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Need suggestions on buying a pair of ski [Colorado, groomer, advanced (5-7 days/year), somewhat light skier]

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
  1. Where in the world are you skiing? Colorado, US

  2. What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry)  groomed runs

  3. How many days a year do you ski?  5-7 days

  4. How advanced are you as a skier?  advanced (I can handle single diamond and enjoy them)

  5. What's your height and weight? 5'5", 148lb, 48 years old, male

 

Looking for all purpose ski.

 

I'd greatly appreciate it if you can suggest some nice ski to buy (brand, model, length, width, etc...)

 

Thank you very much!

 

John

post #2 of 13

Try and pick up Sept's Ski Magazine, read the gear reviews. That should help you narrow down what your looking for. After you pick one or two. see if you can demo them before you buy.

 

At skiing only 5-7 day's a season...it's hard to recommend something you. Any of the top skis well be fine, those of us that ski a lot have come to learn different ski brands have different feel to them. I'll demo other brands, but normally buy Volkl for the past 10+ years. I've owned other brands when I was younger, but I like the way a Volkl communicates what the snow feels like under my boots.

post #3 of 13

Mod Note: Added to thread title for specificity.

post #4 of 13

Skiing 5 days a year you might as well rent.

 

High performance rentals are usually in the $40/day range, so that's $200 a season and you'll be able to either try new everyday, or try different things and see what you like.

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
 

Skiing 5 days a year you might as well rent.

 

High performance rentals are usually in the $40/day range, so that's $200 a season and you'll be able to either try new everyday, or try different things and see what you like.

 

This is a great suggestion.

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by wujiang1900 View Post
 
  1. Where in the world are you skiing? Colorado, US

  2. What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry)  groomed runs

  3. How many days a year do you ski?  5-7 days

  4. How advanced are you as a skier?  advanced (I can handle single diamond and enjoy them)

  5. What's your height and weight? 5'5", 148lb, 48 years old, male

 

Looking for all purpose ski.

 

I'd greatly appreciate it if you can suggest some nice ski to buy (brand, model, length, width, etc...)

 

Thank you very much!

 

John


What skis have you used the last few years?  Is there any way you could make it to a free demo day?  If not, it's worthwhile to do a "personal demo day" by renting demo skis on mountain and switching out every 2-3 runs.

 

Another approach is to find a ski swap and just buy something to get you started based on suggestions from people working at the swap.  Might not be the best, but it's a start.  Can sell and buy something even more appropriate later.

 

When I started skiing more regularly (10-15 days), I bought skis for skiing locally with my young daughter.  But for trips out west, I brought my boots and rented skis for a couple seasons.

 

By the way, if you are only skiing black diamond groomed runs, most people would not consider that as "advanced" quite yet.  But depends on whether you simply prefer groomed runs or whether you aren't comfortable in ungroomed terrain (trees, bumps, steeps).  As a working adult, I only skied groomed trails out west.  Had a very good time but knew there was more to skiing.  Found out exactly what was needed to enjoy advanced terrain after I retired and could ski 20+ days a season.

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

I think I need to make some corrections since I posted.

 

I'm actually looking for an all mountain ski, and I prefer more powder skiing rather than groomed. And I think I plan to ski about 7 days a year.

 

I think I'm only an intermediate / advanced skier. I enjoy single diamond most.

 

Please give suggestion on what length to choose. I'm thinking the range of 166-172mm,  will that too long for me?

post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by wujiang1900 View Post
 
  1. Where in the world are you skiing? Colorado, US

  2. What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry)  groomed runs

  3. How many days a year do you ski?  5-7 days

  4. How advanced are you as a skier?  advanced (I can handle single diamond and enjoy them)

  5. What's your height and weight? 5'5", 148lb, 48 years old, male

 

Looking for all purpose ski.

 

I'd greatly appreciate it if you can suggest some nice ski to buy (brand, model, length, width, etc...)

 

Thank you very much!

 

John

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wujiang1900 View Post
 

I think I need to make some corrections since I posted.

 

I'm actually looking for an all mountain ski, and I prefer more powder skiing rather than groomed. And I think I plan to ski about 7 days a year.

 

I think I'm only an intermediate / advanced skier. I enjoy single diamond most.

 

Please give suggestion on what length to choose. I'm thinking the range of 166-172mm,  will that too long for me?


I doubt that's too long.  For reference, as an older advanced skier who is petite (5'0", 110 lbs), my all-mountain skis are 159cm and when I rent powder skis that are even more rockered then I can be quite comfortable on skis up to about 165cm.  You are several inches taller and should be skiing on correspondingly longer skis.

 

If I were you, I would rent demo skis this season and then buy skis during the late season.  Although if you demo from a shop that gives credit towards buying skis and you find skis that are fun for you, could just buy them and not have to think about buying skis for a season or two.

 

Do you fly to ski?  Note that you will also need to decide how to transport skis when you own a pair . . . or two.

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by wujiang1900 View Post
 

I think I need to make some corrections since I posted.

 

I'm actually looking for an all mountain ski, and I prefer more powder skiing rather than groomed. And I think I plan to ski about 7 days a year.

 

I think I'm only an intermediate / advanced skier. I enjoy single diamond most.

 

Please give suggestion on what length to choose. I'm thinking the range of 166-172mm,  will that too long for me?


Hi John,

 

So, you're looking for an all-mountain ski with a powder bias, so probably a wide all-mountain (100-ish mm), but not a true powder ski (110mm +, say).  There are lots of great skis in this category.

 

Besides where you like to ski, can you say a bit about how you ski? For instance, do you have a race background and/or do you regularly carve high edge-angle turns, or do you like to pivot / smear your turns. In other words, would you prefer a directional ski (strong carver) or more of a surfy, smeary, big-rocker ski?

 

Answers to those questions could help answer questions about length, too.  I'm around your height and 22 lbs. heavier, and my skis range from 165cm to 177cm.  The 165s (and 166) are what we call "full-camber" skis— the tip and the tail of the ski are always in contact with the snow.

 

 

Full-camber, or "traditional camber," skis generally ski "long." So for a 5'5", 148 lb. intermediate, you're probably going to want traditional-camber skis more in the range of 165cm or thereabouts. Full camber skis are often excellent carvers, and often require good carving skills to get the most out of them.

 

 

 

Most powder-oriented skis have some degree of "rocker" (a term borrowed from waterskiing).

 


The illustration shows a "fully rockered" ski. You see full rocker now mainly on dedicated powder skis, not so much on all-mountain skis. Rockered skis make pivoting and slarving turns easy, and they make deep powder skiing easy, too. They usually don't carve well, so if carving's your thing, avoid them. Powder skis are generally very wide — 110 to 140mm+ — and they ski "short," meaning a skier your size might easily pilot a pair of 180cm or longer skis.

 

 

Most "all mountain" skis these days come with some form of tip rocker (or both tip and tail rocker) with camber under foot. Tip rocker is also known as "early rise." In skis with tip rocker, the contact point (where the flat ski first touches the snow) is brought back somewhat toward the center — the tips splay upward. This makes it possible for the ski to float better in powder, but, to a greater or lesser extent, may impact carving precision. Still many (e.g., Nordica Enforcers) carve well on harder snow (some reviews to the contrary).

 

Here's an example of tip rocker (or rocker-camber, or early-rise):

 


Skis of this type also feel shorter than length alone suggests. (My rocker-camber Nordica Enforcers, for instance, are 177cm — ten centimeters taller than I am — and they feel almost too short. I've skied 180cm Rossinol Sin 7s comfortably.)

 

How these different cambers feel on snow also depends on construction and materials (core material, laminates, damping materials, etc.), which affect the ski's stiffness and flex, etc., and side-cut (the shape of the ski as seen from above). The variables are almost too many to count, including the variables that the skier brings to the equation. That's why most knowledgeable skiers suggest demoing as many skis as possible before making a decision.

 

If what you've told us is dead accurate, you'll probably be looking for a ski of, say, 90-100mm wide, with some tip and maybe tail rocker. After that, your skiing style and preferences will narrow the answers somewhat.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post

Skiing 5 days a year you might as well rent.

High performance rentals are usually in the $40/day range, so that's $200 a season and you'll be able to either try new everyday, or try different things and see what you like.

+2. I would definitely consider this. There are plenty of places to do this. I will just throw Christy Sports out there as an example. They have a decent selection of all mountain skis. I think they charge $26 along the front range. Prices are higher at mountain locations. Not sure about their seasonal rental programs. Another perk is getting to ski on the latest skis each season a lot cheaper. smile.gif

A ski recommendation? Demo the Kastle FX 85. Try both the HP and non HP in a 165. If it feels too long they do have it in a 157 but you might have a hard time finding that length to demo.
post #11 of 13

For your weight and ability, and since this would be your only ski, I would consider all-mountain skis with a width in the mid-80s to low 90s.  No need for anything wider for how you ski and your size.  Lots of choices - Rossi E84 and E88, Enforcer 93, Volkl Kendo, Blizzard Brahma, etc.  Renting each day is an option, but I would look for last years leftovers or demos.  You should be able to score a pair with bindings for not much more than you'd spend on a season or two of performance rentals.  And 170 +/- is about right for length.      

post #12 of 13
E88 is a great option. Another is a Dynastar Powertrack 89. The OP has clarified that he prefers to ski powder, thus the inclination to suggest wider.

I hesitate just a little on the Enforcer. The OP is just a bit on the low-mass side of the equation. Might work great for him, might not. Definitely worth a demo, though. Great ski.

I can concur with Mike78s rec of the FX 85, especially the non-HP for lighter western skier (less so, maybe, for an east coaster).

Those are just skis I've been on and liked, so my recommendations are biased, and they're only somewhat educated guesses. Nothing replaces experience with the skis themselves, and a demo is a good place to start (though nothing like perfect, as most will admit).
post #13 of 13

Armada Invictus 95 167 cm

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