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Time for new skis, what do i get?!?! [NE / Rockies, expert all-mountain]

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I live on the east coast, have been skiing on a pair of Volkl AC30's for about 10 years, and I am ready for some new skis. I am an expert skier (love steeps, bumps, trees...don't care about jumps/tricks), and I do not mind spending for the best skis I can get. The problem is, I have no idea what to buy. I spend time skiing here in the Northeast every winter, but I also have an Epic pass, and I will ski the Rocky's at least 10 days this winter. As a result, I want a great ski that will work in most any condition. If that doesn't make sense, I wonder if it may be best to use my Volkl's for skiing in icy/bad/north east conditions, and then purchase a pair of straight powder skis. Looking for advice on what I should be considering. 

post #2 of 17
Hard to say without knowing your height weight length of ski you are on now. LP
post #3 of 17

Hi jc007i,

 

Welcome to Epicski!

 

I'm going to edit your thread title (if you don't mind) to advertise better what you're looking for — it usually helps getting replies.

 

In the meantime, this article — http://www.epicski.com/a/five-key-questions-when-buying-new-skis — can help us help you.  Give it a look, post your answers here, and you should get a useful answer.

 

Thanks.

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc007i View Post
 

 I do not mind spending for the best skis I can get.... I wonder if it may be best to use my Volkl's for skiing in icy/bad/north east conditions, and then purchase a pair of straight powder skis. Looking for advice on what I should be considering. 

As mentioned above, your height, wt., etc. will be needed for specific recommendations.  But I can offer some general guidance: 

 

1) If money's not a constraint, you'll probably want two pairs; my preference would be for a carving/mogul-oriented all-mountain ski, and a powder ski (and you can take both on the airlines, just buy a double ski bag).  I wouldn't go out west w/ just a powder ski, since most days you're not going to be skiing powder, unless you're very lucky.

 

2) Skis have changed since your AC30's.  If it were me, I would consider demoing when you go out west (preferably from on-mountain shops so you can swap out during the day).   After several days of that you'd have a much better idea of what you'd like and not (one downside is that narrower carving-oriented skis are hard to find at most shops).  All folks here can do is offer suggestions.  There's no way to know what really works for you until you try them yourself.

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the responses everyone! Here is a bit more info:

 

  1. Where in the world are you skiing? I split my time between the northeast (Maine) and Colorado/Utah.

  2. What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry) I prefer moguls, steeps, and trees. 

  3. How many days a year do you ski? 10-15

  4. How advanced are you as a skier? I consider myself an expert

  5. What's your height and weight? 5' 8" - 165lbs

 

Also, I currently ski on Volkl AC 30's size: 163

post #6 of 17

Ok. So, $ no object, you can start by maybe demoing a Kästle — the FX 85 HP would cover your bases in Maine (bumps, trees, steeps) and work out west, if there'd been no dump. (The price is a little lower on FX than it's been in the past.) It's a great, smooth, silky ski. The HP has excellent grip; the non-HP (no metal), not so much.

 

Last year's sensation, the Nordica Enforcer, is a pretty hot ski. Again, worth a demo. The 100 works for the east (bumps, trees, steeps, and excellent carving), but it's a little wide. The 93, people say, is better here — I haven't skied it. You'll need to dial in a length that works for you. In the 100, maybe the 177? I'm shorter than you by a couple inches and five pounds heavier, and the 177's great — it skis short — but you might want to try the 185. From what I hear, the 93 is a different ski; the same length skis differently.

 

Another ski I've demoed, but don't own, is the Dynastar Powertrack 89. Again, a smooth, strong, and compliant ski — didn't take it in the bumps, though. The Rossi Experience 88 is worth a look, too. Edge grip on both is super.

 

Of course, I'm telling you what I like and what I ski, and I'm no expert, so for sure you'll want to demo. 

 

There are a zillion other worthy skis, and others here will have their preferences.  Keep your eyes open for local demo days.

post #7 of 17

If you are looking for a one ski quiver, you may want to go outside the normal manufacturers, and check out the RMU P802. I got it last season, and it replaced two skis in my quiver, because it did a better job at each aspect than both of the previous skis did individually. I'm a big fan of it. 

post #8 of 17
Is that an 80?
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post

Is that an 80?

The P802 is 96 underfoot. It was made with VT in mind, ergo the 802.

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post

Is that an 80?

The P802 is 96 underfoot. It was made with VT in mind, ergo the 802.


Oh, yeah!  

 

Worth skis are also something to look at, talking local skis. I've heard great things about the Worth Magic. I think they're still around.

post #11 of 17
If you've been on a 30 I would think the cheater category would be the excitement you would look for.
post #12 of 17

It's time to move on from the AC30s, so it seems to me the question is one new ski or two.  I would lean toward two.  A hard snow narrower carver (like a Head Rally) and a wider all-mountain ski that you can use on those days in the east with fresh snow and to take on your trips to the Rockies.  

post #13 of 17

Worth skis closed up shop a while back.

 

OP if money is not object.  Go to the shop in a few weeks and buy what is in stock.


Edited by Maineac - 9/10/16 at 12:45pm
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc007i View Post
 

I wonder if it may be best to use my Volkl's for skiing in icy/bad/north east conditions, sure and then purchase a pair of straight powder skis. Nope

If you can only afford one pair, makes sense to keep your 30's - tuned to 1/3 - for what you mention above, since that's becoming more common in the east. But a "straight powder ski" reveals wishful thinking about a yearly trip west. Yes, you may happen on a dump the same week or 10 days you bought airline tickets for months earlier. Or you may (far more likely) encounter a mix of a few inches of fresh and some days of nothing new. So my advice would be a mid-fat in the high 80's to middle 90's that can handle all those conditions out west - yes, it's quite possible to enjoy boot top powder on a a 90-something ski - and serve as a normal to soft snow ski back east. The new Nordica Enforcer 93 is attracting a lot of attention, the Scott's The Ski is a nice all around for softer snow and bumps, personally I like Kastle FX94's from two years ago that can still be had, all depends on your size and style. (For instance if you're 220, you'll need more width in the trees than 90 mm.) But I question getting a 110 mm ski for 10 days a year out west unless you are the size of a NFL lineman or have an in with the weatherman. 

 

Others will disagree. Spin, that's your cue...:D 

post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post
 

Worth skis closed up shop a while back.

 

 

Bummer.

post #16 of 17
I second beyond's mention of Scott's The Ski. It has been the narrow pair of my two ski travel quiver the past two seasons. You mention bumps first in your preferred conditions, so you are much like me. They are the best all mountain ski I've taken in the bumps, and I've bought three skis in the last several years with that criterion in mind, in response to a thread I started a while back posing the question of what ski(s) are great in the bumps but still do all mountain duty. You might find it useful to peruse it.

http://www.epicski.com/t/124909/what-makes-a-good-bump-ski-for-ordinary-citizens

Edit: The other great skis that came out of that thread were the Head Rock n Rolls. Wider at 95 mm underfoot but, sadly, discontinued. There may be a demo pair out there somewhere, though.

Edit part deux: At the narrower end of the spectrum, Blizzard's Latigo has gotten great reviews for an all mountain ski that's good in bumps. I've not been on them, but still love my Bushwackers, at 10 mm wider, also sadly discontinued.
Edited by cosmoliu - 9/10/16 at 8:04am
post #17 of 17

The FX 85 and 95 were also great bump all mountain skis.   And the older FX 84 also.   

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