains stable and facing straight down the fall line as your feet and skis are tracking back and forth underneath. Like in bump skiing. There you are applying some active rotary through out the turn but when you make wedge turns, wedge Christies or parallel Christies after the initiation of the turn all you do is just adjust edge angles, weight distribution sideways and fore/aft and some other balancing movements. The active rotary many talk about is really just increasing of the edge angles. That is not rotary to turn the skis. That is rotary of the femurs in the hip sockets that tips the skis that turns the skier.

 

tdktele52 :)

 

The fist time skiers do this tip-and-wait thing without adding any muscular rotation to the skis, they just don't know where the skis will turn back in the other direction.  It's a mystery, and can be scary.  

 

I remember very clearly the first time I was successful in avoiding any muscular rotation of the skis.  The trail had a flat beginning, then it turned dramatically to the right (it was called the waterfall) where it dropped steeply for a short bit.  This steep section had a shallow groomer-created snow bank on its outside to help stop skiers from zooming off into the trees.  At the bottom of that drop the trail suddenly flattened (I'd bottomed out and double ejected there in the past), then it made a 90 degree right turn again.  Stupid place to try this, but I was stupid.

 

I tipped and waited as my skis headed across the steep section towards the trees.  My head flooded with fear as it seemed quite possible that the skis would climb over the snow bank and sail into the woods.  Luck was with me and they turned at the very last second, way up on top of the ski bank.  Two turns later I hit the flat bottom making my third carved turn ever and held on for dear life.  The skis were headed straight for the trees, again, but luck loved me that day.  There was no double-ejection, the skis turned right at the edge of the trees, and I cruised to a happy stop with a very high heart rate.   

I offer the story for those reading here who have not yet successfully done that business of tipping and waiting.  Please do try it ... on a wide trail.

post #27 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 
 

I offer the story for those reading here who have not yet successfully done that business of tipping and waiting.  Please do try it ... on a wide trail.

I would say try it on a green trail rather ;)

 

And for instant success: tuck first! That increases the range of tipping 3-fold.

 

:beercheer: 

 

p.s. This is my favorite related quote:

 

"If you stand correctly on your skis, they will turn for you. If you apply correct edge angles and pressure to a ski, the ski itself will provide most of the required turning forces."

How the Racers Ski, Warren Witherell, 1972

post #28 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post



tdktele52 smile.gif

Last year I traded my 74 Gibson Les Paul for a sweet old Gibson ES 335 and I just traded my Baja Tele and a bunch of valuable vintage FX for a 72 Tele Thinline.

My collecting is done!
post #29 of 62

hrstrat57,

 

Just a warning from someone who has sever GAS (guitar accusition syndrome). It's never done.

 

fom

post #30 of 62
 
Originally Posted by razie View Post

 

p.s. This is my favorite related quote:

 

"If you stand correctly on your skis, they will turn for you. If you apply correct edge angles and pressure to a ski, the ski itself will provide most of the required turning forces."

How the Racers Ski, Warren Witherell, 1972

 

I don't know about that quote. It seems the use of the word "correct" makes it meaningless. You could say that about anything:

 

"If you push down on the lever correctly, the toilet will flush and provide all the evacuation forces. If you don't, you will need to get a bucket and do it yourself."

How the Smart Ass Remarks, Rich666, 2016

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