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what is the best advice you have on accident documentation?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I will be hosting a "documentation" station at our refresher and am looking for suggestions,  anecdotes, etc to make this both interesting and usable..   thoughts?

Len

 

PS.   would appreciate any examples of "good" reports (assuming HIPPA data blacked out)


Edited by Lenkearney - 9/21/16 at 10:58am
post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 

ok, so either noboldy reads these - or everybody really, REALLY hates documentation..:words:

post #3 of 7

You probably already know this and will cover it but:

 

No blank spaces. Either filled out or N/A with N/A=Not Applicable written in comments section.

 

Print not cursive.

 

Also, put something in the comment section that is relevant and that upon review 3 years from now will help you remember the incident.

 

And finally. Most Accident Report Forms are really confusing. Some of the better stations I have been through, everyone was given a blank form and as a group they fill the form out while asking the "patient" the questions, then go through them together and see how differently each person evaluated and transcribed the answers.

 

Good luck, this is a tough topic to make interesting.

post #4 of 7

Less is more.

Don't double document anything.  Ever.

There is no way you can ever make something more accurate. You can make it less accurate.

 

Document only what you saw, heard, or did.

post #5 of 7

I just try to trick the newbies into doing most of it.

post #6 of 7
These tips come from my days writing incident reports as a Paramedic. I'm not sure how they may relate to Ski Patrol, but presume the principals are the same.

1 Make sure to differentiate between what you actually saw, and want you were told. For instance there is a huge difference between "Mr Grey fell off the cliff", "I saw Mr Grey fall off the cliff" and "Mr Grey states he fell off the cliff".

2 Unless your are a Dr, be careful not to diagnose a medical problem. I know this sounds minor, but can get you in trouble with "scope of practice". So, instead of saying "Mr Grey broke his leg", say "Mr Grey has swelling, deformity and pain in his lower leg consistent with a fracture."

3 Also be careful of jumping to conclusions. Rather than saying "Mr Grey was drunk", say "Mr Grey exhibits an unsteady gait, slurred speech and an odor consistent with the consumption of ETOH."

Hope these are what you are looking for and help.
post #7 of 7
1. Review previous seasons paperwork
2. Determine issues
3. Discuss issues specific to your patrol

Or:

1. Post here and expect answers that don't apply to you.


Your choice.
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