or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How to Wax Skis Basic Waxing

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Here I show basic ski waxing.  Nothing fancy.  You reap what you sow.  I can assure you that it would be a rare "shop" that would take this much time on your skis.

It's just too much time for a 10 to 20 dollar wax job.  Nobody can make any money this way.  Yet I as an independent, I do spend this much time on many skis for real.

This is the advantage of learning to do your own waxing.  You can spend as much time as you like.  If you ski a lot it's a good thing to learn.

Please don't skip ahead when viewing as I talk the whole time and that is also part of the lesson, plus you see in real time just how long it can take to do a good job that will make the wax job last more than just a few days. 

Happy waxing to you!

PS the skis have been brushed out thoroughly prior to this waxing.  Always clean your bases before waxing by brushing with brass at a minimum.  I like to clean first with "Swix Glide Wax Cleaner".  Google that for my video on using that method.
 

 

post #2 of 11

Too much.  Beyond basic.

 

Hold the hot iron above the skis, touch the wax bar to the iron, dribble wax on the ski base.  Iron the wax into the base, never stopping the iron.  Hot enough to melt the wax, not so hot it smokes.  As soon as the entire base is coated (I don't bother with the upturned shovel), remove the excess.  Cool then scrape.  Maybe brush.  Or, get really basic, remelt the wax and wipe the excess off with a paper towel.  Yes, slow out of the starting gate.  Otherwise, the wax is polished on the snow in the first few feet, and I'm off to a great day of skiing.  Agree, not optimum glide.  Do I care?  Uh-uh.  Am I a happy skier?  Uh-huh.  I like Hertel Super Hot Sauce universal wax.  Every other brand has some who like that brand.

 

Asking the best way to wax is like asking the best brand of tires, or best beer, or best ski wax, or....there often isn't one right answer.

post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
 

Too much.  Beyond basic.

 

Hold the hot iron above the skis, touch the wax bar to the iron, dribble wax on the ski base.  Iron the wax into the base, never stopping the iron.  Hot enough to melt the wax, not so hot it smokes.  As soon as the entire base is coated (I don't bother with the upturned shovel), remove the excess.  Cool then scrape.  Maybe brush.  Or, get really basic, remelt the wax and wipe the excess off with a paper towel.  Yes, slow out of the starting gate.  Otherwise, the wax is polished on the snow in the first few feet, and I'm off to a great day of skiing.  Agree, not optimum glide.  Do I care?  Uh-uh.  Am I a happy skier?  Uh-huh.  I like Hertel Super Hot Sauce universal wax.  Every other brand has some who like that brand.

 

Asking the best way to wax is like asking the best brand of tires, or best beer, or best ski wax, or....there often isn't one right answer.


Yes and no.  On the one hand, agree that a basic wax does not need to be that detailed.  On the other hand, the written description above would not have been nearly enough to encourage me to buy basic stuff and start waxing my own skis about ten years ago.  I read about waxing for a while lurking on ski forums.  But what helped the most was watching a friend in person and then using his set up to wax skis that weren't new.  Had I come across Jacque's video back then, I would've found it very useful.

post #4 of 11

A 39 minute video on ski waxing?  Holy cow!

post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
 

A 39 minute video on ski waxing?  Holy cow!


Well, he does spend the first 8 minutes measuring the temperature of the iron. :rolleyes

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
 

A 39 minute video on ski waxing?  Holy cow!


Ha ha.  Yea, lots of time messing around with the temperature probe!  :rolleyes

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
 

Too much.  Beyond basic.

 

Hold the hot iron above the skis, touch the wax bar to the iron, dribble wax on the ski base.  Iron the wax into the base, never stopping the iron.  Hot enough to melt the wax, not so hot it smokes.  As soon as the entire base is coated (I don't bother with the upturned shovel), remove the excess.  Cool then scrape.  Maybe brush.  Or, get really basic, remelt the wax and wipe the excess off with a paper towel.  Yes, slow out of the starting gate.  Otherwise, the wax is polished on the snow in the first few feet, and I'm off to a great day of skiing.  Agree, not optimum glide.  Do I care?  Uh-uh.  Am I a happy skier?  Uh-huh.  I like Hertel Super Hot Sauce universal wax.  Every other brand has some who like that brand.

 

Asking the best way to wax is like asking the best brand of tires, or best beer, or best ski wax, or....there often isn't one right answer.


Yes.  Here is beyond basic to some degree.

post #8 of 11

This may be a dumb question, but is there anything that needs to been done to a brand new pair of ski's before waxing?

After skiing for 6 seasons have have recently purchased a new pair of ski's and I want to lean to wax them myself. Thanks

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiVibes View Post
 

This may be a dumb question, but is there anything that needs to been done to a brand new pair of ski's before waxing?

After skiing for 6 seasons have have recently purchased a new pair of ski's and I want to lean to wax them myself. Thanks


I like to tune and base prepare any new ski I get before it hits the snow.   

Here is how i do that.

post #10 of 11

Thanks for the video Jacques.

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiVibes View Post
 

Thanks for the video Jacques.


Vibes!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs