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high level skiers and racing background do this... why?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

High level skiers and particularly the one who have racing background, ski with the ski pants like the picture, with the leg gaiter upside down... why is that? why do they want the boot to be free of any lower leg pant cover? I`ve seen it a lot, particularly among high level arc to arc carving skiers...

cheers!

post #2 of 22

Just a guess, because I don't do that, but my guess is they don't want to cut their lower pant legs.

post #3 of 22

They unbuckle and buckle their boots often.  It's easier if the pants are not in the way.  

post #4 of 22
When you get extreme edge angle it is possible for the ski brake on the outside edge of the inner ski to catch on the lower edge of the pants on the other leg and become tangled. This can cause a dangerous loss of control as you exit the turn. I am guessing that is the most likely reason.
post #5 of 22
Done that and it's scary.
post #6 of 22

I think it's what @LiquidFeet said.

post #7 of 22

First time I've ever seen it

post #8 of 22

athletes copy what other athletes do, particularly younger athletes. There is no reason to do this, I unbuckle my boots every run, my pants do not cause a problem with this. Pant legs do not get cut when you are generating bigger angles, look at the photo above, the only part of the pants 'at risk' is the inside of the knee, the 'racer roll' isn't protecting anything. It's sheep copying slightly faster sheep.

post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

athletes copy what other athletes do, particularly younger athletes. There is no reason to do this, I unbuckle my boots every run, my pants do not cause a problem with this. Pant legs do not get cut when you are generating bigger angles, look at the photo above, the only part of the pants 'at risk' is the inside of the knee, the 'racer roll' isn't protecting anything. It's sheep copying slightly faster sheep.

 

This.

post #10 of 22

Obviously, different ski pants have different fit. One pair of ski pants that I have do actually get in the way of handling the buckels of my ski boots. It's just that I don't like the cold air on my legs if I turn the bottoms or gaiters up above the ski boot cuff. So the only time you'll see me with my ski pants pulled up like that is in the lift itself, when my ski boot buckels are open or loosened.

post #11 of 22

I'm not a racer and don't get particularly high edge angles but I do this when using one of my three pairs of skis (blizzard cochise) for the reason mentioned above...my brake lever gets caught under the cuff. I've had some bad wipeouts from it and I'd rather look like a dork than trip over myself at high speed. 

post #12 of 22

I've never had an issue carving arc to arc, but in the bumps with feet close together I have had brakes get caught in holes sliced in my ski pants when worn full length.  Solution 1 was duct tape (covered the slices, added new tape as needed), solution 2 was rolling the pant leg up (kept the inner gator elastic around the top of the boot), now I buy shorter ski pants, or have them hemmed (they as high as the picture, but they do stay out of the way).  Becoming a 1 footed skier unexpectedly mid run is not an experience I want to have again.

post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbo mcs View Post

When you get extreme edge angle it is possible for the ski brake on the outside edge of the inner ski to catch on the lower edge of the pants on the other leg and become tangled. This can cause a dangerous loss of control as you exit the turn. I am guessing that is the most likely reason.


That!

post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by cfr View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbo mcs View Post

When you get extreme edge angle it is possible for the ski brake on the outside edge of the inner ski to catch on the lower edge of the pants on the other leg and become tangled. This can cause a dangerous loss of control as you exit the turn. I am guessing that is the most likely reason.


That!


You don't have to be a high level racer to have this happen.  Long ski pants and brakes that don't retract all the way will do it.  I speak from experience.  

post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

They unbuckle and buckle their boots often.  It's easier if the pants are not in the way.  

I think that's trying to insert a reason where there really isn't one. I've worn Lange RS boots for the last 4 years, and I have short legs that mean my pants will catch in my binding if I don't pull them out of the way. I unbuckle after every single run, and don't have a problem. I buckle and unbuckle through the pants, don't even need to pull them up.

It's a style thing. Whiteroom was spot on. If Mikaela Schiffrin started wearing her pants unzipped all the way to the hip, I guarantee every U14 in the country would be doing it by next week.

And it's been my observation that racers don't flip the gaiter. They just roll the cuff, the gaiter stays in place. I know I flip my gaiter when I take my boots off (again, short legs) to prevent stepping on the bottoms of my pants. But that's a different thing than what I see racers doing. Of course, that could very well vary from place to place.
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

They unbuckle and buckle their boots often.  It's easier if the pants are not in the way.  
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

athletes copy what other athletes do, particularly younger athletes. There is no reason to do this, I unbuckle my boots every run, my pants do not cause a problem with this. Pant legs do not get cut when you are generating bigger angles, look at the photo above, the only part of the pants 'at risk' is the inside of the knee, the 'racer roll' isn't protecting anything. It's sheep copying slightly faster sheep.

65% LiquidFeet, 35% Whiteroom...

Athletes who are gate training will have their boots cranked down pretty firmly to get performance & responsiveness during their run.
But boots that tight are uncomfortable for the chair ride back up, so they like to loosen them off then.
It's a convenience to just open them up without fully releasing the bales, then they go easily back to the same race position at the top of the next training run.
If they're training in full pants, it adds to this convenience to roll the pants out of the way, and they usually get left like that.

Does it work? Sure...

Required? Not at all...so there's my nod to Whiteroom.

And of course percentages can vary based on local style preferences smile.gif
post #17 of 22
I used to do this, now don't. Primary reason at the time was: bc my plug boots are cool looking. Now... I do cut up my pants but I dont really have any issues with buckling/unbuckling.
post #18 of 22

I have cut my ski pants, and I have (twice even) caught my ski pant cuff on a ski break. 

It just occurred to me that some tight fitting ski pants may not have sufficient room for the battery pack of the heated boots.

post #19 of 22

As a short, stocky, racer guy who needs large pants, I agree with the too long inseam issue.  That is part of it.  That said, the answer is buckling and unbuckling.  This is often why racers train in training shorts or have zip off pants - aerodynamics, shin guard fit, and boot tweaking.  Also obviously easy strip down to GS suit for timed training and competitions.  Shorts keep the major muscles warm, provide modesty, and afford some protection.  One of my new favorite race kit clothing items for women are the puffy down mini-skirts available.  I am jealous.  

 

I never understood people who do not unbuckle boots between runs.  These are often the same people who suffer from foot cramps and cold feet. Buckling up to the max in the lodge and dealing with it all day is a a mystery.  If you can do this, your boots do not fit you right.

 

Boots can also change their characteristics depending on temperature.  Cold boot will be stiff but soften during training.  Warm boots will be soft and stiffen in cold temps.  We also encourage athletes to train some drills with boots very loosely buckled to encourage more ankle flexion.  Some coaches insist on  completely unbuckled. but I do not like any loose hardware flapping about.  

 

Reminder too that racers train very little in deep powder.  Obviously when skiing in anything deeper than a few inches, roll down the cuff and powder cuff or have wet feet.

 

In conclusion....cool kids who rip courses, hardpack, and groomers cuff, pull up their pants, and wear helmets.

post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by pat View Post
 

I never understood people who do not unbuckle boots between runs.  These are often the same people who suffer from foot cramps and cold feet. Buckling up to the max in the lodge and dealing with it all day is a a mystery.  If you can do this, your boots do not fit you right.

 


Or they fit perfectly. 

post #21 of 22

Sure sure let's go with that. ...:)

post #22 of 22

Also worth noting: from my limited experience it would appear that less than 0.0001 % of skiers have perfectly fitting boots.:D

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