or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Dry Times (Tahoe Drought Documentary)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dry Times (Tahoe Drought Documentary)

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Recently ran across this trailer for an upcoming documentary about the impact that the lack of snow has had on Tahoe the last few years. It's an interesting concept for me, we focus (with good reason) on the direct impact on the skiing industry. This film looks at how the impact on the ski resorts also is impacting the community and local economy as a whole. 

 

post #2 of 11

The impact of the drought on skiing, the ski industry, and the Tahoe economy is a fraction of the impact on agriculture and on the people who have lost their homes in wildfires.  I don't think we should be feeling too sorry for ourselves.

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

The impact of the drought on skiing, the ski industry, and the Tahoe economy is a fraction of the impact on agriculture and on the people who have lost their homes in wildfires.  I don't think we should be feeling too sorry for ourselves.

 

To be fair the entire nature of a skiing forum is essentially the definition of "first world problem". 

post #4 of 11

My name is Alex and I'm the creator of the movie. I do agree that there are areas in the west struggling much more than Tahoe. From the trailer you don't see it because we try to stay to the point as much as possible but the movie will also cover the California/western region drought as a whole and it's affects on the entire country. There are even a few stories we cover in Southern California about the recent wildfires so we do try to broaden the spectrum because it's such a large issue outside of Lake Tahoe. That being said, I love skiing and I care about the strength of the ski industry so this is the specific perspective I decided to mainly focus on. A lot of the states issues do start with the sierras not having solid snow pack so I thought it would be a different, interesting perspective. We will branch outside of that though. The movie actually has many characters who run ski shops that improved business during the drought years so we do have some interesting stories that are beyond the typical sob story. I'd love to get your suggestions moving forward so if you'd like to contact me send me a message at OneThirdPictures@gmail.com

 

Thanks,

Alex G. 

post #5 of 11

I remember a time in geography & history classes when they taught us that most of the west, CA, NV and AZ was mainly desert where drought conditions are typical in various regions. 

 

But to relate this to the ski industry what I find interesting is how much variation occurs in the snow pack and snowfall. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

edit, added another plot of precipitation detail

 


Edited by jack97 - 9/12/16 at 4:28am
post #6 of 11

In the grand scale of weather & climate, 4-5 years is childs play. 

They say the drought that pushed the natives out of Mesa Verde was 50+ years. 

Who knows what the future holds. 

post #7 of 11

That's a big message of our documentary as well. There have been trees discovered at the bottom of Fallen Leaf Lake and Lake Tahoe meaning there were droughts back in the day that probably lasted for hundreds of years. We have a few meteorologists discussing how drought is something we might just need to get used to because the climate is changing drastically. In years to come this will probably be the common course, unfortunately. But that being said, there's also the flip side of that. In twenty years from now we might be talking about how Lake Tahoe is getting too much moisture and causing floods around the lake, which has happened in the past as well. It's really so unpredictable which makes it pretty interesting to see what will come in the future.  

post #8 of 11

Everyone can also check out our Facebook page and join our group. We'll keep that updated with a lot of new interesting information covering the ongoing drought in the western region. 

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/517790971749791/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by COBillsFan View Post
 

In the grand scale of weather & climate, 4-5 years is childs play. 

They say the drought that pushed the natives out of Mesa Verde was 50+ years. 

 

By the use of proxies, some have concluded that "mega droughts" have occurred in the past, ~ 1000 yrs and another ~ 1000 years before that. Those dates coincide to the medieval and roman warmth period.

 

 

https://www.abqjournal.com/68232/megadroughts-may-recur-in-area.html

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by alexgregory2734 View Post
 

There have been trees discovered at the bottom of Fallen Leaf Lake and Lake Tahoe meaning there were droughts back in the day that probably lasted for hundreds of years. 

 

 

Furthermore, discovery of remnant trees are not isolated to this part of the region, an ancient forest has been discovered in a section of Alaska where a glacier has receded, these tree can date back to past warming periods as well. 

post #10 of 11

Too bad none of us will be around for the next ice age. People will be skiing glaciers around Tahoe in August instead of two turn patches.

 

As far as the Tahoe economy goes, yeah some businesses  failed due to drought, but others have started. Walk down Donner Pass Road in downtown Truckee and you don't see boarded up store fronts, like you do in my hometown of Detroit or numerous other cities and towns across the country. All the ski areas are still in business. Construction is booming (plenty of rich people to buy houses they might live in a week or two a year) and plenty more development in the pipeline, to the chagrin of many. 

The history of the post-Columbian West is the story of boom and bust, and then boom and bust again. For a broader perspective on water and people in the West, try Cadillac Desert or Beyond the Hundreth Meridian.


Edited by oldgoat - 9/13/16 at 9:32am
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Too bad none of us will be around for the next ice age. People will be skiing glaciers around Tahoe in August instead of two turn patches.

 

As far as the Tahoe economy goes, yeah some businesses  failed due to drought, but others have started. Walk down Donner Pass Road in downtown Truckee and you don't see boarded up store fronts, like you do in my hometown of Detroit or numerous other cities and towns across the country. All the ski areas are still in business. Construction is booming (plenty of rich people to buy houses they might live in a week or two a year) and plenty more development in the pipeline, to the chagrin of many. 

The history of the post-Columbian West is the story of boom and bust, and then boom and bust again. For a broader perspective on water and people in the West, try Cadillac Desert or Beyond the Hundreth Meridian.


+1 for Cadillac Desert. Great book! I'll have to look for Beyond the Hundredth Meridian.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Dry Times (Tahoe Drought Documentary)