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Ski Pole length question? along with decision on what ones to buy

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 

Well i am a good skier with a racing background - 189cm 6'3 or just under tall and about 98kg or 216lbs. I ski everything but these will be my good poles so used for trips to SLC and France, skiing everything from deep POW days, bumps and icy piste. I have skied using 130cm and 125cm poles and my last two sets have been 125cm. I have a thing that once a set bends its time to buy a new pair, normally go Scott Team Issue but been looking into poles and length etc and now stuck in two mind as to what length - i have searched older threads on here regarding length and seems the general gist is to go short and i always have.

 

 

then you get these charts 

 

http://www.evo.com/guides/ski-pole-size-chart

 

No dire rush on my decision but i have narrowed it down to three poles -

 

SRS grip Scott Team Issue currently have these in 125cm

https://www.scott-sports.com/us/en/products/244359/SCOTT-Team-Issue-Ski-Pole/

 

Trigger S Leki Venom SL

https://www.leki.com/uk/product-area/alpine-skiing/poles/2587/venom-sl/

 

or go adjustable Atomic Backland FR

https://shop.atomic.com/en-gb/products/backland-fr-AJ0109.html

 

Now what length do i go for? what poles? 


Edited by scottydonald - 10/8/16 at 7:04am
post #2 of 31

I like adjustable poles--I'm 6' (this forum has strict rules against using metric system) and use 120cm on the groomed and bumps, 125-130 for soft snow, max them out for long climbs and skates.


Edited by oldgoat - 10/8/16 at 7:39pm
post #3 of 31
Wow- I'm cutting my poles asap, as I'm currently old school
post #4 of 31

I have very long arms for my height. My poles are probably shorter than a lot of 6 footers. I'm not recommending any particular length, just preaching about the benefits of adjustable poles for people who ski a variety of conditions.

I think the old advice to grip the pole upside down just under the basket and aim for a length that puts your elbow at 90 deg.

post #5 of 31
Skiing w some of the demo team folk last season, they were all going lower & getting a laugh at my poles smile.gif
post #6 of 31

You can always make poles shorter.  

post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by iriponsnow View Post

Skiing w some of the demo team folk last season, they were all going lower & getting a laugh at my poles smile.gif

When you all are trying to sidestep up through a few feet of fresh powder you'll have the last laugh. 

Think about it--on the firm groomed, where the demo team works, only the tip of the pole goes in the snow, and it's just a tap. On soft snow the pole may go in up to the basket or deeper. On the steeps you have to reach far downhill with your pole and may put considerable weight on it. How could one pole length be ideal for all?

post #8 of 31

I am 5 ft 11.5 in and I have been using 52 for many years. My arms are 34 and I like a 35-36 sleeve length. The poles measure correctly with the system of hand under basket and elbow at 90 degrees. 


Edited by levy1 - 10/10/16 at 5:58pm
post #9 of 31
I think the old advice to grip the pole upside down just under the basket and aim for a length that puts your elbow at 90 deg.
[/quote]

That's what I was taught too. But the tip doesn't go I the groomed snow and we don't ski with straight legs so we hold the pole by the grip with a 90° elbow. At 6' mine are 52". I do have some 50" poles but they always seem short.
post #10 of 31
Thread Starter 

so far leaning towards the adjustable ones then...

 

funny with be skiing on my 125cm ones though when i am skiing in Scotland but that will be 99% piste skiing....

 

keep opinions coming this is interesting....

post #11 of 31

Most people ski with poles that are too short.  The "ski shop" grip test is inaccurate and will leave you with poles too short.  Ski boots give you a higher platform and when you make your pole plant you are reaching downhill, more important for steeper terrain. 

 

Short ski poles cause beginners/intermediates to reach too forward causing them to twist their upper body in the opposite direction which is the exact thing you don't want to do to ski properly.  When you plant your pole your shoulders should be directly perpendicular to the fall line and a short pole will make that difficult. 

 

Poles too long are a rarity because of the inaccurate ski shop test.  Proper pole length will be a big help in deep moguls and they are also handy when appropriate to use as a rudder when going to fast. 

 

I would use ski shop test, go up a size, and make sure the elbows are bent up just a tad when measuring.  I have been through this with my kids and their friends.  EVERYONE I've skied with that just never seem to get the hang of advancing their skills ALWAYS have poles that are too short!

 

P.S. In powder short poles are a complete DISASTER!

post #12 of 31
I use Goode poles with the adjustable grips. I don't know if they still make them but I line being able to dial them in at about 51". I don't think you can cut down carbon poles like you can with aluminum.
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
 

Most people ski with poles that are too short.  The "ski shop" grip test is inaccurate and will leave you with poles too short.  Ski boots give you a higher platform and when you make your pole plant you are reaching downhill, more important for steeper terrain. 

 

 

The reason the shop grip works is that you are gripping under the basket--the additional length above your hand accommodates the height of ski boots, skiing posture etc. This only works for groomers, as I said. For groomers, if your poles are too long the tip will tend to catch. Of course the tip  just barely taps the snow--it's just a timing mechanism. 

I'm not kidding about my arms--my fingertips reach to about 2 inches above the tops of my kneecaps. My climbing ape index is +6 inches. No one should set their pole length based on mine.

(The arm span worked out well for me when I bought raffles tickets that were sold at $20 for an arm span's length of tickets. I won a Patagonia Nano Air jacket.) 

post #14 of 31

Climbing ape index? :confused I had to google that......my ape index is 1.01 (77" tall, 78" arm span).  That's always been my excuse for sorry-ass bench press capability.

 

Anyhoo, I've always gone with 54" poles.  As usual, I'm off the charts (see post #1).  I suppose 135 cm would be reasonably close.

 

My only advice in pole selection would be to go with carbon poles.  I had Scott aluminum poles for 35 years, and was getting sore wrists at the end of the day.  I shifted to Komperdell Godfather carbon poles a couple of years ago and that went away posthaste.  Both the Scott's and the Komperdell's have sabre style grips, but that's a personal choice that I won't push into this thread.

post #15 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbtbakkes View Post

I use Goode poles with the adjustable grips. I don't know if they still make them but I line being able to dial them in at about 51". I don't think you can cut down carbon poles like you can with aluminum.

 

I cut down golf clubs all the time.  You can cut graphite just as easy as steel or aluminum.  Re-gripping is the real issue, have to know what you're doing.

post #16 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post
 

Climbing ape index? :confused I had to google that......my ape index is 1.01 (77" tall, 78" arm span).  That's always been my excuse for sorry-ass bench press capability.

 

Anyhoo, I've always gone with 54" poles.  As usual, I'm off the charts (see post #1).  I suppose 135 cm would be reasonably close.

 

My only advice in pole selection would be to go with carbon poles.  I had Scott aluminum poles for 35 years, and was getting sore wrists at the end of the day.  I shifted to Komperdell Godfather carbon poles a couple of years ago and that went away posthaste.  Both the Scott's and the Komperdell's have sabre style grips, but that's a personal choice that I won't push into this thread.

can't whack at the snow on your boot soles with carbon. 

post #17 of 31

Steeper slopes your favorite...go long.  Deep snow your favorite...go long.  Deep angulation while carving...go short.

 

I broke my favorites last winter, and really like the strapless sword or sabre grip.  Straps bear on the arthritic joint in my thumb.  I saved my old grips; now I need to somehow pull the old strap grips off some good old poles and glue the sabre grips on.  (I've read how to pinch the pole in a door and pull the grip off that way...I'll try it again.)

post #18 of 31
I spray my boot sole's & bindings with silicone. Snow slide right off with no pole wacking!
post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post

I broke my favorites last winter, and really like the strapless sword or sabre grip.  Straps bear on the arthritic joint in my thumb.  I saved my old grips; now I need to somehow pull the old strap grips off some good old poles and glue the sabre grips on.  (I've read how to pinch the pole in a door and pull the grip off that way...I'll try it again.)
We used to hold just the grip in hot water and they'd pull off with 1 hand. Just put them on the new poles before they cool and they'd slide right on.
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbtbakkes View Post

I think the old advice to grip the pole upside down just under the basket and aim for a length that puts your elbow at 90 deg.
[/quote]

That's what I was taught too. But the tip doesn't go I the groomed snow and we don't ski with straight legs so we hold the pole by the grip with a 90° elbow. At 6' mine are 52". I do have some 50" poles but they always seem short.

I agree, 50 were always to short feeling to me.

post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
 

Steeper slopes your favorite...go long.  Deep snow your favorite...go long.  Deep angulation while carving...go short.

 

I broke my favorites last winter, and really like the strapless sword or sabre grip.  Straps bear on the arthritic joint in my thumb.  I saved my old grips; now I need to somehow pull the old strap grips off some good old poles and glue the sabre grips on.  (I've read how to pinch the pole in a door and pull the grip off that way...I'll try it again.)

I leave the straps on my poles for skating and climbing but for going downhill I just grab the grip and the strap. I haven't dropped a pole skiing since I've been doing that. Chouinard used to same thing about ice axe leashes for general climbing--a good climber hangs on to his ice axe. It is important to use the straps for skating on sticky tracks--it's annoying and embarassing to leave a pole 20 feet behind and have to go back for it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cbtbakkes View Post

I spray my boot sole's & bindings with silicone. Snow slide right off with no pole wacking!

 

Gotta be careful with that silicone spray. A tech was using silicone spray to lubricate a bronchoscope in the operating room and got some on the floor right inside the door. Every time someone came in the door during that case they fell down. We tried cleaning it up but that stuff is tenacious. Silicone coated boot soles and hard floors--it would be embarassing to break a bone in the lodge.

post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

I leave the straps on my poles for skating and climbing but for going downhill I just grab the grip and the strap. 

 

Same here.   After seeing what can happen to your thumb when a pole gets caught, I'd rather just loose the pole.  I can't recall the last time I dropped a pole either. 

post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by NPhoenix View Post
 

 

Same here.   After seeing what can happen to your thumb when a pole gets caught, I'd rather just loose the pole.  I can't recall the last time I dropped a pole either. 


If you use strap properly, there's simply no way for your thumb to get caught between pole and strap, so there's simply no way to get injured, as your pole just hang off your wrist and your thumb (and palm) is free to move ;)

post #24 of 31
But more than a few times my pole stuck in the snow and yanked out if my hand. Because of the strap I could keep going and not have to go back for it. A hard pull will release the strap so I don't get hurt. Maybe I need to just hold the pole tighter? But with the safety straps I think I'm safe...
post #25 of 31
Thread Starter 

decided to go with the Leki length adjustable ones... getting a good deal...

 

https://www.leki.com/uk/product-area/alpine-skiing/poles/2575/blue-bird-vario-s/

post #26 of 31
I was looking at those at a local ski show wit the rep a few weeks ago. Nice pole and that is a good deal.
post #27 of 31

I have Goode carbon poles and cut them down with the advice of Goode. No problems at all. bought really long poles because they were on sale for $40.

post #28 of 31
Goode has adjustable all carbon poles with 8" or 18" of adjustability for $125 & $150. They're not on their web site though so you need to special order them. I'm a big Goode fan but I think I'd go with the Leki for that price.
post #29 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbtbakkes View Post

I was looking at those at a local ski show wit the rep a few weeks ago. Nice pole and that is a good deal.

basically getting them for 75 UK Pounds or about 100 dollars with the rubbish exchange rate right now...

post #30 of 31
That's about what I'm seeing them on line for here too.
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