or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Need help with ski/setup

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

 

I have been skiing at lift serviced resorts for sometime. Now I'm ready to broaden my horizon. I was wondering how I could use the gear I already have. I did some research and came up with the following two options regarding equipment. Please review the options and let me know if they make sense. My budget is fairly limited but I'd like something I can work and grow with. Please let me know if you have any other related suggestions.

 

1. Use my existing Salomon 1080 mogul skis, buy AT binding (used or new, like Fritschi Diamir Freeride) that'll accept my Rossignol Alltrack Pro 130 boots. I'm not really sure if I need to drill ski tip holes.

 

2. Buy another set of back-country skis with AT binding.

 

Of course, the first option makes better economic sense but I'm not really sure how well my mogul skis will work in the back country.

 

In addition I'll also have to buy telescopic poles and skins.

 

Thanks,

Kal

post #2 of 18

Where do you plan to ski?

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

Immediate goal is to ski Tuckerman's Ravine in NH. 

post #4 of 18
You can skip the telescopic pole (unless you have 'park skier poles'), I would say you would be best off with a wider ski than a 1080 Mogul... that is an awfully narrow ski. Obviously you do need skins, but maybe you can score a used ski/ binding/ skin that someone else is upgrading? The natural progression is alpine ski with frame binding-> lighter weight touring ski and tech binding... those upgrading don't usually keep the old rig.
post #5 of 18

If you plan to ski tuckerman, then you should be planning on late April onward.  Even then the avalanche forecast should be checked and do not go any place that is not a low rating.  For these purposes, just get a pack that can hold your skis and boots and a good pair of hiking boots.  Head up with the masses and make sure to bring a helmet as there are many projectiles.  Without avalanche training, equipment and partners you will be limited to the Spring corn cycle and this has been done for years with alpine gear. 

post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ki8um View Post
 

Hi all,

 

I have been skiing at lift serviced resorts for sometime. Now I'm ready to broaden my horizon. I was wondering how I could use the gear I already have. I did some research and came up with the following two options regarding equipment. Please review the options and let me know if they make sense. My budget is fairly limited but I'd like something I can work and grow with. Please let me know if you have any other related suggestions.

 

1. Use my existing Salomon 1080 mogul skis, buy AT binding (used or new, like Fritschi Diamir Freeride) that'll accept my Rossignol Alltrack Pro 130 boots. I'm not really sure if I need to drill ski tip holes.

 

2. Buy another set of back-country skis with AT binding.

 

Of course, the first option makes better economic sense but I'm not really sure how well my mogul skis will work in the back country.

 

In addition I'll also have to buy telescopic poles and skins.

 

Thanks,

Kal


How old are those 1080s?  Do they have any grip, as in torsional rigidity?  Or are they noodles?
I have an old pair of 1080s.  They are worthless when it comes to gripping snow.  I won't take them out any more, anywhere.

They would be really inadequate for Tuckerman.

 

You can hike up the Tuckerman Trail with ski boots and skis strapped onto your backpack.  

Micro-spikes on your hiking boots will give you grip on the icy trail.  

There's no need to buy AT gear to get up there.  Most people don't skin up.

But hey, maybe you aren't just focusing on Tuckerman.  Tell us about that. 

 

Your skis need to be able to handle snow in different stages in the bowl itself.  You might get all corn, if you're lucky.

But you might hit harder snow in the shadows of the bowl and it won't be bumped up either.

It could be anything as far as conditions go, because weather can come in rather quickly and change the snow.  

Your skis need to be able to handle that.  

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

How old are those 1080s?  Do they have any grip, as in torsional rigidity?  Or are they noodles?
I have an old pair of 1080s.  They are worthless when it comes to gripping snow. 

Do you have a 1080 or a 1080 Mogul? They are different skis. The 1080 Mogul is a competition mogul ski, 65mm waist.

post #8 of 18

Whoops.  Riiiight.  Mine are not mogul skis.

post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies.

 

My skis are 1080 moguls. I'm not sure how old they are since they were hand me downs. They grip okay in harder snow but doesn't turn as well as my other skis.

 

My other skis are Elan Ripsticks. They're 2-3 year old. They are simply awesome on groomed terrain and hold in hard packed snow like a boss! The problem with those skis are that they bounce around too much on bumpy surfaces, moguls and trees.

 

Both skis are narrow.

 

I've hiked up the Tuckerman's Ravine trail last year. I probably won't be able to use AT bindings up that trail.

 

However, I'm going for avalanche training in March. They want us to bring something with AT bindings (or Telemark). I'm not sure where they're taking us.

 

Also, I cross-country skied the last couple of years at a park near us and enjoyed that. I figured using a frame AT binding on an older ski would be a good way to start combining the two sports and hopefully get out of lift service resorts. Eventually, perhaps add a good all weather tent and sleeping bag to the rest of the camping gear and...but that's years down the road :)

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ki8um View Post
 

[...]

I've hiked up the Tuckerman's Ravine trail last year. I probably won't be able to use AT bindings up that trail.

 

However, I'm going for avalanche training in March. They want us to bring something with AT bindings (or Telemark). I'm not sure where they're taking us.

[...]

 

The typical avalanche safety class based out of Mount Washington will end up poking around a little bit lower down in Tuckerman Ravine.

 

If the course provider specifies that students must have skinning setups, then you'll be skinning up the Tuckerman Ravine Trail to treeline, i.e., Hermit Lake.

 

From there, anyone who is skilled at skinning can continue skinning all the way to the base of Tuckerman Ravine.

But a class will usually just hike from treeline to the bowl.

 

(Alternatively, you could ask the course provider instead of posting here...)

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

You can skip the telescopic pole (unless you have 'park skier poles'), I would say you would be best off with a wider ski than a 1080 Mogul... that is an awfully narrow ski. Obviously you do need skins, but maybe you can score a used ski/ binding/ skin that someone else is upgrading? The natural progression is alpine ski with frame binding-> lighter weight touring ski and tech binding... those upgrading don't usually keep the old rig.

The cross country ski poles were much longer. I thought you needed longer poles to use your arms. Don't you?

 

I was thinking the same thing about getting a used set. I would like to go with a frame binding for now to be able to use my regular boots. I'll switch to a lighter setup when I find more time for this kinda thing and have more knowledge and experience.

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post
 

If you plan to ski tuckerman, then you should be planning on late April onward.  Even then the avalanche forecast should be checked and do not go any place that is not a low rating.  For these purposes, just get a pack that can hold your skis and boots and a good pair of hiking boots.  Head up with the masses and make sure to bring a helmet as there are many projectiles.  Without avalanche training, equipment and partners you will be limited to the Spring corn cycle and this has been done for years with alpine gear. 

I went and looked at the place last May. It looked great but I just hiked. It's safer to get some training first :)

post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 


How old are those 1080s?  Do they have any grip, as in torsional rigidity?  Or are they noodles?
I have an old pair of 1080s.  They are worthless when it comes to gripping snow.  I won't take them out any more, anywhere.

They would be really inadequate for Tuckerman.

 

You can hike up the Tuckerman Trail with ski boots and skis strapped onto your backpack.  

Micro-spikes on your hiking boots will give you grip on the icy trail.  

There's no need to buy AT gear to get up there.  Most people don't skin up.

But hey, maybe you aren't just focusing on Tuckerman.  Tell us about that. 

 

Your skis need to be able to handle snow in different stages in the bowl itself.  You might get all corn, if you're lucky.

But you might hit harder snow in the shadows of the bowl and it won't be bumped up either.

It could be anything as far as conditions go, because weather can come in rather quickly and change the snow.  

Your skis need to be able to handle that.  

The 1080 moguls I have are old. But I can carve with them with some difficulty. So I think they'll hold but from all the responses I think I'd be better off with something wider.

 

Tuckerman seemed like a natural progression from aggressive alpine skiing. I have a friend who's doing it with me. He doesn't like hiking and has not interest in ski touring in future. I, on the other hand, have backpacked in a former life and loved it. I think it would be awesome to add a little skiing and adverse cold weather to the mix!

post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Shefftz View Post
 

 

The typical avalanche safety class based out of Mount Washington will end up poking around a little bit lower down in Tuckerman Ravine.

 

If the course provider specifies that students must have skinning setups, then you'll be skinning up the Tuckerman Ravine Trail to treeline, i.e., Hermit Lake.

 

From there, anyone who is skilled at skinning can continue skinning all the way to the base of Tuckerman Ravine.

But a class will usually just hike from treeline to the bowl.

 

(Alternatively, you could ask the course provider instead of posting here...)

The website listed AT binding or Telemark with skin as gears needed. I called the course last week and they told me it's optional, but I can rent everything from them. I'm not entirely keen on renting, however. I'd rather put the money towards used equipment. I know I'd like to get into this sport.

post #15 of 18
Quote:

[...] The cross country ski poles were much longer. I thought you needed longer poles to use your arms. Don't you?  [...]

 

The optimum pole length for efficient skinning is about the very least of your concerns at this stage.

But for the record, adjustable poles are useful since you can set the length to about xc "classic" for skinning, varying lengths for skiing depending on the pitch (i.e., steeper = shorter), differential left<>right for extended traversing skintracks, and as short as possible for hiking/booting.

(For "skimo" racing we use what are essentially modified xc race poles, at slightly below xc classic length, then just deal with the absurdly long lengths for the descents and the bootpacks.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ki8um View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Shefftz View Post
 

 

The typical avalanche safety class based out of Mount Washington will end up poking around a little bit lower down in Tuckerman Ravine.

 

If the course provider specifies that students must have skinning setups, then you'll be skinning up the Tuckerman Ravine Trail to treeline, i.e., Hermit Lake.

 

From there, anyone who is skilled at skinning can continue skinning all the way to the base of Tuckerman Ravine.

But a class will usually just hike from treeline to the bowl.

 

(Alternatively, you could ask the course provider instead of posting here...)

The website listed AT binding or Telemark with skin as gears needed. I called the course last week and they told me it's optional, but I can rent everything from them. I'm not entirely keen on renting, however. I'd rather put the money towards used equipment. I know I'd like to get into this sport.

 

Renting skis with a frame-style binding for use with your own boots might be a helpful experiment (i.e., to determine whether you're willing to put up with the misery of such a setup).

 

Alternatively, since the second day of your course will probably have some sort of short field day (as opposed to the full field day on the third day of the course), perhaps you could use such a sidecountry setup on that partial field day.  Then the second day you could rent a real touring setup (i.e., with Dynafit or similar "Tech"-style bindings) and see the difference.

 

And who is "them"?  I can think of only two course providers who have a rental fleet.

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Shefftz View Post
 

 

The optimum pole length for efficient skinning is about the very least of your concerns at this stage.

But for the record, adjustable poles are useful since you can set the length to about xc "classic" for skinning, varying lengths for skiing depending on the pitch (i.e., steeper = shorter), differential left<>right for extended traversing skintracks, and as short as possible for hiking/booting.

(For "skimo" racing we use what are essentially modified xc race poles, at slightly below xc classic length, then just deal with the absurdly long lengths for the descents and the bootpacks.)

 

Renting skis with a frame-style binding for use with your own boots might be a helpful experiment (i.e., to determine whether you're willing to put up with the misery of such a setup).

 

Alternatively, since the second day of your course will probably have some sort of short field day (as opposed to the full field day on the third day of the course), perhaps you could use such a sidecountry setup on that partial field day.  Then the second day you could rent a real touring setup (i.e., with Dynafit or similar "Tech"-style bindings) and see the difference.

 

And who is "them"?  I can think of only two course providers who have a rental fleet.

"Them" is EMS.

post #17 of 18

Out of curiosity, how long are your 1080 Moguls and how much do you weigh?

post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Out of curiosity, how long are your 1080 Moguls and how much do you weigh?

Those skis are 170cm. I weigh 137lbs.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home