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Flex for a 6'3" 200lbs beginner?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi, What to see if I could get some advice? I am 50 years old, 6'3" and 200lbs.  As a beginner can I get away with a higher boot flex due to my height and weight?  Or should I stick with a boot with 65 -75 Flex?  Thanks

post #2 of 12

Higher... minimum 90-100.

post #3 of 12

Yep, likely around 100 as a starting point.  At 6'3" you have a lot of leverage, and at 200lbs you have some mass.  You'll fold up a 70 boot without trying.

 

The best advice you can take is to talk with a good boot fitter.  For example, your dorsiflexion (i.e. the amount of flex you have when lifting the front of your foot upwards whilst keeping your lower leg static) will have an impact on the flex you need in a boot.  If you have minimal dorsiflexion (like me) you'll need a stiffer boot in order to influence the font of the ski.  There are a number of other inputs to get your boot fitting right, so you need a good boot fitter to make sure the get the right fit.

 

Best of luck.

post #4 of 12

As Sinbad implies, there are a lot more factors than just flex to a well fitting, well skiing boot. Get to a bootfitter and let them help you out. If you tell us where you live, the folks here can probably recommend one too.

post #5 of 12
Soft boots equal very forgiving boots. Excessive movements and energy are absorbed in the boot as it deforms letting the ski do the work. Newbie beginners tend to have very large movements.

As stiffness increases responsiveness increases and forgiveness decreases. Same excessive movement will over input the ski and cause issues. (For the most part skis also get stiffer)

Boot stiffness also control proper motion, too stiff at the beginning and you are hindered in learning correct motion.

If you are just starting(newbie), rent and learn a bit first, take advantage of the forgiveness. If you've already done this (now a beginner), yes, the slight increase is the way to go as now you need the increased stiffness to progress, just be aware it can still cause you a few issue.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by murphysf View Post
 

Hi, What to see if I could get some advice? I am 50 years old, 6'3" and 200lbs.  As a beginner can I get away with a higher boot flex due to my height and weight?  Or should I stick with a boot with 65 -75 Flex?  Thanks


Some general info about boot flex, including comments by an experience boot fitter:

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/116467/buying-boots-what-does-that-boot-flex-mean-a-beginner-zone-thread

 

In short, a good fit makes a lot more difference than flex.  Especially since flex numbers only apply for a given brand.  A 100 flex boot from one brand can be quite difference from a 100 flex boot from another brand.  Just as a black trail at a ski area in the southeast is nothing like a black trail in the northeast or Rockies.

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

In short, a good fit makes a lot more difference than flex.  Especially since flex numbers only apply for a given brand.  A 100 flex boot from one brand can be quite difference from a 100 flex boot from another brand.  Just as a black trail at a ski area in the southeast is nothing like a black trail in the northeast or Rockies.

 

Very well said. It seems like boot flex is the new "helmet" or "east versus west" or a "what boot should I buy" (the red ones of course!).

 

Look, to ONCE AGAIN confirm - flex numbers are NOT the same (sometimes) within or (always) between brands, so don't go giving "advice" about flex when the OP typically has NO CLUE WHATSOEVER what he's asking for. There are now some chronic boot flex "experts" here that are just doing a disservice to any who ask this question.

 

This should be mandatory response when discussing boot flex:

 

"The best advice you can take is to talk with a good boot fitter.  For example, your dorsiflexion (i.e. the amount of flex you have when lifting the front of your foot upwards whilst keeping your lower leg static) will have an impact on the flex you need in a boot.  If you have minimal dorsiflexion (like me) you'll need a stiffer boot in order to influence the font of the ski.  There are a number of other inputs to get your boot fitting right, so you need a good boot fitter to make sure the get the right fit."

post #8 of 12
What markojp said!

At 6'6" and 240 lb, my first boots were 100 flex and did well by me until I started skiing faster. I was able to sell them for a good price in a ski consignment sale by my local shop, so not a lost cause at all. Used that money towards the next set of stiffer, better fitting boots from that shop.
post #9 of 12
Most boot manufactures put the better liners and hardware in the higher flex boots

With your weight and height you are going to probably need a 110 or better boot

Remember a higher flex boot can be softened by the boot fitter so there should be no worries with that

The other thing you want to keep in mind is that you ski in the sierras and it's actually fairly warm compared to many other locations in the country and allows using a higher flex than you would in a colder climate zone
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello

 

I just gave a friend $10 for a pair of Salomon Course Flex 120 boots Mondo 29.5.  Some of the other writing on the boot is Carbon Link Advanced Chassis Technology.  They have canting adjustments on the inner and outer ankle area.

 

 

There is the following stamped inside the shell

28 / 29.5

IF 336261

D > TPU

03 stamp so I guess this is the date code 2003.  Friend told me they were just a few years old.  Said he bought them in Spain and only used them on one ski trip.

334mm is stamped on the outer sole edge

 

 

 

The liner is a Course CF PRO with the numbers 295 36 SB 3 and text Sensifit

 

And has the original Salomon Course foot bed.

 

I guess I have four questions.

 

Is the 120 Flex going to be too stiff for me?

 

Does anyone know what the Last is of this boot?

 

Can I put the liners in the clothes washer with a little bit of soap, OxiClean or bleach, vinegar and or ammonium?  I know not to put them in the dryer.  My plan ws to leave them out to dry, its warm here in California now.

 

 

Should I give these a try next season, just to hang around with my 4 and 6 years as they learn to ski?   I guess I would call myself a beginner, I am 6'3" 200 lbs and haven't skied on 30 years and back in high school I only skied something like 5-6 times.

post #11 of 12

Pull the liners out of the shells and remove the footbeds.  Spray all of that with hydrogen peroxide straight out of the dark brown bottle (you can buy it in spray bottles now).  Let everything dry by evaporation.  Spray them again, if any odor persists.  Hydrogen Peroxide does a good job on dirty shoe interiors - it kills mildew and mold and bacteria and so on, and removes odors very well.  You don't need to rinse it out, just let it dry.       -- Do not wash the liners with soap and water.  Do not put them in the washer or dryer.  You don't want to de-form them.

 

People are going to ask you about how those boots fit.  A good snug fit is essential if you want to have control of your skis.

post #12 of 12

Several things;

 

Size Mondo 29.5, is about a 29.5cm foot length (give or take, just a guideline, which is why a boot fitter is important but for $10.00 worth the gamble)

 

Last, most boots base off of 26.5 at 98mm (or there abouts) +1mm each size increase, -1mm each decrease. (again guideline)

 

If this is a race or high performance boot likely the boot can be soften a bit by removing a bolt (one only) as the second reduces rebound.  Approximately a 10 reduction.  (again a guideline).  Both bolts about 20 but the rebound is dramatically reduced.

 

Boots should fit snug...!

 

Play with cuff adjustment adjustment only after skiing them, assume they are neutral to start, adjust if required (without liner in place lag should be centered thru ROM).   Cuff adjustment is often called cant adjustment, read up on this.  True cant is done differently. Again Boot Fitter.

 

Finally, if they are indeed 2003 boots, use them while they last (provided they fit), and budget on new boots in a year or two and save for a good set, you'll likely be ready then and really begin to understand what you need and want.  Boot Fitter.....

 

Otherwise if they fit, you'll likely do ok since you know that they will be more responsive to your errors.  Ski correctly they will reward you, ski incorrectly they will punish you. and for $10.00 Thumbs Up worth the gamble.

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