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Help choosing new (fast) skis - Page 2

post #31 of 45
I think that's a steal and of course way better than your 5500
post #32 of 45

Not to be a dick, but if you only ski once or twice a year and you've been skiing a very forgiving ski such as the K2 5500 for 25 years, I wouldn't go near a technical GS ski. There are plenty of hard-charging skis out there that will be more user-friendly and enjoyable and still give you those high-speed thrills you are looking for.

post #33 of 45

This thread reminded me of a discussion on what size band aid to put on a gun shot wound. :nono:

post #34 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelly001 View Post

Not to be a dick, but if you only ski once or twice a year and you've been skiing a very forgiving ski such as the K2 5500 for 25 years, I wouldn't go near a technical GS ski. There are plenty of hard-charging skis out there that will be more user-friendly and enjoyable and still give you those high-speed thrills you are looking for.
Such as...
post #35 of 45

I would think you would want to be in a ski that would be stable at racing speeds but not demand the precise setup or technical ability a racing ski asks for. My top pick for you of skis I have owned or demoed would be the Volkl Code L which I think is a perfect ski for you and that's why I sent you the PM. Others for you would be a Volkl Tigershark, Fisher progressor 900. All of these are the top skis just before the racing or cheater racing skis but more all mountain oriented. You will need a very good boot fit to maximize the performance of any good ski. There are many other skis that others can suggest and will work for you but you will not make a mistake buying a ski in this category unless you don't get the boot fit and flex you need. 

 

1. Read How to buy boots on this forum. This will arm you with information you will need. Its is hard to find a good boot fitter but there are some great BSers out there.

2. Armed with your new information visit shops, try on boots and get an idea on what fits.

3. Find swaps in your area starting next month a steal a deal. 

4. Watch out for demo skis on the bay!

post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by harringt0n View Post


Such as...

 

I'll let others recommend specific models.  Those types of skis are not my cup of tea and don't fit my style of skiing (i.e., I don't like going exceedingly fast and prefer off-piste/glades to groomers.)  I just think that based on your style of skiing and the occasional frequency of your outings that a "race" ski may not be the most enjoyable and--possibly--safe choice.  (I also wouldn't venture on a "race" ski without a perfectly fitted and performance-oriented pair of boots.) 

 

Ultimately, you know yourself best. If you trained as a racer and have solid technique, perhaps you are on the right track looking for a beer-league GS ski. 


Good luck.

post #37 of 45
@kelly001, while you may not like it or ski that way, you should really read his original post, he does. Race ski dangerous and un skiable. POPPYCOCK! For those that ski them as daily drivers just for the fun and performance they provide. They actually tend to be very precise and predictable skis ready to perform if the skier is just willing to work just a bit.

My general experience is that whenever I let someone try mine the following happens:

SL's just amazed at the ease of turning compared to anything that they've skied regardless of there ability. Most lower level skiers don't want to give them back.
GS's well a little different here, they don't turn unless correct input is provided and quickly show how errors in technique. Anyone who is an advanced intermediate quickly adapts and enjoys the tracking and edge hold they provide.

I will add both mine are tuned to max edge hold and not very forgiving as a result.

One thing longtime straight skiers do is way over drive modern skis because the of the effort that straight skis required to ski. As a result lower level skis (yes this includes great all mountain and other great skis) feel and perform like crap for them. Change this and adapting to the timing difference of modern skis, well down right difficult (as the ski feels like crap). The race or maybe near race GS skis actually feels and skis like an easy turning straight skis with the straight ski technique. What happens is that you feel younger and better to start, ski a little more aggressive and you carve the first turn correctly by accident. Once this happens you start the learning curve to adapt to recreate that carve. (Take a lesson if possible, or watch Ligedy videos if no lessons are possible. You won't ski like this ever, but just in trying to copy it will put you on the right track).

As mentioned earlier, most skiers down this route will get more dedicated skis for what they want to do. Likely SL, followed if required something to off piste in reactively short order.

@harringt0n, as to boots if your old stuff fits and feels great, get new or good used skis (yes it is ok from certain sellers, PM me and send you a list of a few). However if your boots are old you are borrowed time as the plastic is going to let you down and fail. Look for a good sale and fit and be prepared to buy boots (consider new old stock a year or 3 old). Don't want to lose a season or get injured because of boot failure. Fit is the most important thing here.

Read ScotsSkiers comments about Race skis, likely the best comments as to what works and doesn't.

BTW Levy1 does try different stuff to find the Holy Grail of Skis so keep in contact with him as to what he has to get rid of on occasion. Cheers,
Edited by oldschoolskier - 9/7/16 at 9:37am
post #38 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

@kelly001, while you may not like it or ski that way, you should really read his original post, he does.
 

 

I read his post and while the OP talks about liking to ski fast, there is nothing in there that suggests a racing background. I'm just cautioning that unless he has proper technique, a racing-type ski may not be ideal for someone that skis only "one or twice a year" and is coming from 25 year old straight skis that must be in the noodle category after this many years. If I only have one day per year to ski, I would want a ski that will be immediately rewarding and more user-friendly. And that doesn't mean it can't be a ski that performs best at high speeds and can do the type of long turns the OP is looking for!

 

Quote:
 Originally Posted by oldschoolskier
 View PostRace ski dangerous and un skiable. POPPYCOCK! For those that ski them as daily drivers just for the fun and performance they provide. They actually tend to be very precise and predictable skis ready to perform if the skier is just willing to work just a bit.

 

My point in your own previous response.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

Having skied on straight skis for over 46 years (most of it on race skis) and recently switched to shaped (initially GS and added SL) I speak with a little experience. That said, be forewarned of phantom foot and ACL injures, read up in it, until you change and adjust, catching the inside edge is easy to do, more so with the tighter radius skis if you like going fast. With the newer skis you will also want more skis dedicated to applications.
post #39 of 45
@kelly001,

Let me rephrase this a little more bluntly, I was that skier 4 years ago (kids and other sports at very high levels, including WC)biggrin.gif No I did race unless you include a little in high school. If you are a good skier on straight skis your performance on shaped will be even better. As to the straight skis being noodles my A$$. With proper care they have 40 days on them or in simple terms one season. I still have my first true race skis I purchased 36 years ago and they still perform, the rubber on the 360Ds are starting to show their age.

Anything other than the race skis was crap when I demo'd skis. Just over skied and over powered them. The biggest secret with race skis is matching the brand to your style as brands tend to have certain characteristics.

Yes there are learning curve and risk, hence the warning.

Simply I speak from experience, 51years with 47 of those on straight. For the record 16hrs of adaption over about 40 hours of skiing in the first season.
post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

@kelly001,

Let me rephrase this a little more bluntly, I was that skier 4 years ago (kids and other sports at very high levels, including WC)biggrin.gif No I did race unless you include a little in high school. If you are a good skier on straight skis your performance on shaped will be even better. As to the straight skis being noodles my A$$. With proper care they have 40 days on them or in simple terms one season. I still have my first true race skis I purchased 36 years ago and they still perform, the rubber on the 360Ds are starting to show their age.

Anything other than the race skis was crap when I demo'd skis. Just over skied and over powered them. The biggest secret with race skis is matching the brand to your style as brands tend to have certain characteristics.

Yes there are learning curve and risk, hence the warning.

Simply I speak from experience, 51years with 47 of those on straight. For the record 16hrs of adaption over about 40 hours of skiing in the first season
Actually, you are not that skier.
Neither am I or anyone else who chimes in here. We all know ourselves, but we don't really know the person asking the question. Good advice has been given, it is now up the OP to decide how he wants to proceed.  If he sticks to his budget, whatever he ends up with won't be the end of the world if it doesn't work out. I hope he checks back in with his results on the snow. Can't wait for that to start!
post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

Consider used skis and new boots.

Yup. This. Even a bargain bin ski that's 6 years old will vastly outperform your old 5500s. But you can't shortcut your way to good boots.
post #42 of 45
Thread Starter 
This has been very helpful guys. Thanks a lot. If I end up getting anything I'll post here this winter to let you know how things went. Everyone in this forum has been great.
post #43 of 45

If you are skiing top speeds down anything bigger than 350' vertical speed bump, you should be on at least GS cheater skis, preferably 20 m radius or larger skis.   Whether that (speeding on public pistes) is wise or not, I won't say, but at least be on the right equipment when you do it.

post #44 of 45
post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodSki View Post

Buy mine: http://www.ebay.com/itm/282165074605


Nice skis!

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