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Loaded vs unloaded weight and DIN settings

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

So in these waning days before the ski season begins and we'll all actually be outside and not bickering on a forum, I had a random thought...

 

 

 

When weighing yourself to set the DIN on your skis, should you use your everyday weight, or your weight when you're in boots and all your gear?  You could be 130 lbs in street clothes, 140 with boots and gear, and 150 with all your gear, plus a pack full of random things right?

post #2 of 11
Very interesting question. Do charts assume some constant for gear - keep in mind that typical fall indoor clothing and street shoes weigh 5-8 lbs, would triple that for ski gear, helmet, boots, parka etc - or should we make the correction ourselves? I have a different DIN if I add 20 lbs to my scale weight...
post #3 of 11

With gear.  It's the total weight he binding is expected to retain.

post #4 of 11

Nope, the chart is based on body mass index, it is looking for the weight a physician would use- naked. (you being naked, not the physician... that would be weird).

post #5 of 11

Release settings were developed from research on cadavers.  They weighed the cadavers naked; they didn't dress them up in ski outfits.  :cool  Weight is used as an indicator of bone strength.  

The real question is once you have your weight (and height and boot sole length), do you decide your risk tolerance is 3, 3+ or 3++?:dunno

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

Nope, the chart is based on body mass index, it is looking for the weight a physician would use- naked. (you being naked, not the physician... that would be weird).


I stand corrected!!  :o

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

Nope, the chart is based on body mass index, it is looking for the weight a physician would use- naked. (you being naked, not the physician... that would be weird).

 

That makes sense.  When I rent demo skis, the form asks for height and weight, along with age and Type (I/II/III).  I've always put down what I weigh in street clothes.  I can't imagine that renters who don't own skis would write down any other weight.

 

Of course, what I had to do after age 50 was decide how to end up with the right DIN.  Usually enough to specify Type III+.  Understand the thinking behind changing the DIN for older skiers but there is no way that one age makes sense for everyone.  In my case, I'm stronger and a more advanced skier at 60 than ten years ago.

post #8 of 11

Binding tech manuals provide the guidance that "the release values at toe and heel should be determined by height and body weight (ISO/ASTM) method."

 

Chart settings are based on body weight, with an allowance for basic equipment weight.

 

Fine print notes that these basic chart settings may not be suitable for all skiers, or all target environments, and there are suggestions for accommodations for both lower and higher settings than the basic chart recommendation.

 

You should let your shop tech know your actual body weight, and then other details that might lead you to a request for a higher setting, e.g. spending most of your time carrying a 20 lb. pack.

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Release settings were developed from research on cadavers.  They weighed the cadavers naked; they didn't dress them up in ski outfits.  :cool  Weight is used as an indicator of bone strength.  

The real question is once you have your weight (and height and boot sole length), do you decide your risk tolerance is 3, 3+ or 3++?:dunno

You're wrong. My cadaver, at least, will be dressed in ski clothes. There's probably only room in the casket for one pair of skis though. Which will it be?

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

You're wrong. My cadaver, at least, will be dressed in ski clothes. There's probably only room in the casket for one pair of skis though. Which will it be?

 

 

Obviously it'll be whatever the popular ski du jour is. If it had been 2012, it would have been something by Kastle, 2013, the Bonafide, 2014-2015 I wasn't paying attention, and this year it's the Nordica Enforcer...

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingFish View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

You're wrong. My cadaver, at least, will be dressed in ski clothes. There's probably only room in the casket for one pair of skis though. Which will it be?

 

 

Obviously it'll be whatever the popular ski du jour is. If it had been 2012, it would have been something by Kastle, 2013, the Bonafide, 2014-2015 I wasn't paying attention, and this year it's the Nordica Enforcer...

or maybe the ski that kills me

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