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Should I try skiing in the East again? - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

Drive to Colorado.  It won't be much more expensive than the east and the chances of it being good, are much greater.

Do you really want to take that much of a chance,  on your one week a year trip?

 

At age 69 if you are retired and have time then this is a good and potentially economical suggestion, especially if you have a companion or two to share driving and gas costs. But you kind of have to be the kind of person who likes the open road, which I am. I have done the East-West drive a half dozen times in the last ten years and only once had a brief delay due to snowy roads coming or going. You can stick to well-maintained interstates, practically to the ticket windows. If you do this I'd suggest Beaver Creek for moderate crowds and groomers, although it's not cheapest. Loveland has nice groomers on slightly smaller scale and could be done cheaply if you buy preseason four-packs of lift tickets. If you drive to the Northeast and want to limit miles then perhaps consider Gore Mtn, NY (9:15 hrs) or Mt. Snow, VT (10:15 hrs). They are good groomer mtns and a little easier to get to from points south and west. I've always had a soft spot for Killington from several visits back in the 70s and 80s. I'm sure you'd have fun again there too.
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

I really like Sunday River. I had one of the best instructors I have ever had. The week was just OK but not for groomer ripping that week. Had the conditions been better that week I am sure I would have enjoyed it. Especially the run called Rogue Angel. 

Agree on the SR instructors. I can see why you liked Rogue Angel if you like to rip groomers. I actually liked Northern Lights and Airglow more than it, but really liked the rollers and interesting terrain on Excalibur. And they left Lollapalooza ungroomed after the blizzard with crud and bumps everywhere, so I practiced and put my lessons to good use.
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

I see Stratton has a nice set of trees. Don't know how dense they are but I always wanted to learn tree skiing. I have a brand new set of MX 88. Might just be the ticket.

Stratton has lots of excellent glades including 3 mellow glades where you can start to get used to skiing trees. The easiest and shortest is Emerald Forest. It is off Hemlock on the lower mountain and it was our kids first glade. For a truly long, yet mellow pitch, you need to make your all the way over to skiers left on the mountain to West Pilot off Work Road and West Meadow. In a normal year, the snow will be excellent and there is usually not a lot of traffic. The 3rd choice is Eclipse. It is to the right off the Sunrise HS6 in the Sun Bowl. It is right next to Lower Downeaster. It is steeper than the other 2. Skiing these 3 glades will make you comfortable with tree skiing.

 

Gore is another choice for cruising and also has a lot of great glade choices. Gore is always less crowded than anything in SVT. The lodging around Gore is also less expensive than SVT.

post #34 of 42
Been skiing east for years have visited many east coast mountains. Live here in Buckeye state if i go up east I travel as far as White Face Mt. Love that place on snow day like Easter 2015. My resort of choice for skiing and 5hrs dive on powder days or weekend trips is Snowshoe hands down pass deals are same price at my local hill if you buy early, and it snows more than most people think on that mountain.
post #35 of 42

Levy, the lift for Spruce Peak fell apart this summer.  That might impact skiing at Sunday River.

It's the lift that accesses two major blue groomers, American Express and Risky Business.

You can follow the conversation about this lift here:

 

http://forums.alpinezone.com/showthread.php/138335-Spruce-Triple-Sunday-River-ME

post #36 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

 

I can get some great high speed runs at 7 Springs in PA. You have to watch the weather as it can become marginal quick. That's on a 750 vertical hill. The West side has great long, wide cruising runs for the east. I go to Holiday Valley quite a bit and that is a great place for a long pair of slalom skis but no wide long groomers and to crowded if you could put one together. I have been told many times to go another hour past Holiday Valley and ski Bristol which will be what I am looking for and I will do that this year. But I still want to take a week of skiing in the east which will cut my week long trip in half money wise.I can pay $1700 and go out west but I am thinking of doing a little racing this year with our ski club and it is expensive. I can book a week at Killington for $500, 5 nights, 5 days of skiing and a 5 mile drive to the slopes or go to Stratton for $700 ski in-out and a ski town. BTW are you talking out Bear Mountain in CA? At 69 I do not want to do  any poling! Is Flatten that bad?

 

Levy, I've been skiing SVT since 1978. I usually put in about 50+ days per season (including about 3 trip out west every year). I had a season pass at Stratton for 26 years prior to my defection to Killington for seven seasons. So I know both area very well. I still do about 15 days in SVT in December before my annual westward migration around new years day.

 

The terrain and bumps at Killington are more interesting. But lots of cross trails and merges. Not a good match for high spped.

The best high speed groomers at Killington is under the Skye Peak and the Neeles eye chairs. Bear Mountain (one of the peaks at Killington) does not have any groomers worth talking about. Unless they groomed Wild Fire (not too often).    

 

If you are only looking for high speed groomers, Stratton is much better bet. During the weekdays, there is no one on the hill. There are a few retirees in the morning along with the racers from the Stratton Mountain School. The racers stay mainly on North American (Frank's Fall Line) and Suntanner. The AARP folks are are gone by lunch time and so are the racers. You'll have the place all to yourself. When we ski weekdays there, we often have a pick of gondola cabins. There is no one there in a weekday afternoon.  

 

Almost all the runs at Stratton are groomed. There are hand full of exceptions - Grizzly Bear, Bear Down, Lift Line and World Cup. 

 

If you are interested in more details, send me a PM. 

PM sent

post #37 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by troyboy View Post

Been skiing east for years have visited many east coast mountains. Live here in Buckeye state if i go up east I travel as far as White Face Mt. Love that place on snow day like Easter 2015. My resort of choice for skiing and 5hrs dive on powder days or weekend trips is Snowshoe hands down pass deals are same price at my local hill if you buy early, and it snows more than most people think on that mountain.

Snowshoe gets some really big dumps. To tight for cruising but a fun mountain to ski.

post #38 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Here's another one given your location.., I'm going to take a flyer on this one, but it will save you money, and the nearby towns are really nice.., why not do a Boyne, Boyne Highlands, Nubs Nob (MI) tour? Stay In Petoskey, or if you don't mind about an hour drive, Traverse City for good food, entertainment, and things to do. Not big hills, but pretty impeccable grooming and it's highly unlikely you'll ever see more than several inches of new, but nice light lake effect snow on top of lots of man made stuff.

Boyne can get some nice snow!

post #39 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

I see Stratton has a nice set of trees. Don't know how dense they are but I've always wanted to learn to ski trees. I have a brand-new mx88 might be just the ticket
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

MX-88 is not a good tree ski. The flat square tail does not like to slip.
I have a pair. Good groomer ski. For off piste, there are much better choices.   
I bought it to ski crud and replace my Kendo's which is where I hope it will shine. What are your recommendations for tree skis.

 

Levy, I am responding to the stuff you put up, your preferences and what not. I try not to impose my preferences in my recommendations. Well, not too much anyway. 

 

You have an utmost preference to groomers and I respect and understand that. I like groomers too, just not all the time. :D 

Finances - that is why you want to try the east. Good deals during mid-week and reduced travel time. This is a constrain we all experience. Unless I hit the powerball jackpot, then let's all go skiing and enjoy a endless winter. $700 for 5 days of skiing and slope side lodging is pretty good deal.  

Most of my recommendation are based on your preference to groomer and bang for buck. Hence Stratton over Killington.   

If we can remove the constraint of finance then Markojp's recommendation on Sun Valley is dead on. Just make sure you bring a good pair of GS skis. 3.4K of non-stop gorgeous groomers that will put the widest smile on your face. Almost good enough for you to give up sex. You do remember sex, right? :D 

Just kidding.     

 

Ski wise, the MX-88 is a great feeling ski. That is my go to ski when I ski Stratton. Unless it's reallllly firm then I'm on my Atomic FIS SL. Every time I take my Kendo out at Stratton, I always wish for the MX-88 unless there is a ton of fresh snow on the ground then I  generally opt for something wider. The Kendo is also much better in 3D snow and terrian than the MX-88. However, there is a dearth of 3D snow and terrain at Stratton. For Killington, I usually run my Kendo (pre 2016 models).       

 

For the record, I like trees, but I don't particularly like the trees at Stratton, still too much hidden rocks for my liking and the lines that generally develop in the trees are not smooth and rhythmic with the exception of some off the Shooting Star chair.

 

Taken into consideration your preference for groomer and abhorrence for 3D snow and terrain, I don't see why you would even want to try trees at all. I usually think of eastern trees as an combo of 3D terrain with immovable obstacles with 3D snow thrown in the mix on occasion. Truth be told, most skiers are in the trees for the romance. Before you really try to ski trees, try skiing bumps first. Usually that's when the light bulb goes on. May take a bit longer due to age and the federal mandated switch over to CFL.     

 

Tree skis for the east, my pick would be a FIS SL. Just to handle the usual short choppy lines that are found in there. Some of those line would not fit a full sized ski. For out west, My usual go to tree ski is the older cambered Kendo. Last season I switched to the Volkl Mantra, and loved it. The new Mantra is not your father's Mantra (had 2 pairs). The new Mantra have no camber and both slight tip and tail rocker. It slips really well in tight bumps and trees. Opens up lots of options in line choices. It did lose some of its balls on the groomer. Have to drive it a bit harder on the groom to get the same pop as the older versions.

 

OH, before I forget. Stratton patrols are used to the SMS racers speeding down in control and are really good about high speed cruising. They will still pull your pass for skiing out of control. They are pretty good at knowing the difference. Killington patrol, I don't think there is any. :cool 

 

In conclusion - go to Startton, have a ball and save a bundle of money for Sun Valley next year.          

 

P.S. Levy, I really like you. Still looking for change and pushing your limits at your age. Thumbs Up  

Every time I talk to a great Eastern skier, like HellavaSkier, OLdschool,  you and others  there is usually a mention about using a slalom ski in the east. Hey, who wants to do the turney thing all day, not me! So last year I demoed a Head Rebel Slalom, 165, mind you I was on a 300 ft vertical here in Ohio but I just could not get that thing to chatter as fast as I could go and it did not dictate the turn. I had so much fun I bought it in a 170 thinking you guys might know something. Scotskier is still mad at me for going the 170 length but I tought it might be perfect ! I also bought a Atomic FIS 158 for some ski club racing I hope to do. Maybe the SL 170 is going to be the ticket for the tighter Eastern hills! I also bought the Head Rebel GS in a 180 for the cruise. Both skis blew me away at the demo. Now both are sitting in my basement at a very reduced price:D

I love my 2013 Kendo and I can hang it out for speed but I thought I would try the MX88, Also sitting in my basement and a great deal over the summer. Thanks for all your help. 

Fred

post #40 of 42
Quote:

Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

 

Every time I talk to a great Eastern skier, like HellavaSkier, OLdschool,  you and others  there is usually a mention about using a slalom ski in the east. Hey, who wants to do the turney thing all day, not me! So last year I demoed a Head Rebel Slalom, 165, mind you I was on a 300 ft vertical here in Ohio but I just could not get that thing to chatter as fast as I could go and it did not dictate the turn. I had so much fun I bought it in a 170 thinking you guys might know something. Scotskier is still mad at me for going the 170 length but I tought it might be perfect ! I also bought a Atomic FIS 158 for some ski club racing I hope to do. Maybe the SL 170 is going to be the ticket for the tighter Eastern hills! I also bought the Head Rebel GS in a 180 for the cruise. Both skis blew me away at the demo. Now both are sitting in my basement at a very reduced price:D

I love my 2013 Kendo and I can hang it out for speed but I thought I would try the MX88, Also sitting in my basement and a great deal over the summer. Thanks for all your help. 

Fred

 

By Jove, I think you've got it. You ski the ski, not the other way around.

The Atomic FIS SL 158 will blow the Kendo into the weed any day.    

 

Have fun. 

post #41 of 42

Levy,

 

Totally feel you on the cost thing. I actually did Killington mid-march this past year for spring break to cut down on costs. I also probably live within 20 minutes of you in Columbus grew up skiing Mad River, Snow Trails and the dearly departed Clear Fork so i can vouch it is a minimum 10 hour drive for us. I must say if you are looking for top to bottom groomer conditions the earlier post about having many transitions at Killington is dead on. Almost every trail has a traverse running right through the middle of it. As for conditions I pray that what i experienced is nothing close to what you will have. Stratton is a great bet and when you do head out west again I think Copper Mountain would be right up your alley from my past experience there.

post #42 of 42
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I am going to Stratton. I appreciate your information. We do a lot of skiing at Holiday Valley, 7 Springs and Snowshoe and belong to the Columbus Ski Club. I am thinking of getting back into racing with them this year just to get free race coaching this year. I haven't run any gates for many years but I but I will have a great handicap at 68:D
Fred
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