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Should I get new ski boots?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

My current ski boots are 2014 Lange XT 100.  I love them for skiing -- very responsive and confidence-instilling.  Problem is they're a bear to put on and don't particularly fit me like a glove.  My "black toe" is just now fading away from last season.  After I purchased them, I took them back to the ski store FIVE times for tweaking and expanding.  They're still not quite right.  So, I'm thinking, it's three model years later, maybe I should get new boots.  OTOH, maybe I'm just falling victim to the "grass is greener" syndrome...    

 

Foot facts:  mine are relatively wide at the toe, narrow at the heal; bony protrusions at the heal; years of abuse (I've been a runner for decades).

 

Any further facts needed?

 

Thoughts?  Do I stay (with my current boots) or do I go (to the ski/boot store)?  If I go, for which boots?

 

I know some will recommend that I just accept whatever the bootfitter brings out from the store room.  The problem I have with that scenario is that no ski store has an infinite store room, and all have an incentive to "move" what they have.  So when I go to the skis store(s), I'd like to have in mind a list of what might work.   Suggestions?

 

Part of what's driving this is that I picked up a new pair of skis last spring.  So, before the dude at the ski store drills the holes to install the bindings, I'd like them to be set up for the boots I'll be using for a while.

 

Thoughts, comments, donations, etc. welcome.... 

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 11

Not enough info to make a recommendation---

 

What size boots?

 

What size feet in centimeters (width and length)

 

What size calf muscles at the top of the liner---a large calf muscle will push the knees forward more and any extension of the torso and legs will

lever against the back of the boot cuff sooner and push the foot forward into the toe box of the boot (ouch--black toe coming up).

 

mike

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
OK, I'll measure this weekend and revert.
post #4 of 11

regardless of any measurement you put on here the best thing is to work with your boot fitter to sort out either new boots or the current ones

 

sure no shop has an endless stockroom, but the good ones will have a large range of models /flexes / lasts and can fit most feet, the really good ones will know when to say no and send you to somewhere who has the boot which will work best if they don't have it 

 

the trick is finding one of these fitters

post #5 of 11

As CEM says "find a boot fitter", that said, where are you located, perhaps we can recommend someone to help with your issues.

 

mike

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post
 

regardless of any measurement you put on here the best thing is to work with your boot fitter to sort out either new boots or the current ones

 

sure no shop has an endless stockroom, but the good ones will have a large range of models /flexes / lasts and can fit most feet, the really good ones will know when to say no and send you to somewhere who has the boot which will work best if they don't have it 

 

the trick is finding one of these fitters

 

Thanks for making my prediction come true -- I KNEW one of you guys would say this!  The idea that there should be a totally asymmetric relationship between the bootfitter and the customer is well-trod on this forum and elsewhere (see Jackson Hogan's columns).  I don't have that kind of relationship with my doctor, my dentist, my accountant, and (I could go on) -- so I'm not inclined to have that with a bootfitter.  

 

I'm asking for advice on specific boot models.  If you would not like to offer some suggestions, that's fine, it's your prerogative.  But please don't soil the water for those who would like to offer some help.  Thanks.

post #7 of 11

t

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post
 

 

Thanks for making my prediction come true -- I KNEW one of you guys would say this!  The idea that there should be a totally asymmetric relationship between the bootfitter and the customer is well-trod on this forum and elsewhere (see Jackson Hogan's columns).  I don't have that kind of relationship with my doctor, my dentist, my accountant, and (I could go on) -- so I'm not inclined to have that with a bootfitter.  

 

I'm asking for advice on specific boot models.  If you would not like to offer some suggestions, that's fine, it's your prerogative.  But please don't soil the water for those who would like to offer some help.  Thanks.

thanks for your concern and i am glad you could predict the answer you were going to get.... maybe its because it is the only one we can give you without seeing your feet, but i think what you will find by posting on this forum is that most if not all the people who can respond own or at least work in a ski shop specializing in fitting boots... it is not about an asymmetric relationship with your boot fitter, more of a joint venture, the boot fitters know the boot stock the shapes the lasts and the flexes and based on what they see and what your feedback to them is a mutual agreement of the correct boot is reached, trying to do this on line by you saying i have a narrow foot and a high arch etc doesn't achieve anything other than you being really pissed off when the boot you get doesn't work as perfectly as you thought it might, by working with a fitter you have a point of contact, a place to go and have adjustment made and a person to shout at if it all goes wrong... 

 

if you want general recommendations then i suggest you post in the gear section, nobody on here can see your feet and as such cannot recommend a boot for you 

 

based on the sparse information that you gave in your first post i would suggest that your current boot is either too big or at very least has too much volume in it and thus allows you to slide forward and bruise the toe nail, either that or a ski lesson is called for if you are in the back seat and damaging the toe that way

 

 

but if in doubt buy the red ones , they are always faster :rolleyes:rolleyes:rolleyes 

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post
 

 

but if in doubt buy the red ones , they are always faster :rolleyes:rolleyes:rolleyes 

 

Darn it -- I was hoping you'd recommend the neon green ones!  :(  

post #9 of 11

The Atomic Prime has a great V shape as you described your foot.  It has the added bene of a heat moldable shell, which adapts to nuances of your foot shape.  It also has an ample toe box , which should reduce the pesky and unsexy black toe issue.  But the footbed built to go with the boot is also a prime part of solving that issue.  

At the BootDoctors in Telluride, we have as close to an infinite boot room as exists.  Get on a plane and treat yourself!

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BootDr1 View Post
 

The Atomic Prime has a great V shape as you described your foot.  It has the added bene of a heat moldable shell, which adapts to nuances of your foot shape.  It also has an ample toe box , which should reduce the pesky and unsexy black toe issue.  But the footbed built to go with the boot is also a prime part of solving that issue.  

At the BootDoctors in Telluride, we have as close to an infinite boot room as exists.  Get on a plane and treat yourself!

 

BootDr1 -- Thanks!  Telluride is already on my bucket list for the skiing, and you've just given me another reason to come there.  Since we've already booked for Xmas break (Aspen/Snowmass -- my wife chose), the soonest I could get to T-ride would be for late winter / early spring.  Will you have any boots left by then?

 

Also, as I mentioned in my initial post, I have new skis and haven't had the bindings attached yet.  In order to ski at Xmas, I'm going to need to attach the bindings.  I'd like to avoid having a second set of holes drilled into the skis when I get new boots.  Assuming my size doesn't change (I went down half a size when I moved from beginner boots to my Lange XTs a couple years ago), what are the chances that you won't have move the bindings (and drill new holes) when I buy new boots?

 

Thanks,

Jimski   

post #11 of 11

Hi Jimski,

Aspen is fun at Christmas.

Towards late February, we tend to start selling out of some boot models.  It is hard to predict which ones.  My guess is the Hawx Prime is going to be a strong seller.  If you could come up with an excuse to visit Telluride for MLK weekend or in early February, we should still have almost everything.   Towards the end of the season the pencil gets sharper, but the selection dwindles.

The skiing here is off the hook.  i hope you can visit.

Bob

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