or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › How To Wax & Deburr Skis 4 Part Video Series
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How To Wax & Deburr Skis 4 Part Video Series

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

If your wanting to start waxing your own skis this series I made can help you out. 

 

I'll give you part 1 here, then you can follow through to the other 3.   Feel free to comment or ask questions on the YouTube videos or here.

post #2 of 11

Thanks for the link!

 

Is the info in this video about scraping and brushing for final prep included somewhere in the 4-part series?

 

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Thanks for the link!

 

Is the info in this video about scraping and brushing for final prep included somewhere in the 4-part series?

 


Wow, did you view all four totally?  My latest scraping and brushing video.  Here you go.

post #4 of 11

Nope, haven't watched them all yet.  But found the 9-min one about scraping and brushing looking around YouTube.  While I do wax my own skis most of the time, I don't mess with tuning the edges.

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Nope, haven't watched them all yet.  But found the 9-min one about scraping and brushing looking around YouTube.  While I do wax my own skis most of the time, I don't mess with tuning the edges.


Well, it's only a matter of time before you start doing your own tuning I'll assume.  It's always best one step at a time. 

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Nope, haven't watched them all yet.  But found the 9-min one about scraping and brushing looking around YouTube.  While I do wax my own skis most of the time, I don't mess with tuning the edges.


Well, it's only a matter of time before you start doing your own tuning I'll assume.  It's always best one step at a time. 


Maybe, maybe not.  For skiing in the southeast, don't really need sharp edges.  For skiing out west, don't really need to mess with my edges either since I plan trips to find soft snow.  I'm more likely to continue to pay for an annual tune at my local ski shop.  But I like knowing what should be done. :)

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post


Maybe, maybe not.  For skiing in the southeast, don't really need sharp edges.  For skiing out west, don't really need to mess with my edges either since I plan trips to find soft snow.  

 

Bragging, M.

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Nope, haven't watched them all yet.  But found the 9-min one about scraping and brushing looking around YouTube.  While I do wax my own skis most of the time, I don't mess with tuning the edges.


Well, it's only a matter of time before you start doing your own tuning I'll assume.  It's always best one step at a time. 


Maybe, maybe not.  For skiing in the southeast, don't really need sharp edges.  For skiing out west, don't really need to mess with my edges either since I plan trips to find soft snow.  I'm more likely to continue to pay for an annual tune at my local ski shop.  But I like knowing what should be done. :)


Yea, I hear you.  If one only skis so many days a season etc. an annual tune is fine as long as you get a competent one!

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 
Yea, I hear you.  If one only skis so many days a season etc. an annual tune is fine as long as you get a competent one!

One of the best shop tunes I've had was near Loon in NH when I was going to ski for a week in the northeast during early season.  Knowing what's involved definitely makes it easier to tell if a shop is likely to do a good job when I'm traveling to new places.

 

Since I split my time and have a quiver of two, that means each pair of skis gets used 20-25 days.  Plus if I get lucky and catch a powder storm out west, I demo fat skis.

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 

If your wanting to start waxing your own skis this series I made can help you out. 

 

I'll give you part 1 here, then you can follow through to the other 3.   Feel free to comment or ask questions on the YouTube videos or here.


​thanks. good detail.

 

I don't know about the effectiveness of that low temp hot waxing... I don't think the wax would penetrate as deeply. Why not start up front with a slower pass, why do so many passes to get the base hot? You end up in the same place, with a hot base and a trail of molten wax...

 

Some of the studies I've seen, don't remember the link now, had the best wax absorbtion at an iron speed of 3mm/sec. That's what I've been doing all season and it works ok. I only adjust the speed depending on wax melting temp.

 

So my routine now is two passes: one to melt the wax uiniformly, at whatever speed it takes to do that in one pass and one to work it in, at 3mm/sec, give or take depending on how the wax melts.

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 

If your wanting to start waxing your own skis this series I made can help you out. 

 

I'll give you part 1 here, then you can follow through to the other 3.   Feel free to comment or ask questions on the YouTube videos or here.


​thanks. good detail.

 

I don't know about the effectiveness of that low temp hot waxing... I don't think the wax would penetrate as deeply. Why not start up front with a slower pass, why do so many passes to get the base hot? You end up in the same place, with a hot base and a trail of molten wax...

 

Some of the studies I've seen, don't remember the link now, had the best wax absorbtion at an iron speed of 3mm/sec. That's what I've been doing all season and it works ok. I only adjust the speed depending on wax melting temp.

 

So my routine now is two passes: one to melt the wax uiniformly, at whatever speed it takes to do that in one pass and one to work it in, at 3mm/sec, give or take depending on how the wax melts.


It has been said that it's heat and time combined.  Thus hot boxing over a longer time with less heat.  Mostly I try to stress to beginners not to use too hot of an iron.  I have seen many a ski base bubbled from too hot of an iron.  

I would agree that if an iron is up to 250F or higher that one would need to move quite quickly and limit the passes as to avoid damaging the base.

Sure there are more ways to skin a cat.

I have found the way I do it to work quite well and I don't get base burn on my skis even after skiing several days.  I usually re-wax my skis about every fourth day give or take.

I focus on slowly heating the ski as to provide a uniform heat.  Some areas cool quickly and other don't.

I think we can agree that no matter how one does it that wax only goes so many microns deep. 

 

Here is another one I made.  Long as usual.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › How To Wax & Deburr Skis 4 Part Video Series