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Light weight AT ski suggestions

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Greetings! I'm looking to lighten my AT setup. I'm currently skiing The icelantic Nomad with the fritchi free rides and love them except for the weight. I want a fat ski that can do it all...as the nomad can, but lighter. I'm a 5' 8" expert woman skier. Thanks!
post #2 of 21
Take a look at the blizzard zero g 108
post #3 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssriess View Post

Greetings! I'm looking to lighten my AT setup. I'm currently skiing The icelantic Nomad with the fritchi free rides and love them except for the weight. I want a fat ski that can do it all...as the nomad can, but lighter. I'm a 5' 8" expert woman skier. Thanks!

switch to a tech binding, it removes pounds of weight off each step, anything else is just spending $$ that will not have a significant impact. You lift a frame binding with each and every step, a tech binding is just the boot pivoting on a set of pins, that is a massive difference over a few 1000 feet of vert. 

post #4 of 21
I switched to Kingpins tech binding last year. Even though they are not the lightest tech on the market it was a huge difference exactly as @Whiteroom pointed out. Will never ever move back to a frame binding.
Edited by emil - 8/4/16 at 3:40am
post #5 of 21

Definitely a tech binding (Dynafit) and AT Tech boots - bindings way lighter + boots way lighter + pivot point much more efficient + fore/aft range of boot cuff = much lighter and more efficient setup.  As far as skis go, lot's of manufacturers making a lighter weight BC version of their midfat and fat skis - so shouldn't be hard at all to find something you like.  Carbon Fiber skis will get you even lighter - I've got G3 Synapse 101 Carbon - super light.  It took a bit of getting used to the very light carbon tourning skis - they really don't ski the same - regardless of what their ad's say. For me, having a super light set up, including the skis, really helps as I usually ski with my 17 yr old son and I need every advantage I can get to keep up with him - ok, so maybe not keep up with, but at least keep him in sight distance.  If you want more downhill performance, and can suffer the weight of a slightly heavier ski, than a BC version of DH ski may be a good choice - but first go to an tech binding and tech boot.

post #6 of 21
As much as I don't really personally like them for area skiing, a Soul 7 with a tech binding also can make a nice touring set up.
post #7 of 21

From what I hear from top touring peeps here in the PNWW a great setup would be the K2 Coomback 114 w Marker KingPin.

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post

Definitely a tech binding (Dynafit) and AT Tech boots - bindings way lighter + boots way lighter + pivot point much more efficient + fore/aft range of boot cuff = much lighter and more efficient setup.  As far as skis go, lot's of manufacturers making a lighter weight BC version of their midfat and fat skis - so shouldn't be hard at all to find something you like.  Carbon Fiber skis will get you even lighter - I've got G3 Synapse 101 Carbon - super light.  It took a bit of getting used to the very light carbon tourning skis - they really don't ski the same - regardless of what their ad's say. For me, having a super light set up, including the skis, really helps as I usually ski with my 17 yr old son and I need every advantage I can get to keep up with him - ok, so maybe not keep up with, but at least keep him in sight distance.  If you want more downhill performance, and can suffer the weight of a slightly heavier ski, than a BC version of DH ski may be a good choice - but first go to an tech binding and tech boot.
Nailed it. Also sizing down your skis is another low cost solution. If you usually ride a 185cm for resort conditions, a 179cm length may be enough ski for descents and will likely tour better, lighter, easier to rip skins off without removing skis, easier for kick turns etc... stability in chop is really not a thing for touring.
post #9 of 21

Going full tech's going to entail new boots and way more expense.  OP's needs to assess how much she tours vs resort.

 

I've held off on tech, because I just don't have the time to tour that much.

I mostly do short tours and sled ski and frame setups have worked well for me.

I'll probably get a full tech setup at the end of this season, since I'm retiring next year. 

But I'm glad I've waited, because the technology in boots and bindings has changed immensely in the last few years.

post #10 of 21

I would look into Black Diamonds or G3 or any company that builds skis specifically for AT touring.  I love my G3 Saints but they are only 93mm at the waist.

post #11 of 21
This is the order in which to save weight.

Bindings
Boots
Skis

I tried many bc specific skis and I found them inferior.

I would go with a ski made by an alpine ski company.

Blizzard 108, volkl katana
post #12 of 21

How much difference is there in the weight of say a Fritschi Freeride to say a Dynastar tech binding?

 

Also same question for alpine boots vs a beefy enough touring boot? 

 

Same question for skis?

 

Whichever has the greatest weight difference will give you the greatest weight savings.  After all you are dragging it all along with every step you take...every move you make.. every trail you break...

post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingBurrito View Post
 

From what I hear from top touring peeps here in the PNWW a great setup would be the K2 Coomback 114 w Marker KingPin.

 

Who would they be? 

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post
 

1. How much difference is there in the weight of say a Fritschi Freeride to say a Dynastar tech binding?

 

2. Also same question for alpine boots vs a beefy enough touring boot? 

 

3. Same question for skis?

 

Whichever has the greatest weight difference will give you the greatest weight savings.  After all you are dragging it all along with every step you take...every move you make.. every trail you break...

 

1. A lot... a whole lot, not to mention that the old Fritchi bindings put you way up off the ski and torque alot on firm surfaces... there just really isn't upside to the old touring bindings vs new unless you're limiting your budget and not sure if you'll have that much time to tour.

 

2. Again... a lot. an awful lot. My AT boot (Dynafit Vulcan... not an ultra-lightweight, but) feel like lightweight slippers compared to my alpine boots (Head Raptor).

 

3. This is where it gets tricky... light skis are great for going up and make a huge difference if you're doing a lot of vertical. What dictates ski choice is really that balance of 'up' vs. what you expect on the 'down' i.e., how fast you typically feel comfortable skiing in mixed bc conditions. There are skis I love that I wouldn't chose to tour on as the weight penalty can really limit the day's possibilities. Oh the other hand, I've yet to meet an extremely light ski that I felt was solid on the down. If I were buying new skis for touring, I'd look at a Volkl V-Werks Katana, and maybe one of the new Blizzard touring skis. The Soul 7 and Quest skis can also work... anyhow....   The boots and binding though are easy. 

post #15 of 21

What markojp answered is correct on all counts.

 

Also, you can't just compare the weight difference between a frame AT binding and a Tech binding (Dynafit, etc), or a DH boot and an AT boot - there's way more to it than just weight. The pivot point on a tech binding is essentially near the tip of your toe.  A frame binding pivot point is well forward of that - makes a big difference. And as markojp also mentioned, an AT boot, even a heavier AT boot, feels a lot different when you're skinning up than a DH boot - feels more like you're in a light hiking boot or trail running shoes compared to a DH boot.  A lot of the really light AT boots now have reasonable stifness when locked into ski mode now days.  There's an AT boot right for you whether you're all about super light uphill or more about big mountain downhill.  As others have mentioned, it all comes at a cost.

 

Another thing to consider is what your skiing partners are using - if they're all using tech gear and you're using a frame biinding setup, and assuming that you're all about the same physical condition, than they will leave you in the dust on the way up, especially on longer days - or if you're just quick lapping a pitch, they will be at a much faster pace.  

 

As far as skis that I've tried that are a tour version of DH skis, I've demo'd ON3P Steeple's and really liked them.  Lighter than a DH ski, but not as light as a G3 or BD Carbon touring ski - but much better DH performance than the superlights.

 

For what it's worth - I started touring with Atomic Tracker frame bindings on Rossi S3's using my DH boots and had no complaints other than tiring out quickly and not keeping up with anybody - but still had a blast.  I switched to my light tech setup and much much better for me going up, lasting longer,etc - but that's just me - my son still is using his Atomic Tracker frame bindings with DH boots and still kicks my a** up and down,

post #16 of 21

Just on the ski side of things.... For my .02 (as usual), take a look at the Praxis BC and the Praxis GPO. In terns of general dimensions, the BC is sorta kinda  similar to the Soul 7 (but predates it by years). And the GPO is kinda roughly  similar to the Super. The 170 BC weighs all of 7 pounds and the 180 all of 7.5. The BC is solid enough on the down that IIRC Tabke rode a pair to a FWT podium a while back. Though he could ride anything anywhere, so there is that ;) 

post #17 of 21

Another ski is Fischer Hannibal. I'm a light male 5'7" 130lbs and liked how they skied at the resort. They carve like crap but that's not what they're meant to do anyway. If your weight is similar to mine I would consider them.

 

http://backcountryskiingcanada.com/index.php?p=page&page_id=Fischer-Hannibal-100-Ski-Review

post #18 of 21

Light ski?  Look at DPS.

 

And as mentioned if not done so already, Dynafit/tech bindings and compatible boots.

post #19 of 21
The new Salomon QST series is pretty damn impressive in the weight/performance dept.


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post #20 of 21

Women-specific skis are generally lighter. I use my K2MissBehaved for backcountry. They don't make that model anymore but try looking through K2 and volkl women skis for the dimensions you want. 

post #21 of 21

Really good information in this thread and useful to anyone searching.   Succinct, clear good advice.

 

However my guess is the OP is a troll.  Name hints at that.  First post with a somewhat provocative question.  Then no response from the OP.  When I go seeking information outside my comfort zone on the net I ask follow up questions and I am thankful to those who offered help.  Not that there is protocol for internet responses, but none seem quite unusual.

 

One of the harder things on the internet is identifying and not feeding the trolls.  Sometimes folks are somewhat clueless in their questions and are seeking genuine information.  Sometimes they are new and have questions to ask-I have joined several automotive and the first thing I am doing is putting up a thread asking a question.  

 

Then there are the times higher post folks troll a board.  Some become infamous on the board.  We have had a few here at epic ski.  Sometimes it is a person trolling another person specifically.  I did this recently when I trolled Tyler about how much he actually skied.  I owned it and apologized.  The hard line is when does being provocative-which can be interesting cross over into trolling.   Certainly intent needs to be there in terms of putting the person trolled in a bad way.  Whether it is a unassailable snub-what I did, or baiting-much more common or just having a person put time and thought into a response that the OP did not really care about.

 

A bit of a game trying to identify the trolls.  In all my years on the net, I have rarely called one out-goes against not feeding them to begin with.

 

Thing is I don't know if the OP is a troll, but "she" seems like one.

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