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Tuning and Waxing Video

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I decided I would like to give tuning and waxing a try this winter. I will use a pair of my older skis to learn on. Looking for suggestions on highly regarded videos on tuning and waxing. I looked around YouTube and the videos are endless and techniques different. Being new to this I am looking for suggestions on the good videos for beginners.
post #2 of 9

Liberty is your home mountain, yes?   

Waxing is nowhere nearly as important as edge sharpness management.   

 

More important for waxing is "What is a reasonable level of effort you want to put in?" - a highly regarded video might show a level of work that is simply not worth it for your time/effort/reward balance.   If you're having a hard time deciding which video to follow, you'll have just as hard a time deciding which part of any specific video to adapt to your specific situation.     And then there's what you plan on using.

If you plan on using Swix waxes, go to swix school videos - and use waxes one colour grade harder than Swix recommend because Liberty gets a far larger proportion of manmade snow than Norway.   The Swix school videos apply in a general sense to Toko users and Holmenkol users, just ask if you have questions.

If you plan on using Dominator waxes, go to Jacques videos (and pay very close attention to his recommendations for warm/ slush).

 

If you plan on using Hertel, it doesn't really matter what video you pick ;):eek (and no, that's really not a joke).

 

If you plan on using Zardoz, by itself or in combination with anything else, give me a shout backchannel Octoberish

post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidASkier View Post

I decided I would like to give tuning and waxing a try this winter. I will use a pair of my older skis to learn on. Looking for suggestions on highly regarded videos on tuning and waxing. I looked around YouTube and the videos are endless and techniques different. Being new to this I am looking for suggestions on the good videos for beginners.


You asked so here is my take.  Many more at my channel by searching there for "waxing" "tuning".   These are basic videos for one who wants to get going.

post #4 of 9
Start Haus videos:

Ski Tuning: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzAX1hV85KGqPey0XXcsKm8_0ffvY3zod

Don't try and learn everything at once. For you, I'd start with edge maintenance, since you're Ice Coast. Have the shop set the bevel, then just keep it sharp. Worry about setting a new bevel next year or maybe waxing next year, and add a little more each season. Follow along on the tuning threads here as a lurker. No need to buy every tool out there to start. It'll grow on you and in five years you'll be making lists for summer sales.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone for the information. These will be very helpful.

Yes the Snowtime mountains are my home mountains.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidASkier View Post

Thanks everyone for the information. These will be very helpful.

Yes the Snowtime mountains are my home mountains.


Good luck.  If you are a handy person with a tool and files etc. you will be successful and never look to anyone but yourself in the future.  If you plan on skiing for years the investment will pay off.

post #7 of 9

My shop is 10 miles west of Liberty; all Internet pricing and discounts for Liberty people.  Contact me if you want to look/handle equipment before you buy and talk tuning.

We have picked the best of the You Tube videos and posted them in our Learning Center:

http://racewax.com/t-tuning-tips.aspx

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
 

My shop is 10 miles west of Liberty; all Internet pricing and discounts for Liberty people.  Contact me if you want to look/handle equipment before you buy and talk tuning.

We have picked the best of the You Tube videos and posted them in our Learning Center:

http://racewax.com/t-tuning-tips.aspx

 

Definitely take Doctor D up on this. 

post #9 of 9

Ski vises are very useful, but kind'a expensive.  You can jury-rig some way to hold them securely.  They do need to be held securely.

 

There isn't a lot of need to do too much.  Here's what I do-

Yearly or so, have a good shop stone grind the bottoms and grind the edges to 1° base bevel* and 3° side bevel.

Take any edge burrs from hitting a rock off with a small stone.  Don't do anything else on the bottom edges.  It's OK to leave a small divot on the edges, but not a raised burr.

Use a diamond file in a 3° jig to sharpen the side edges.**  Color the edges with a felt tip pen, then just remove enough steel to take all the ink off.  

I use a universal wax--I like Hertel Super Hot Sauce--by dripping the wax on the ski, ironing it in, re-heating the wax, and wiping the excess off with a paper towel.

Go ski.  Have fun.  Some people do a lot more to their skis, I've tried it all, and I have just as much fun skiing using this technique.

 

 

 

*For the base bevel, I prefer the shop grind the bottom edges to 0.75°, then I feather the tips (1' back) and the tails (6" forward) to 1°.  The edges are sharp all the way to the beginning of the curve of the shovel and rounded above the beginning of the curve.  If I'm in an icy rut, I don't want sharp raised tips of the shovel grabbing the edge of that icy rut and pulling me up.

 

**On ice good technique matters most.  Sharp edges matter little with poor technique.

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