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Boot tech; are they evolving like/with ski tech?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Starting to think about new boots for the upcoming season and you see /read a lot about ski development in the past five to 10 years w/single rocker, 2x rocker, triple camber, twin tips, reverse rocker, etc.  But, you don't see / read much about boot developments and how boots evolve to compliment / enhance your experience with new ski types (i.e. 2x rockered ski). I would think a boot matched to a foot and ski might be appropriate as your position (upright vs. forward) is different on different types of skis.

 

Does this make sense?  I run skis w/tip and tail rocker, camber underfoot and was wondering if I should try to match to boots (after finding a fit for a low volume, skinny calf-lower leg, high arch, 170# aggressive skier, likes to walk on the beach in the moonlight, sip tequila, wind blowing in my hair, :rolleyes )?

 

Thoughts/ideas?

post #2 of 13

Bump.

post #3 of 13
Quote:

Originally Posted by sfo1 View Post
 

 

Thoughts/ideas?

 

 

Boot technology moves at a much slower pace than skis.  Just match the boot to your feet. 

Skis may change 3-4 times over the lifespan of your boots.

post #4 of 13
THe evolution has been to flatter ramp angles and more upright cuffs. This might be good for a skier... but it might not. In the end, the boot interfacing with the skier is much more critical than the boot interfacing with a ski, as was said above.
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

THe evolution has been to flatter ramp angles and more upright cuffs. This might be good for a skier... but it might not. In the end, the boot interfacing with the skier is much more critical than the boot interfacing with a ski, as was said above.

A lot of boots seem to be evolving to fit the skis that are best skiied from a more centered (vs. tip driving position). I can imagine them being less ideal for more traditional skis so hopefully people know their preferences.

 

The biggest evolution in boots in the last 5-10 years is in the touring boot category. You now have really light boots with incredible range of motion that ski passably well. You also have boots that can legitimately double as an alpine boot (though not a really high performance one by most accounts) while still being decent enough for some short touring laps. That''s a pretty big jump.

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post
 

A lot of boots seem to be evolving to fit the skis that are best skiied from a more centered (vs. tip driving position). I can imagine them being less ideal for more traditional skis so hopefully people know their preferences.

If by traditional skis you mean cambered shape skis, note that race boots have also, on average, moved to a more upright cuff with a flatter bootboard.  

 

But, getting back to the OP:  As Whiteroom said, what's critical is that you personally be balanced in your boots.  This means both laterally and fore-aft.  Many things go into this but, just as an example, everything else being equal, taller skiers tend to have larger femur:tibia ratios, and thus actually tend to need more cuff lean and more ramp than shorter skis (again, this is just a simplistic example to illustrate that a more upright boot might not work for everyone).


Edited by chemist - 8/20/16 at 9:50pm
post #7 of 13
Relating to chemist's point, as a taller skier at 6'6", I have enjoyed the Lange RX/RS series of boots. I thought these were fairly upright in line with newer designs but I have no idea how they really compare to other brands. I suppose there could be a tendency to get in the backseat.
post #8 of 13

I believe boot fitting has improved over the years so that certainly has a bearing on boots, the boots may have improved slowly but getting a good fit in the correct boot for your foot/leg makes a big difference. The conversation used to be "I want the brand X boot or I want brand Y boot". now a good boot fitter will tell you which boots that will fit your foot.

 

Phil says "your marry your boots but date your skis". If you have not had modern boots fitted by a modern boot fitter you need to.

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post

Relating to chemist's point, as a taller skier at 6'6", I have enjoyed the Lange RX/RS series of boots. I thought these were fairly upright in line with newer designs but I have no idea how they really compare to other brands. I suppose there could be a tendency to get in the backseat.


Not familiar with the RX, but the RS is definitely upright (unless you use the spoiler!); indeed, my alignment specialist considers it among the more upright boots in its category.


Edited by chemist - 8/21/16 at 7:24pm
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post


Not familiar with the RX, but the RS is definitely upright (unless you use the spoiler!); indeed, my alignment specialist considers it among the more upright boots in its category.

Well, there you go! I have skinnier feet and calves so left the RS spoiler in to take up some volume. I didn't notice it's effect on my forwardness. I'll try pulling it out this season to experiment. The RX is the all-mountain version.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post


Not familiar with the RX, but the RS is definitely upright (unless you use the spoiler!); indeed, my alignment specialist considers it among the more upright boots in its category.

Well, there you go! I have skinnier feet and calves so left the RS spoiler in to take up some volume. I didn't notice it's effect on my forwardness. I'll try pulling it out this season to experiment. The RX is the all-mountain version.

I had the same issue--needed the spoilers for fit, until I got some Intuition Powerwraps which take up more space around my calf. The main symptom of too much forward lean is sore quads in powder. The Intuitions have helped that a lot. (Took a little getting used to--the wrap itself acts as a front spoiler so between the wrap and no rear spoiler I found myself having to recover from getting back on my skis. A small heel wedge fixed that. 

I think the main advance in boot technology IMO is more fitting options--moldable liners and shells, rigid foam, etc.  Somewhere out there is a technical innovation equivalent to wider, shaped skis. Someday someone will come up with it and it will seem just as obvious in retrospect. Hope I live long enough.

post #12 of 13

High end boots haven't really changed since the Nordica Grand Prix days... Someone surely will point out that some are lighter now, some are more comfy, Fischer even has a slightly different stance... but in terms of what really works its the same basic formula. (Call me jaded) 

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Penguin View Post

High end boots haven't really changed since the Nordica Grand Prix days... Someone surely will point out that some are lighter now, some are more comfy, Fischer even has a slightly different stance... but in terms of what really works its the same basic formula. (Call me jaded) 

This!
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