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Is off-piste skiing hard on knees? - Page 2

post #31 of 42

If it has not been said I want to say how  proud the ski community is of you and  your determination to learn to ski. For what you have been through most skiers would have quit. You continue to preserve and learn and you have a skiers heart. This is special and not everyone has it. It is reserved for the distinctive few who continue to learn and gain knowledge. We predict great things for you and  we know one day you will ski by us and we will say, "What a great skier"

post #32 of 42
Thread Starter 

@levy1 I am a low intermediate progressing at snail's pace (despite my Herculean effort). I persevere because skiing has taught me 3 fundamental lessons in life. 1) fear management - I learned how to face my fear and tackle it; 2) if it is difficult the 1st time I try, I must attempt the 2nd time. Based on my experience, the 2nd attempt is always easier; 3) be patient - got to finish that turn before starts a new one.

There are times I struggled on slopes and all I wanted to do is to take off the skis, just walk the slope (have done it few times).  During those times, I really hate the fact that I put myself through such un-necessary stress.  But then, by the time I make down to the lift, I felt accomplished and felt I have conquered an insurmountable task.  So I am ready to go again.....  

 

I know I am getting off track here but thought I share my motivation about skiing. 

post #33 of 42
Everything is going to change with the new boot fitting and or alignment I promise you. You will be very surprised and very quickly in so much more control which means more fun and confidance.
post #34 of 42

fosphenytoin:  (I was going to ask you if you were the inventor of fosphenytoin, but I doubt it since it looks like it was invented in 1996.) 

 

True confessions:  I bought too big boots the first season, and replaced them with the next size down the next season (not nice at twice the price!).  My guess is that you and I are not the only skiers who have made this "mistake," so much so that it is probably not correctly called a "mistake" but rather merely part of the learning curve.

 

Now I ski in boots two sizes smaller than my street shoe size, with a footbed, and a plastic shell shape which fits the anatomical outline of my foot (Lange for narrow heel and wider toe box).

 

But don't stop at boots.  You will buy and travel with your boots, but given the airline expense, probably not with skis.  I rented skis in Val D'Isere.  At least in 2005, the entire valley including one of the higher end rental shops, was run by Scots, so communication is easy.

 

We have all taught light or small Asian women, and in my experience they are often given too long skis.  Many times I have sent them back to our rental shop for much shorter skis.

 

A too long ski will act as a lever on your boot, which will exacerbate any looseness in the boot.  And it is easy to catch an edge and go down.

 

Think about it this way.  The boot and the ski are an exoskeleton - your exoskeleton.  They must fit you like an extension of your internal skeleton.  They must move when you move.  Any delay in response must be minimal.  As others have said a light, tight, shaped-like-your-foot, boot is simply essential.  They must feel like your aerobics shoes.

 

So, IMHO, a light (maybe even a child's) ski is worth trying. I tell my students "buy boots, but demo skis."  Learn to love skis, by demoing lots and lots of them.  Speed date them 3 pair per day, the style for that day's conditions.  At the daily rental rate but with unlimited exchanges (the Scots love to negotiate - you can negotiate a deal including keeping them overnight to avoid the morning rush).

 

In all my sports, the equipment is weight driven.  I.e., a whitewater kayak model comes in child through extra large volume.  Windsurf sails and boards are based on your weight for a given wind speed.  Ski length width and flex are based on the skier's weight.  There are all sizes of men and women on this forum - many of whom have demo'd or bought various skis for the body weight.  So, if you feel comfortable letting it all hang out, my guess is that if you give your height and weight, others of similar height and weight will make recommendations to you.

 

If you are an artist, you wouldn't use a calligraphy pen with a head which wobbled 1/4" up and down and around would you?  If you are a scientist, you wouldn't accept a 10-30% standard deviation in your test results would you?  

 

Welcome to the world of high performance skiing.  Spelled F-U-N (not-intimidating-skiing).

 

On another thread we were talking about roller skating, rollerblading and ice skating.  A well fitted ski-boot-leg/exoskeleton should feel almost like skates.  As you gain confidence, you can go wider and longer with your skis, but to start on groomers, you should have a ski which you can "throw" (i.e., "drive") - not the other way around.

 

As levy1 and LiquidFeet have recognized, you clearly have the drive and perseverance necessary to become a great skier.  But from your description of your boots, you need to make a commitment to a boot which fits like a soft, but firm handshake.

 

And my guess is that you need a physician experienced with osteopenia who skis.

 

http://www.theskidiva.com/forums/index.php?threads/skiing-with-osteopenia-and-or-osteoporosis.7881/

 

http://snowheads.com/ski-forum/viewtopic.php?t=116509

 

https://www.j2ski.com/ski-chat-forum/posts/list/9187.page


Edited by Tim Hodgson - 9/23/16 at 9:29pm
post #35 of 42

Since TimH brought up a Diva thread about skiing with osteopenia, here's a more recent one with ways to build bone.  The exercises for building bone in legs and hips are pretty good for skiing too.  Especially when combined with flexibility and balance exercises.  Having better balance is always good for skiing.  Have better balance means less chance of a fall in everyday shoes that results in a broken hip.

 

http://www.theskidiva.com/forums/index.php?threads/dealing-with-osteopenia-ways-to-increase-bone-density.19834/

post #36 of 42

Hey fosphenytoin   In thinking over the appropriateness of my advice to you, a phrase popped into my mind which I will use with my students from now on:

 

 

MARRY YOUR BOOTS !!!    DATE YOUR SKIS...

 

 

Thank you.

post #37 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Hodgson View Post
 

Hey fosphenytoin   In thinking over the appropriateness of my advice to you, a phrase popped into my mind which I will use with my students from now on:

 

 

MARRY YOUR BOOTS !!!    DATE YOUR SKIS...

 

 

Thank you.


Yes.  and I think it is time to re-evalute this marriage after I see a bootfiter next month.  I need to start dating again for new skis.  I am 5'5" and currently using 143 cm skis, time to get longer skis before I go to Val D'Isere.....  (undecided if I shall rent or bring).

post #38 of 42

For your comparison my wife who skis better off piste** than me is 5' 5 1/2" (~130-134lbs?*) and her Volkl 724Pro's are 163 cm  and her Rossi W7's are 178 cm.  Which, speaking of dating the skis, she looked askance at the W7's and was unsure about them even after demoing them and wouldn't currently have adopted them as her current one ski quiver if I hadn't bought them for her, because she is reluctant to change.  (Which, now that I think about it, for me anyway, is a great marital attribute...)

 

* My guess.  Don't ever tell her I posted this!

 

I am ~5' 10-11 ~200lbs., my Super7's are 194 but plan to spend a lot of time on my 150 cm Salomon 3V Equipe slalom skis this season.  

 

**  She introduced me to tree skiing and cat skiing.


Edited by Tim Hodgson - 9/24/16 at 9:50am
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Hodgson View Post
 

I am ~5' 10-11 ~200lbs., my Super7's are 194 but plan to spend a lot of time on my 150 cm Salomon 3V Equipe slalom skis this season.  

 

 

Wow.

post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Hodgson View Post
...................

I am ~5' 10-11 ~200lbs., my Super7's are 194 but plan to spend a lot of time on my 150 cm Salomon 3V Equipe slalom skis this season.  

...................


Those are very short skis for you.  What's your motivation?

 

I landed a pair of MX70s at 153 at the end of last season.  Boy did they feel short.  I'm 5'5" and 130...ish.

I didn't get much time on those little skis.  I will play with balance and not overpowering them this season.  

They feel like delicate little babies.  I'm imagining your slaloms will feel the same.


I've also got a pair of Redster FIS slaloms out for delivery at 155.  I don't expect them to feel like babies, though.

These two additions to my quiver should help make it a fun season if we get a lot of refrozen ice like we had last year.


Edited by LiquidFeet - 10/5/16 at 5:53am
post #41 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Hodgson View Post
 

For your comparison my wife who skis better off piste** than me is 5' 5 1/2" (~130-134lbs?*) and her Volkl 724Pro's are 163 cm  and her Rossi W7's are 178 cm.  Which, speaking of dating the skis, she looked askance at the W7's and was unsure about them even after demoing them and wouldn't currently have adopted them as her current one ski quiver if I hadn't bought them for her, because she is reluctant to change.  (Which, now that I think about it, for me anyway, is a great marital attribute...)

 

* My guess.  Don't ever tell her I posted this!

 

I am ~5' 10-11 ~200lbs., my Super7's are 194 but plan to spend a lot of time on my 150 cm Salomon 3V Equipe slalom skis this season.  

 

**  She introduced me to tree skiing and cat skiing.


I advise you give the 150 cm skis to your wife; you will be over-driving them and would progress faster on 160s or even 165s.

post #42 of 42

Bob Peters, LF and Ghost:  Relax, I checked on them this morning, they are 155cm (not 1150cm).  Ok, ok,ok, I know they should be 165-167cm but new skis are not in the budget this season.

 

Bob Peters I want to learn to do this:

 

 


Edited by Tim Hodgson - 10/4/16 at 8:59pm
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