or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › 2017 Volkl Mantra VS 100Eight ?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

2017 Volkl Mantra VS 100Eight ?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Hey gang, I'm trying to decide between the new Volkl Mantra and 100Eight. Anyone try them both and have some guidance you can share?

 

I'm an ex-racer from younger days, and now in my 40's just cruise, chase my kids around (holy heck, my teenage son skis fast now!), enjoy glades, try to focus on powder days for the most part, tend to stay out of the bumps unless it's been dumped on overnight. I like a light-feeling ski so they can be tossed around quickly in tight trees or steeps when needed. Current skis are Head Rock 'n Rolls, love 'em, just looking for something that skis similarly but has a bit more float when it's deep. Son skis on Volkls, and I'm switching back to them for this season (used to race on 'em in my previous life).

 

So how does the new/'17 Mantra and 100Eight compare on-snow (not just specs on paper)?

 

If one's heavier and carves hard stuff better (Mantra I'm guessing), but the other feels more light and playful (100Eight again, guessing since it's lacking the metal of the Mantra), I'll go for the lighter more playful one. I'd assume they are similar in terms of float in deep/fresh stuff. 

 

Thank you for firsthand insights, much appreciated. :)

post #2 of 19

I don't have any experience on snow with either of those skis but if you wanted: 1. A volkl and 2. a lighter and more playful ski, you might want to consider the Volkl 90Eight instead of the Mantra, much more similar construction to the 100Eight than the Mantra

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pile View Post
 

I don't have any experience on snow with either of those skis but if you wanted: 1. A volkl and 2. a lighter and more playful ski, you might want to consider the Volkl 90Eight instead of the Mantra, much more similar construction to the 100Eight than the Mantra

 

Thank you. Reason I'm comparing Mantra and 100Eight is because they are different in a few ways, but both have enough surface area to float well in powder. The 90Eight is narrower, closer to what I have now, and I'd like to go a bit bigger.

post #4 of 19

I have both the R&Rs (166cm) and the 100Eights (172cm) and love them both. I'm 5'8" and 140#. I've never owned Mantras of any generation, so can't speak to those. I like a light, quick ski as I favor the bumps over groomers when there is no powder. My choice in skis these days has settled into being heavily influenced by how they do in bumps. I only have about 3 days on the 100Eights as I bought them at the end of the season, so my impressions aren't deep. The 100Eights have more float, of course, being 13mm wider underfoot, and I find them to be a perfect fit into the wide slot in my two ski travel quiver. They replace the Gotamas I skied for five seasons and I find them better in pretty much every parameter. And I have to say that the Gotamas were my all time favorite skis of the last 30 years. They motor through spring glop better than the R&Rs and feel more stable at speed. The R&Rs are quicker, more reactive, but they also are shorter. For their width and target conditions, I find the 100Eights plenty quick, though. The R&Rs occupy kind of an odd position in my overall quiver, as they are in between skis I really prefer in the bumps and skis I really prefer in powder. That said, the R&Rs are the skis I would take with me if someone held a gun to my head and said I could only travel with one pair of skis. One ski quiver, I guess. As it is for right now, they get thrown in the back of the car when I drive up to Mammoth for the weekend and have the luxury of taking along as many pairs of skis as I want. I'd say that the 100Eights could be a one ski quiver if the ice/hard pack end of the spectrum were to be written off. 

 

Not sure those random thoughts help much with the questions posed in the OP, but they are what come to mind. 

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmoliu View Post


Not sure those random thoughts help much with the questions posed in the OP, but they are what come to mind. 

Thanks, that's very helpful.

I was wondering if the 100Eight skis like a wider, better floating R&R; sounds like the answer might be "sort of", with the caveat that they don't hold a carve as well on hard pack?

Hard to characterize skis, especially such versatile ones. When I first found the R&R's, I was pretty amazed at how much they did well.
post #6 of 19

Yes, it's almost like the R&Rs share a family resemblance with the 100Eights. Before reading ^^^ I was just thinking that the 100Eights ski a lot like  R&Rs, only wider. They both hold an edge better than one would think they should. Both are very quick considering their width. What got me on to the R&Rs, in fact, was a thread I started a couple of years ago asking what non-dedicated bump skis are good in the bumps. I know you stated above that you aren't particularly interested in the bumps, but I have found both skis very responsive there. My demo morning on the 100Eights last January took me from totally untracked knee high pow to crud, to hard pack and bumps. I thought for a 108 mm ski they excelled in each of those to a greater extent than I had any right to expect. It was love at first sight. 

 

Speaking of the Mantras, a friend of mine slays all of Park City mountain on the new Mantras (for bumps I'm thinking specifically of Thanes run) usually traveling at Mach 1. But, he's a way better skier than I am. I know the new Mantras are very different from earlier versions, but my initial impression some 10 years ago of the Mantras I tried as being stiff and demanding has probably permanently colored my view of the ski. On the other hand, with the R&Rs already in my quiver, having displaced a pair Bonafides from that slot, I really have not been in the market for a high-90s ski in the time since the new Mantras were introduced. 

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmoliu View Post
 

Yes, it's almost like the R&Rs share a family resemblance with the 100Eights. Before reading ^^^ I was just thinking that the 100Eights ski a lot like  R&Rs, only wider. They both hold an edge better than one would think they should. Both are very quick considering their width. What got me on to the R&Rs, in fact, was a thread I started a couple of years ago asking what non-dedicated bump skis are good in the bumps. I know you stated above that you aren't particularly interested in the bumps, but I have found both skis very responsive there. My demo morning on the 100Eights last January took me from totally untracked knee high pow to crud, to hard pack and bumps. I thought for a 108 mm ski they excelled in each of those to a greater extent than I had any right to expect. It was love at first sight. 

 

Speaking of the Mantras, a friend of mine slays all of Park City mountain on the new Mantras (for bumps I'm thinking specifically of Thanes run) usually traveling at Mach 1. But, he's a way better skier than I am. I know the new Mantras are very different from earlier versions, but my initial impression some 10 years ago of the Mantras I tried as being stiff and demanding has probably permanently colored my view of the ski. On the other hand, with the R&Rs already in my quiver, having displaced a pair Bonafides from that slot, I really have not been in the market for a high-90s ski in the time since the new Mantras were introduced. 

 

My concern with the Mantras is that they may be more stable, but a little heavier and more work than I'm willing to take on. I know the R&R's aren't a Super G ski, but they go as fast as I ever want to go (probably faster than I should ski sometimes!). If the light, playful R&R's are stable enough, I don't feel compelled to get something more stable, just something as playful but even more so in the soft stuff if I'm smart and lucky enough to time the ski trips well. 

If the 100Eight skis sort of like the R&R, but just with more real estate to surf the pow, they could be a great solution for a small upgrade for me. And although I don't think of myself as a bump skier, after some fresh pow, I did find myself having a blast bopping down the big bumps at Ninety-nine 90 at Park City last year. I was pretty amazed. Was thinking to myself, "Hey, these are huge bumps, and I'm having fun, is this really me?" :)

 

P.S. I used to ski long, metal-layered Super G's as my go-anywhere skis in earlier days, and just forced them to do whatever I wanted. Nowadays, while I'm fit from cycling and still love to ski fast, I really don't like to work hard. I'm a lazy skier now. Or at least, I aspire to be. :D

post #8 of 19

Well, I can say that the friend I mentioned above also has a racing background. In fact, since he's retired and has bought himself a house in Park City (More like died and gone to heaven) the last time I skied with him he was signed up for and getting out for the daily Master's Racing program at Park City. He's really an excellent skier and is a very big fan of the new Mantras. 

 

Edit: He said he didn't care for previous versions of the Mantra, if I remember correctly.

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmoliu View Post
 

Well, I can say that the friend I mentioned above also has a racing background. In fact, since he's retired and has bought himself a house in Park City (More like died and gone to heaven) the last time I skied with him he was signed up for and getting out for the daily Master's Racing program at Park City. He's really an excellent skier and is a very big fan of the new Mantras. 

 

Ha, that may actually have convinced me not to go the Mantra direction, because I'm such a different skier from what I once was as a racer. If I have only one pair of skis, I'll lean in a direction away from racing feel and more toward easy all-around, light, playful (with the ability to warp once in a while). I guess that matches with my boycott on getting older, and instead getting younger and more playful, myself. At least, that's what I'm doing in my mind. :D

post #10 of 19
Well, in that case:



That book has been recommended in several threads here and I have to say that it has transformed my thinking about ageing "successfully". Highly recommended.

Yeah, by most accounts, it seems that the Mantra, even the newest version, is not a ski to fall asleep on. In contrast, I would say that the 100Eights, for all they are capable of, are fairly laid back. As laid back as Volkls can be, that is rolleyes.gif
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmoliu View Post

Well, in that case:



That book has been recommended in several threads here and I have to say that it has transformed my thinking about ageing "successfully". Highly recommended.

Yeah, by most accounts, it seems that the Mantra, even the newest version, is not a ski to fall asleep on. In contrast, I would say that the 100Eights, for all they are capable of, are fairly laid back. As laid back as Volkls can be, that is rolleyes.gif

 

Hadn't heard of that, will have to pick it up. Thanks! :)

I think I'll try to demo the 100Eights over the Dec holidays swapping out with my R&Rs back to back. If I do that, will post up some impressions. Of the skis. Not my Jimmy Stewart or my Rodney Dangerfield. 

post #12 of 19

I own a pair of 2015 Mantras, and I demoed the 100Eights last year.

 

The Mantras are definitely heavier, and will leave you worn out after a day of tighter trees and/or bumps.  They hold an edge surprisingly well and can bust through crud and crust like butter.  They are not a true powder ski, but I managed to get first tracks down Lorelei Trees at Taos one time after about 30 inches of fresh snow (Snowpocalypse in Feb 2015), and I can assure you I wasn't complaining about my skis lacking float at the end of the run.  :)  A great one-quiver ski.

 

The 100Eights are lighter and a bit more lively.  I was lucky enough to ski them in about 6-8 inches of fresh, so I am not sure how they'd do in more standard packed/groomed conditions, but I can say they were a barrel of fun on fresh snow.  They were softer than the mantras, obviously, but still stiff enough that I wouldn't exactly call them forgiving.  I view this ski as "Mantra-lite", and based on your description of wants/needs, I'd say this is the one for you.

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by clong83 View Post
 

I own a pair of 2015 Mantras, and I demoed the 100Eights last year.

 

The Mantras are definitely heavier, and will leave you worn out after a day of tighter trees and/or bumps.  They hold an edge surprisingly well and can bust through crud and crust like butter.  They are not a true powder ski, but I managed to get first tracks down Lorelei Trees at Taos one time after about 30 inches of fresh snow (Snowpocalypse in Feb 2015), and I can assure you I wasn't complaining about my skis lacking float at the end of the run.  :)  A great one-quiver ski.

 

The 100Eights are lighter and a bit more lively.  I was lucky enough to ski them in about 6-8 inches of fresh, so I am not sure how they'd do in more standard packed/groomed conditions, but I can say they were a barrel of fun on fresh snow.  They were softer than the mantras, obviously, but still stiff enough that I wouldn't exactly call them forgiving.  I view this ski as "Mantra-lite", and based on your description of wants/needs, I'd say this is the one for you.

 

That's also great input, thanks very much. I'm thinking the same thing, 100Eight may be the ticket.

post #14 of 19

I can't add much to this - but I have observed that the mantras are a very polarizing ski. Several of my guy friends own them are ski them all the time - on icy groomers and in powder and talk about the impressive edge hold and float. I also know several people who tried them and hated them - my SO was one of them. He's mid-40s expert skier and couldn't get over how heavy they felt and how much work they were. All this to say that the new mantra is definitely a ski you want to try - I wouldn't buy them without demoing. The 108s though I think have been much more generally well-received. 

post #15 of 19

Heaviness is definitely my main complaint about them.  They can really leave me worn out at the end of the day.  If I ski multiple days in a row, I usually have to mix up my ski choice a little bit because skiing on Mantras for 2-3 days straight is tough.

post #16 of 19
I'm not a mantra fan either (blizzard bonefide rock), 108 was fun, look at the confession , one of my top picks at sia this year
post #17 of 19

Just another thought on the new(ish) Mantra. I skied them in deep powder yesterday and was very impressed. They floated nicely, surfy, turned on a dime, and had the usual rock solid GS hold on the runouts. I'd skied the previous generations in pow- including the very first (which was considered fat...) and this was by far the best. If I could only have one pair of skis this would be a contender. I have powder skis on the rack, Soul 7s, VW Katanas and Nordica "Unleashed Hells" (well, lighter Patrons...) so it compares well with all three, not that I'd substitute on a pure powder day, but in a pinch, with unexpected pow, they skied beautifully.

post #18 of 19

Having demoed the 100eight's at Okemo last March, I was impressed how quick and playful the ski was and how well it held an edge when the softer snow got pushed away. I also thought, this will be the replacement for my Gotama's

 

I would get the 100eights over the Mantra's seeing where you live  and ski.

post #19 of 19

I skied the 100eights at a Colo Demo last year, on a 3" fresh plus corduroy day.   They carved in the typical great Volkl way, in either the fresh or groomers; seemed to do 3D conditions well, with what there was of it; and they were lighter, more responsive and quicker than any other fattish, non-slalom radius ski I've been on.   Since you like a fast, quick ski, this would probably work well.

 

I've only skied previous Mantras, and for me they are a lot of (unnecessary) work.  I too have a racing background in my youth, and I still like to alternate between driving fast and laid back skiing, but not on the old Mantras.  Since I've heard the new ones were better but still heavy and more work, I haven't tried them.  

 

This year I demoed the 90eight and found it a much more ordinary ski than the 100eight, more forgettable.   But the 100eight stands out.  I'd love to try it in deeper conditions and chop.  As long as you like light and quick with a reliable carve, while not being unstable, this ski sounds like a good fit, to me.  

 

(I still like the old damp Gotamas, which the 100eights have now fully replaced - as of this year - a real loss, IMH0.  I know several people who have stockpiled extra Gotamas just in case this happened.)   

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › 2017 Volkl Mantra VS 100Eight ?