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Loveland

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Why does there not seem to be not too much for Loveland?  I don't hear anything bad about it, but for sure it seems to be a second tier resort compared to the other CO resorts.  I'm very likely be in a CO 1st weekend of Feb skiing 2 days, one day at Copper and have skied all the other big front range resorts except for Keystone and Loveland.  I looked at the L trail map and it seems big enough at 1800 acres and black/double runs.  Is Loveland a better choice than Keystone to feel some gravity?

post #2 of 19

I'll vouch for Loveland. It has very legit terrain. Huge steep bowls and I would imagine the snow stays pretty good up there due to the wind blowing snow in and the high elevation. The key would be viz. If its a storm day with low viz the Luv would be significantly impacted. Never could understand why the Luv doesn't get more love, maybe the slow lifts?

post #3 of 19
A-Basin gets way move love on here than Loveland, and I don't think it's deserved. I've skied 9 CO resorts and I'd put Luv in the top half... Maybe top 3. The lifts are so but so are AB's. The difference is most of Luv's lifts are steep, so that makes for the speed. Only Pali does this at AB. The terrain was fun for our advanced group and conditions were great compared to the other places we went to.
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
 

Why does there not seem to be not too much for Loveland?  I don't hear anything bad about it, but for sure it seems to be a second tier resort compared to the other CO resorts. 

 

Is Loveland a better choice than Keystone to feel some gravity?

Between Loveland and Keystone? No brainer, Loveland. 

 

Keystone is also just a second tier resort after all. 

post #5 of 19
Keystone second tier? Everyone is always saying how great it is. For me, I've never wanted to go due to their lack of natural snow.
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

I might be passing by Loveland today, depending on our touring route.  I have a daughter out here in Denver and that has given me the chance to visit CO a couple times per year and I've been picking through the resorts and 14ers too.  So far I like Winter Park the best. A-Basin not so much.  Maybe because it was a super cold day or the slow lifts.  It didn't seem I could get that sustained pitch. 

post #7 of 19

Ultra long (2k-3k') sustained pitch is not something you'll really get at Loveland, but several chairs provide a good 1000' of vertical.  I like it because it's cheap (transferrable 4-packs), often has very respectable conditions, plenty enough terrain for a day or two, and is convenient to Denver.  As an Easterner I enjoy the expansive, above tree line feel of much of Loveland, but locals bemoan the frequent high winds of that terrain.  I like pretty much everywhere in CO including Keystone.  I think Keystone has some very decent sustained pitch.  Dercum (2300' vertical), North Peak and Outback (~1500' vertical each) all have excellent high speed lifts for logging tons of vert in a day.  Neither Keystone or Loveland have much of the cliffy, super high angle runs in abundance in plain view like Snowbird, but there is a bit if you know where to look. Or you go to A-Basin for that.

 

Pictures from a great couple of days at Loveland (although these don't show much of Chair 1 with the best sustained steeps):  http://www.epicski.com/a/loveland-co-a-pictorial

Nice scenes from springtime at Keystone:  http://www.epicski.com/a/keystone-co-a-pictorial

A-Basin pics:  http://www.epicski.com/a/arapahoe-basin-co-a-pictorial

post #8 of 19

Loveland has a devoted following of locals/old hand Denverites, slanted towards exploration powder and also steep powder.  Its lack of visibility on blizzard days means that on the "day after" it has fresh tracks often.  "The Ridge" at Loveland  (~13,050' summit) is long, high and open, great powder terrain when visibility allows it, and when the wind is moderate.

 

It's also a favorite for early and late season.

 

Plus it's close and cheap for Denver.    

post #9 of 19

P.S.  That Ridge highpoint counts as a ranked 13,000' peak, informally named "Golden Bear" or "Golden Boy," variously.   When running, the snowcat takes you out almost as far as that highpoint. Some good terrain.  

post #10 of 19
I live in Denver area and most of my friends get luv season passes. Less crowds and better snow than many other resorts, no frills- park next to the lift and get after it. Copper is my other favorite mountain. Good choices.
post #11 of 19

LL is okay....the best steeps are off Chair 1 and are in plain view. 

Visibility is always questionable, and there are some huge flats above treeline, which can sneak up on you on the low light days. 

The wind is feast or famine. Some areas get stripped clean, some get loaded up. You'll usually get both on the same run. 

For years, they've dragged their feet to open quality terrain in a timely matter. 

I'd take it over Keystone, but that's not saying much. 

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by COBillsFan View Post

I'd take it over Keystone, but that's not saying much. 
That's also my feeling. Terrain-wise, Keystone being the last on my list among all the Front range mountains.

Loveland has several deals to make it a cheaper option than all the other, even in holiday period. Less crowded too.
post #13 of 19
For gravity and steeps- Loveland any day over Keystone 😁
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
 

Why does there not seem to be not too much for Loveland?  I don't hear anything bad about it, but for sure it seems to be a second tier resort compared to the other CO resorts.  I'm very likely be in a CO 1st weekend of Feb skiing 2 days, one day at Copper and have skied all the other big front range resorts except for Keystone and Loveland.  I looked at the L trail map and it seems big enough at 1800 acres and black/double runs.  Is Loveland a better choice than Keystone to feel some gravity?

 

I should have mentioned, I found Loveland the most Snowbird-ish of the I-70 resorts, on a way smaller scale vert wise.  Using your terminology, there are a lot of nooks and crannies to find. 


Edited by JoeSchmoe - 10/13/16 at 6:16am
post #15 of 19

I learned to ski at Loveland Basin in 1967 and skied there a lot until I moved to Oregon in 1980.  It is very windy and cold -- similar to A-Basin which I also skied a lot, even after they built the Eisenhower tunnel.   It has some nice steep slots, bowls and long cruiser runs.  The lift system still (in 2015) is substandard compared to other resorts in Colorado.  This can be a blessing because then the runs are not crowded (but the liftlines might be).   There is no lodging nearby.  The closest "town" is Georgetown.  Without lodging at the base it cannot be a destination resort.   If I still lived in Denver, I would still ski Loveland a lot.  But being in Denver means also going to Winter Park, Copper Mountain, A-Basin.....

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post
 

 

I should have mentioned, I found Loveland the most Snowbird-ish of the I-90 resorts, on a way smaller scale vert wise.  Using your terminology, there are a lot of nooks and crannies to find. 

Of course, you mean I-70.

post #17 of 19

No lift lines at Loveland, partly because it's not part of the Epic Pass herd.   A Basin sometimes suffers because it is, loosely.   Copper, as you probably know, also gets shorter lines, often, because it's not.

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by pchewn View Post

Of course, you mean I-70.
fixed it
post #19 of 19

I skied Loveland for the first time in early May this year, and it definitely ranks in my alltime top-5 for in-bound ski days. It was a snowy Friday with around 6 inches of fresh snow at the base, and wind blown to nearly a foot on the ridge by the afternoon. There were maybe a hundred people on the entire mountain. Visibility up high was limited because of the storm, but it wasn't windy and the cat was running. There is no additional charge for the cat, and for most of the day I was the only person riding it. The driver would just wait for me, lap after lap. The runs off the ridge, especially the far end of the ridge, were beautiful and often quite steep, and I saw no one's tracks but my own all afternoon. It was a magical day, under an hour from Denver, and all for a ~$50 spring lift ticket.

 

Keystone is nothing special in my opinion. It's sprawling, crowded, and corporate feeling, and most of the terrain is pretty boring. Keystone's ridge, like LL's, has the most interesting challenging terrain on the mountain, but Keystone's cat is $10 per ride and frankly LL's ridgeline is higher, broader and more varied.

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