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Ski School Demo - Wedge to Parallel (video) - Page 2

post #31 of 36
Thread Starter 

Great input by all of you. And thanks razie for the video link. I have watched a lot of JFB's instructional videos and they are great. Lots to be learned from them. One of the things that JFB is trying to teach in his video is "direction" over "compression". He also teaches how to release and how to create outside ski pressure. This is also something I do. This is for example the reason I don't teach up-extension to flatten the skis and release when wedge turning. For the same reasons JFB described in his video. We are both trying to avoid compression. You don't want to compress where you should actually extend. The pressure build up is a result of other movements. Instead I teach how to distribute the pressure between the skis in order to have them turn one way or another. More friction on your left ski is going to turn you right. More friction on your outside ski is going to turn you inside. 

 

One thing he does not teach in the video is how to up-unweight his turn initiation. In his case its just a result of other movements. Mainly change of direction. Here is one of the few differences between my and JFB's teaching method. Even if the result is the same. I don't teach the release by sliding sideways and direction by turning my legs and feet but instead I teach direction by edging and balancing movements in combination with leg turning but more importantly the release by pressure control. Note that we are reaching the exact same goal, just going there a bit differently.

 

Who was first, the egg or the chicken? I'm referring to active vs passive weight transfer. Who was first, outside ski pressure or turning? On this issue I'm with Tim except that in my video the movements were much more subtle than they would be during a lesson. At the very beginning, first lessons first 5 minutes, I go for a 100% active weight transfer. In this case it would be me standing on flat snow and showing how I transfer weight from one side to the other by leaning sideways with my upper body. The reason is that there is no speed that is the critical component of passive weight transfer. As we progress onto the bunny slope and start wedging down the hill, bending sideways to create pressure helps in two ways: the skis turn easier and we start to ingrain the angulation movement. At the other end of the spectrum, advanced carving and ski racing, there is a 100% passive weight transfer. That means that we only tip our skis and there through we get the turn forces react upon us. Still we need to actively angulate in order not to bank. So the active weight transfer served a very important purpose. And why not learn it from our very first 5 minutes of our first lesson?

 

I particularly liked JFB's segment starting at 07:30. A great demo of how not to compress into your turns. I have this great wedging exercise where you turn in a wedge by releasing the inside ski by lifting its tip of the snow. This is a butt killer but very effective in teaching outside leg extension, proper hip placement, angulation, inside ski tipping and ridding that up-down motion we don't want. At 07:47 you can see JFB's version of it where he is not actively lifting that inside ski but still does almost the exact same movements.

 

One slight difference between JFB and myself is that I'm not so absolute in my teaching. I like the way he holds his grounds. Something I could definitely learn a lot from :rolleyes.

post #32 of 36
Thread Starter 

Here is another interesting video. Its the javelin turn. For me it has been almost impossible to make it out of a parallel stance if not carved. Any thoughts?

 

post #33 of 36

Yes I notice that with Javelins that many skiers start from a wedge to do them.

 

Take a look at this Javelin video.  I like his emphasis that you have to steer the outside ski under the lifted ski - not turn the lifted ski over the outside ski.

 

post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

Yes I notice that with Javelins that many skiers start from a wedge to do them.

 

Take a look at this Javelin video.  I like his emphasis that you have to steer the outside ski under the lifted ski - not turn the lifted ski over the outside ski.

 

Hmmm   He is a great skier and the drill he teaches is a great drill.... but did you notice the position of his shoulders and head during his short radius turns vs his javelin turns?

 

When doing the short radius turns, his upper body is rightly facing direction of travel.....down the hill

When doing the javelin turn, his upper body is rightly facing direction of travel..... a carving arc

 

So IMO javelin turns are a great exercise but focus on carving skills more that short radius rotational skills

 

Short radius wedge turns with outside leg focus and disciplined pole plant...now there's a rotational turn drill.

 

But again, great skiing and drill

post #35 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

Yes I notice that with Javelins that many skiers start from a wedge to do them.

 

Take a look at this Javelin video.  I like his emphasis that you have to steer the outside ski under the lifted ski - not turn the lifted ski over the outside ski.

 

 

Yes, but notice that his turns are highly asymmetrical. Here:

 

 

Turning right he steers the outside ski further under his inside ski than turning left. Or is it the other way around, that he points his inside ski further across the outside ski while turning left? Is he pointing the inside ski or steering the outside ski? Asymmetrical in any case.

 

And yes, he also starts out of a wedge. I must try this next time on snow.

post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

Yes I notice that with Javelins that many skiers start from a wedge to do them.

 

Take a look at this Javelin video.  I like his emphasis that you have to steer the outside ski under the lifted ski - not turn the lifted ski over the outside ski.

 

 

Yes, but. like you, he does not say why to do this which makes this drill presentation incomplete and, therefore, difficult to follow. He also really doesn't offer cues for correct drill form, in particularly, how to detect that you are, in fact, turning under the lifted ski. A possible cue could be to only rotate your outside femur socket while keeping the inside femur socket static. This type of exercise may also need a frame of reference to do it correctly such as whether the skier's FoR is at their feet for lifting the ski over or at their hips for turning the ski under.  Either way, the outside ski is still steering and the inside ski is still crossing over and will probably cover 90%+ of the exercises benefits. I agree with TDK that he is probably doing a little of both as separation of these two movements could be likely very difficult and more so without a designated frame of reference and correct form cue. 

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