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Rent vs Old Equipment - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cward View Post
 

haha - totally agree. Not looking to pinch pennies, does it make sense to put a beginner in demo ski's though? It seems like that may be overshooting the runway in the opposite direction no? I planned to put her in a normal ski package.. every place i've looked seems to have base, performance, demo package. If everyone thinks I should put her in demo then I will, I just thought that may not be ideal either?


My friends who rent at Alta Ski Shop get the regular package.  Much better than anything you've ever seen in the southeast.  I'm thinking about the boots since that's what makes the most difference.

post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cward View Post
 

haha - totally agree. Not looking to pinch pennies, does it make sense to put a beginner in demo ski's though? It seems like that may be overshooting the runway in the opposite direction no? I planned to put her in a normal ski package.. every place i've looked seems to have base, performance, demo package. If everyone thinks I should put her in demo then I will, I just thought that may not be ideal either?

 

I work at a on mountain demo centre and i recommend standard rentals to first year skiers only, although lots of intermediates rent and enjoy them.

 

My suggestion is to start out with the standard rentals and then ask her ski instructor after the first lesson for an opinion on whether it is worthwhile for her to upgrade based on her initial progress.

post #33 of 46
Thread Starter 

thanks guys, really appreciate all the input

post #34 of 46

I'm glad the conversation started mentioning boots. Boots are the most critical piece of equipment you have. Take as much time as possible getting boots fitted. If your arriving on Sunday and plan on skiing Monday go to the shop Sunday afternoon and go through the fitting process. It would be good to have your wife spend at least 15 minutes walking around the shop in the boots she thinks she likes. She should expect them to be tight and when she first puts them on her toes might pinch in the front. Once flexed the toes should move back and she should be able to wiggle them. If she puts the rental boots on for the first time and they feel like slippers and her toes are not pushing the front before she flexes they are too big. After walking around for 15 minutes the boots should loosen up and any pressure points should show up. This is a lot better than having issues show up two hours into her first day at the top of the mountain with no way to adjust things. Spend lots and lots of time on the boots.

 

As for skis, no one has mentioned approximate sizes. Your wife is 172 cm tall. Since she is a never-ever start her on something around 160 the first day, no I'm not kidding, that short. An example would be a Rossignol Temptation 84 at 162.

As or yourself, your 187 cm tall, with todays shaped skis I think you would want to start around 177 cm. As an example, a Rossignol Experience 88 at 180 cm would be a great ski for you. A good powder ski you can find in rental shops, as a 'demo', is a Rossignol Soul 7; the longest length they list available is 188. Skis have changes a whole lot since 2003.

The great thing about renting is being able to swap skis every day if you want to.

 

I'm listing a shop web site as an example. Breeze Ski Rentals has a shop at I-80 and S. Foothill Drive. Breeze is typically associated with Park City. https://www.skirentals.com/#!/product/213

They have a 'Performance' package for $48.99 that includes boots, skis and a helmet. (Everyone wears a helmet today, you probably didn't in 2003.)

Their Sport ski package is $36.99 per day, this is where your wife should start.

You can then move up to a 'Demo' package as you feel comfortable.

This is just an example. There are a lot of great rental shops around Salt Lake City. Try to find one that's willing to spend time to get your wife fitted correctly.

 

To give you a little reference, I'm a Level 1 instructor, 5ft - 9in tall (175 cm) weighing 175 lbs. My daily driver is a Head iMagnum at 163 cm. My teaching ski for beginner lessons is a 140 cm. When I go out west I always rent something between 175 and 180 cm. However I take my own boots. I wear a size 11A mens street shoe, I have skinny, flat feet. My ski boot is a size 26.5 which translates to about a size 9 shoe. My wife wears a size 7.5 street shoe and her boots are a size 26.5; she has a wide foot with a high instep. Spend as much time getting the boots right as possible. The skis are really a little less important.

 

i hope your wife has a great time learning the great sport of skiing.

post #35 of 46
I remember being on the base/beginner rentals when just starting out and just never feeling like I could get enough edge especially on firm groomers if it had been several days in between storms. Another complaint I had was that they felt twitchy, not very stable, and definitely not confidence inspiring if I wanted to push my beginner abilities a little at the end of the day and run bases flat down a wide open green or easy blue slope. Finally, a lot of those base rentals had flat tails which didn't release easily, especially if you were intimidated already and in the back seat.

Going up to the demos, especially with something with some tip and tail rocker, was just eye-opening how much easier to link turns and confidence inspiring everything became. Now it could be that the base rentals see a lot more miles on them than demos, and the edges weren't maintained as well, to account for my beginner experiences. But once I sprung for the demos I never looked back.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cward View Post

haha - totally agree. Not looking to pinch pennies, does it make sense to put a beginner in demo ski's though? It seems like that may be overshooting the runway in the opposite direction no? I planned to put her in a normal ski package.. every place i've looked seems to have base, performance, demo package. If everyone thinks I should put her in demo then I will, I just thought that may not be ideal either?
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by blah123 View Post

I remember being on the base/beginner rentals when just starting out and just never feeling like I could get enough edge especially on firm groomers if it had been several days in between storms. Another complaint I had was that they felt twitchy, not very stable, and definitely not confidence inspiring if I wanted to push my beginner abilities a little at the end of the day and run bases flat down a wide open green or easy blue slope. Finally, a lot of those base rentals had flat tails which didn't release easily, especially if you were intimidated already and in the back seat.

Going up to the demos, especially with something with some tip and tail rocker, was just eye-opening how much easier to link turns and confidence inspiring everything became. Now it could be that the base rentals see a lot more miles on them than demos, and the edges weren't maintained as well, to account for my beginner experiences. But once I sprung for the demos I never looked back.

Out of curiosity, what region did you learn to ski in?  Were you at a destination resort of more of a locals' mountain?

post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

Out of curiosity, what region did you learn to ski in?  Were you at a destination resort of more of a locals' mountain?

1st time ever skiing at whister. 2nd time at jackson hole. Hiking and snowshoeing trips turned into skiing outings at the insistence of friends I was staying with. Good thing I listened to them. ;-)
post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by blah123 View Post

I remember being on the base/beginner rentals when just starting out and just never feeling like I could get enough edge especially on firm groomers if it had been several days in between storms. Another complaint I had was that they felt twitchy, not very stable, and definitely not confidence inspiring if I wanted to push my beginner abilities a little at the end of the day and run bases flat down a wide open green or easy blue slope. Finally, a lot of those base rentals had flat tails which didn't release easily, especially if you were intimidated already and in the back seat.

Going up to the demos, especially with something with some tip and tail rocker, was just eye-opening how much easier to link turns and confidence inspiring everything became. Now it could be that the base rentals see a lot more miles on them than demos, and the edges weren't maintained as well, to account for my beginner experiences. But once I sprung for the demos I never looked back.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cward View Post

haha - totally agree. Not looking to pinch pennies, does it make sense to put a beginner in demo ski's though? It seems like that may be overshooting the runway in the opposite direction no? I planned to put her in a normal ski package.. every place i've looked seems to have base, performance, demo package. If everyone thinks I should put her in demo then I will, I just thought that may not be ideal either?


There's a reason to get beginner skis for beginners.  They turn easily.  One of the most perplexing never-ever lessons I taught last year was a woman, mid-thirties, athletic, who just could not get a turn to happen.  There seemed to be no reason for that.  I noticed that she was on twin-tips, but I didn't notice much more about them.  Later I checked in the rental shop and saw those skis.  They had no camber, and hardly any sidecut.  Beginner skis have both.  She must have gotten a demo package instead of the beginner package, and must have chosen these skis because of the graphics.  I think it was the skis that caused her so much difficulty.  

 

Choose beginner skis for beginners.  And rent boots that really fit.  It's possible, blah123, that your twitchy skis were twitching because your boots were not snug enough.  Boots are part of the skis, after all, once clicked in.   If the foot wobbles inside the boot, the ski wobbles.

post #39 of 46
Spell check. Whistler.

I remember learning to ski my 2nd time out at jackson hole, looking down a blue run and thinking, "this is a blue? You have got to be kidding me." Good times.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blah123 View Post

1st time ever skiing at whister. 2nd time at jackson hole. Hiking and snowshoeing trips turned into skiing outings at the insistence of friends I was staying with. Good thing I listened to them. ;-)
post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by blah123 View Post

Spell check. Whistler.

I remember learning to ski my 2nd time out at jackson hole, looking down a blue run and thinking, "this is a blue? You have got to be kidding me." Good times.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blah123 View Post

1st time ever skiing at whister. 2nd time at jackson hole. Hiking and snowshoeing trips turned into skiing outings at the insistence of friends I was staying with. Good thing I listened to them. ;-)

Exactly the reason why the OP is being smart and taking the wife to Alta first, not Snowbird.  I stayed away from JH until I was a solid advanced skier.  Steep can be fun, but certainly can be intimidating for a relative new skier.

 

You got started at some of the best places.  :D 

post #41 of 46
Thread Starter 
We're def going to rent

Demo for me, mid level for her and then will upgrade to demo for her if/when she picks it up this trip... we will spend ample time trying on boots to make sure they are well fitted

Yea helmets were lame circa 2003, I plan to buy a smith helmet prior to going. Not lame anymore and def feel differently now that I have two little ones
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cward View Post

We're def going to rent

Demo for me, mid level for her and then will upgrade to demo for her if/when she picks it up this trip... we will spend ample time trying on boots to make sure they are well fitted

Yea helmets were lame circa 2003, I plan to buy a smith helmet prior to going. Not lame anymore and def feel differently now that I have two little ones

 

If your boots are still in decent shape you can absolutely still use them. 

 

Helmets are a good call.

post #43 of 46
Quote:
 

I plan to buy a smith helmet prior to going.

 

And don't forget to take your goggles with you when shopping for that new helmet.

post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cward View Post

We're def going to rent

Demo for me, mid level for her and then will upgrade to demo for her if/when she picks it up this trip... we will spend ample time trying on boots to make sure they are well fitted

Yea helmets were lame circa 2003, I plan to buy a smith helmet prior to going. Not lame anymore and def feel differently now that I have two little ones


i know it goes against some of what's been said here, but just when you get into SLC there's Level Nine Sports, that has great stuff at stupid good prices. Don't know why you said you're going to buy a Smith helmet - do you know that fits your noggin best? Anyway, the prices will astound you, and it's on your way anyway, so stop in (and maybe even look at new boots at excellent pricing)

post #45 of 46

If you're going to hopefully ski for 10 years, some comfortable well fitting boots, whether new or used will provide priceless pleasure, and some used demo skis will set you back about $500.  Even with a time value component you'll break even over 10 years.

post #46 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
 


i know it goes against some of what's been said here, but just when you get into SLC there's Level Nine Sports, that has great stuff at stupid good prices. Don't know why you said you're going to buy a Smith helmet - do you know that fits your noggin best? Anyway, the prices will astound you, and it's on your way anyway, so stop in (and maybe even look at new boots at excellent pricing)


and 2nd tracks salt lake. they have fantastic prices.

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